Dougalmacs Workbench

What are you up to on your workbench
dougalmac2
Posts: 263
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:40 pm

Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby dougalmac2 » Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:43 pm

Hi Guys (& Gals)

I recently purchased cheaply a Hornby R052 Jinty.

When I tried running it it didn't work at all. The good bit is that this model is so easy to strip down to the last nut & bolt. I then found it had been well lubricated and it looked as though it had been done with a spray can. All that was cleaned off and the motor looked as good as new. I've only tried running with a short straight and an uncontrolled 9v power supply but it at least runs both ways.

The body was pristine but was a late emblem type so the first job was to convert it to early crest . That was straight forward (I haven't tried renumbering yet).

My main moan on RTR locos is the coal! I've bottled out of butchering locos I've paid a lot of money for but thought I would have a go at this one. The coal & rails were cut off easily so I fabricated new rails with styrene strip (hasn't the cost of that rocketed, blame Brexit), a bit fiddly but quite pleased with the result. Coal - I had a piece I picked up at a heritage line some time ago and attacked that with a lump hammer and then spent a lot of time trying to pick out pieces of the right size. SWMBO wouldn't release her kitchen sieve.

Very difficult to photo black coal on a black loco but here's the result.

ImageI then tried some weathering. For wagons I usually dry paint acrylic but for a change decided to try using pastels. Having scraped some into a container and mixed to a colour that looked nice and dusty I rubbed it over the loco with fingers and a brush and ended with what looked like a good result. Then gave it a quick couple of coats of matt varnish and ended up with - nothing.

Image
Don't know where the 'dust' went, I'm sure it didn't just blow awAy, but I'll go back to dry brushing acrylic and see how I get on.

Sorry I didn't do progressive pics but only just decided to postthe project.

Mac
Last edited by dougalmac2 on Fri Nov 17, 2017 5:24 pm, edited 2 times in total.

dougalmac2
Posts: 263
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:40 pm

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby dougalmac2 » Sun Mar 26, 2017 5:42 pm

Hi all,

Further progress on my Jinty. Tried running it on my oval, ran well both ways but a bit noisy and with a whine, so a bit more investigation needed there.

I cut off the original tension lock coupling as I want to use S & W. I only normally fit the loop on locos, and in this case there asn't room for anything else. The easiest mounting was to build the loop on a little plate which would fix under the chassis bottom with the normal fixing screw. One thing I did find is that the loco sits about 3 mm higher than everything else, but I don't think there's any easy fix on that.

Image


Image


From the pics you can see that I used too thick a piece of brass wire, but that will do for making sure it works. it looks a bit thick on the pic above but with a van coupled up isn't too noticable.

Image

I've made a new sart with the weathering and I think thats coming along how I want it. I don't want it looking as locos did in the 1960s.

Mac
Last edited by dougalmac2 on Fri Nov 17, 2017 5:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Firefly16
Posts: 213
Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2016 1:09 am

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby Firefly16 » Sun Mar 26, 2017 6:56 pm

Like your approach to the coupling dougalmac!

User avatar
Bufferstop
Posts: 11251
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2010 12:06 pm
Location: Bottom end of N. Warks line

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby Bufferstop » Sun Mar 26, 2017 10:56 pm

One thing I did find is that the loco sits about 3 mm higher than everything else,

"The Curse of Triang/Rovex" A distortion of dimensions made to make fitting in the earliest mechanisms and perpetuated down the years. Still hanging around in Railroad products the 4 wheel coaches being a typical example.
Growing old, can't avoid it. Growing up, forget it!
My Layout, My Workbench Blog and My Opinions

dougalmac2
Posts: 263
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:40 pm

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby dougalmac2 » Mon Mar 27, 2017 7:17 pm

Firefly - Thanks for that, it does make it easier not having to fit a hook as well. I've just been trying to find where I got the idea from of using S&W without the hook on locos, must have been on here somewhere.

Bufferstop - I thought it was probably something like that. It will probably spend a lot of time running light so won't be too obvious.

Thanks for watching this post.

Mac

dougalmac2
Posts: 263
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:40 pm

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby dougalmac2 » Thu Apr 06, 2017 8:09 pm

I've decided to include this episode in the 'Workbench' as that is where most of the work was done.

Some time ago I saw some cassette storage based on square drainpipes cut in half legthways with track fixed into it. That was the easy bit and I seem to remember track power was transfered by automatic location clips or by spring wire soldered to the rails which contacted to the next unit.
The way I decided to try it was use a locating device made with styrene and transfer power by crocodile clips.

The first photo shows how I made this piece with two located together with the rails and one in front of that which shows how it works, then the various bits used.

Image

Although its not easy to see this photo shows the end of the siding connected to the first cassette. Although I made a simple jig to line up the track in the middle of the half pipe, it doesn't have to be that accurate as the two tongues line everything up. I was experimenting here with securing the locator and track to the pipe, The siding side was glued to pins which came up from underneath and the cassette side was fixed via two staples pushed through pre drilled holes then bent over. This is the method I decided on. We can also see the way the clips connect the power.

Image

Next we can see the siding and cassette seperated which shows the croc clips and a strip of copper wire fixed near the top of the pipe that completes the connection.
Image

This is shown in better detail here.

Image

One completed cassette shows that a yard of track can hold a train of nine normal 1950's/60's wagons with some space at each end for a security devIce.

Image

And a shorter one for a loco.

Image

Image

Image

Then the train can be shuffled or turned round and we're ready for the return journey.

Image

So far, I only have one cassette siding on the up and one on the down lines but I plan having another opposing one on each to make arrivals and departures easier.

