Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

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glencairn
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by glencairn »

One can only come up with so many superlatives then just admire the work.

Glencairn
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Phred
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by Phred »

I somehow missed the video of the show until now. The look of rapt fascination on the faces of the people viewing the layout says it all really. Superb work.
Jim S-W
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by Jim S-W »

Just one of those every day, run of the mill style posts this time but with a few little tweaks to appease the wagon buffs.

Image
Starting with the Parkside kit for the LNER 21t riveted coal hopper.  Built pretty much as instructed but I did change the side stanchion plates for 10 thou plasticard as the ones in the kit were a bit chunky.

Image
The spare brakes that came with the above kit were used to correct the brakes on my prototype 24.5t hopper I've  featured before.

Image
The humble D2150 13t open from the Parkside kit. The only real visual difference between these and the BR build is the small lip on the ends. A bit of 10x20 thou mictrostrip sorted that.

Image
Ex LNER Diagram 210 adapted from the parkside kit for the Dia 1/120 wagon. The side stanchion were slightly reshaped as were the buffer beams while the chassis was replaced with spares from my scrap box.

Image
Another bog standard affair, the D2039 ex LMS 12t van. This one was built from the Ratio kit with the addiction of the Rumney Models LMS van detailing etch (B105). It features the 3 part end for a super subtle bit of variety.

Image
Finally something a little more involved. Before and after of the sides for a D2103 12t van using the parkside fruit van as a start point. The ends were scratchbuilt.

Image
Bigmet
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by Bigmet »

Neat selection of very commonplace vehicles, really like the variations you have applied. How about a few rusty dents on the all steel hopper, around the batter plates where the Teemer has wielded his hammer to release a frozen in load?
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End2end
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by End2end »

On the sides for the D2103 12t van, how did you manage / what did you use to remove the horizontal bars please Jim?
They are unnoticeable on the finished model.
Thanks
End2end
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Dad-1
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by Dad-1 »

Hi Jim,

The Parkside range offer some good kits, but Jim you raise them to
another level. Mind you without some modifications being pointed
out I'd not notice, O.K I'll admit I've never been a perfectionist.

Geoff T
Jim S-W
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by Jim S-W »

Bigmet wrote: Fri Jan 05, 2024 10:24 am Neat selection of very commonplace vehicles, really like the variations you have applied. How about a few rusty dents on the all steel hopper, around the batter plates where the Teemer has wielded his hammer to release a frozen in load?
Interesting - do you have an example of this as its not something ive noticed before? Obviously a 4mm scale hammer head would leave a pretty small mark.
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by Jim S-W »

End2end wrote: Fri Jan 05, 2024 11:00 am On the sides for the D2103 12t van, how did you manage / what did you use to remove the horizontal bars please Jim?
They are unnoticeable on the finished model.
Thanks
End2end
Nothing cleverer than a small modellers chisel and some fine sanding sticks. :wink:
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End2end
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by End2end »

Thanks for the reply Jim. :)
You've certainly done an excellent job. A viewer would never have known that it previously had horizontal bars.
Thanks
End2end
"St Blazey's" - The progress and predicaments.
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Jim S-W
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by Jim S-W »

As a follow on to the last post - more every-day wagons have rolled off the workbench.  This time it's a quartet of shock wagons.

Image
Starting with the basics - Diagram 1/040 shock open from the Parkside kit.  Built pretty much as supplied with the addition of a Rumney Models tarpaulin bar and a sheet from my now standard black latex glove.

Image
Next ex LMS diagram 1983 from the same kit as above with the additional top lip on the ends and buffers from Lanarkshire models.  You cant see it in the pic but I replaced the floor with scribed lead sheet.

Image
A smidge more involved is this Diagram 1/038 shock open from the parkside kit for the standard (not shock) wagon.  I shortened the sides by cutting sections out next to the middle section and mounted them on a new floor as the prototype wagons had a visible lip around the bottom.

Image
Finally a diagram 1/219 shock palvan.  A bit more involved again as I could use spare ends and a roof from Parkside standard 12t vans but the sides needed to be made from scratch.  The chassis is the Red Panda kit.
Bigmet
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by Bigmet »

Jim S-W wrote: Mon Jan 15, 2024 10:13 pm ...Image
A smidge more involved is this Diagram 1/038 shock open from the parkside kit for the standard (not shock) wagon. I shortened the sides by cutting sections out next to the middle section and mounted them on a new floor as the prototype wagons had a visible lip around the bottom...
Neat job. BR seemed to have a bit of fun with their variants of the LNER Histeel design, relating to the floors. There was a regular 17'6" version (I/047) with a bulb moulding on the lower bodyside and the floor plank ends on view, with extra body retaining plates welded to the underframe, which makes for a distinctively different looking model (= ugly!) which I have done. I have wondered if this was to aid drainage to prevent either or both of the lower bodyside rusting or the floor plank ends rotting; due to water being trapped there?
Jim S-W
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by Jim S-W »

Bigmet wrote: Tue Jan 16, 2024 1:31 pm There was a regular 17'6" version (I/047) with a bulb moulding on the lower bodyside and the floor plank ends on view, with extra body retaining plates welded to the underframe, which makes for a distinctively different looking model (= ugly!)
I'll have to see if I can find a picture of one of those :wink:
Jim S-W
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by Jim S-W »

One working that passed through the real Brettell Lane and kind of fascinated me was the St Blazey to Etruria china clay working. This service ran for years and was somewhat erratic in the paths it took. Usually going via Worcester, Stourbridge then Dudley before heading off to Bescot. Or it could go right at Stourbridge via Old Hill and (I think) Soho Junction. These routes avoided the Lickey but I've seen pictures of it going that way too in later years. When I was at University in Stoke it would often turn up at lunch time behind a pair of class 37s although it did switch to a class 60 in the time I was there.
So to have a clay train on Brettell road makes sense as a through service. I like the classic diagram 1/051 clay opens with their sort of cute, baby open wagon look about them. A little bit of rewriting of history is needed though as they tended to stay in Cornwall and not venture out to the Midlands. Brettell Road is set before the introduction of the clayliner service so my justification is that BR was trialing things out to see how they would work and thats good enough for me.

Image
Ratio make a nice little kit for these and I was fortunate to find someone selling a box of 7 on Ebay for what basically worked out as a fiver each. The bodies go together well with a little bit of modification to make the ends fit. The kit features a somewhat crude attempt at a roller bearing and the brake levers are quite poor. It also includes cast buffers that aren't all that great. So the bearings were replaced with MJT ones although my research showed oil