The last part of this venture is to decide how tho stop stock rolling off the cassette when is being handled. So far I'm leaning towards a removable rod between two holes with some form of padding (sponge or polystyrene), although I am also considering the idea of a form of clip in bufferstop. All suggestions will be gratefully received.

Mac
Last edited by dougalmac2 on Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
TimberSurf
Posts: 2439
Joined: Wed Jan 08, 2014 5:47 pm
Location: N.Wales
Contact:

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby TimberSurf » Fri Apr 07, 2017 11:31 pm

That seems very arduous making your own alignment devices! Might I suggest my idea, use Plastic electrical square lidded trunking, available at reasonable cost from Electrical wholesalers.
http://cpc.farnell.com/pro-power/ct30/c ... p/CBBR7905
The lid is not used but is handy plastic stock and the nice square trunking simply needs the track glued to it! To do both track alignment and electrical connection, use inline "banana" plugs and sockets, the two colours opposing in opposing directions to each other (allows tray reversal), these can be glued directly into the trunking corners.

banana connected transport.jpg
banana connected transport.jpg (16.34 KiB) Viewed 1077 times


Or buy a trunking joiner and glue to one side and use alternate for electrical connection.


http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/4mm-Insulated ... SwKtVWwEx4
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/10-x-4mm-In-L ... SwfVpYuR5s

Ends can be bought for this type of trunking!
Image
Lumsdonia <--- Hit link to go to my website for full story and wiring advice!

dougalmac2
Posts: 263
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:40 pm

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby dougalmac2 » Sat Apr 08, 2017 8:09 pm

Hi Timbersurf

Thanks for your comments, I like your trunking idea as it looks a lot neater than my drainpipe. To be honest I saw it done this way and just followed on without thinking of the alternatives. I already had the styrene and croc clips so stuck with them as it gave me automatic track alignment, although I considered some thing like banana plugs but have lost confidence in gluing unknown plastics.

Have you used your method?

Mac

nickbrad
Posts: 830
Joined: Fri Jan 15, 2010 11:53 am
Location: Lincoln, UK

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby nickbrad » Sat Apr 08, 2017 8:39 pm

I'd be tempted to go for the 75mm version of that trunking due to it being an external measurement, but I've got to admit, I am very much liking the idea of using that

User avatar
TimberSurf
Posts: 2439
Joined: Wed Jan 08, 2014 5:47 pm
Location: N.Wales
Contact:

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby TimberSurf » Sat Apr 08, 2017 11:18 pm

Both the trunking and those particular type of banana plugs are PVC, solvent glue for plumbing waste pipe will "weld" them together!
I don't need a cassette system, but have seen aluminium ones with door bolts made in a similar fashion and my design brain is always looking at better/cheaper alternatives. I don't have any large trunking to hand, but I might experiment for you when I get a chance! :P
Image
Lumsdonia <--- Hit link to go to my website for full story and wiring advice!

dougalmac2
Posts: 263
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:40 pm

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby dougalmac2 » Sun Apr 09, 2017 8:25 pm

Hi again Timbersurf.

There does seem to be nearly as many ways of doing this as there are layouts. The most common seems to be a strip of wood about 70mm wide with aluminium channel screwed on at 16.5mm spacing with various designs of clips to carry the current.

I'll remember that info for future use but I still have about 4 metres of channel left, and enough styrene and clips to keep me going for some time, so unless you really wanted to experiment I wouldn't bother acquiring the channel, but I do appreciate the offer. Of course, if you do, other forum members may be interested to see it.

Mac

dougalmac2
Posts: 263
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:40 pm

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby dougalmac2 » Sun Apr 09, 2017 8:28 pm

Sorry Timbersurf'

Having reread that post I realise it sounds as though I'm not interested but that is most certainly not the case. I'm just not very subtle at explaining things.

Mac

User avatar
TimberSurf
Posts: 2439
Joined: Wed Jan 08, 2014 5:47 pm
Location: N.Wales
Contact:

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby TimberSurf » Sun Apr 09, 2017 8:59 pm

No problem :) . It was unasked for advice anyway!
I did glue one banana to a bit of trunking lid last night, today, it might as well be one piece of plastic! As I suspected, both plastics are highly compatible with the glue, t'is truly welded! Now you that you mention the wood, yes rings bells and of course saves track, but running wheels on aluminium can't be a great idea! (and would be a nightmare to fix the banana plug to it!)
Image
Lumsdonia <--- Hit link to go to my website for full story and wiring advice!

dougalmac2
Posts: 263
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:40 pm

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby dougalmac2 » Sun Apr 09, 2017 9:40 pm

From what I remember they had pieces of brass screwed or riveted to the upright pieces of the ally angle. Very straight forward, but like yourself I don't think I like the idea of wheels on alumimium.

Mac
Last edited by dougalmac2 on Sun Apr 23, 2017 8:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

dougalmac2
Posts: 263
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:40 pm

Re: Dougalmacs Workbench

Postby dougalmac2 » Wed Apr 12, 2017 7:34 pm

As some may have noticed I opened a post in the general discussion forum regarding a problem with stripping down a Hornby Fowler 2-6-4T which was a non-runner. At the time I commented that a number of people seem to think that the first thing to do in that situation is to give the whole thing a thick coat of oil. Once I had got the underframe off (that was the initial difficulty) I was able to take the wheel sets out and give it a good clean. I couldn't believe how much oil was in there. This pic shows how much came off the driving axle alone. Why anyone would think that would help I don't know.

Image

I did mention that I had the same situation with the Jinty that I started this post with. I've finally quietened that down and the fix was a small spot of oil on the rear bearing on the motor, the only part of the loco which was dry. I ran it round the track for 15 minutes then wiped off any visible oil.

Mac
Last edited by dougalmac2 on Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.


Return to “The Workbench”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests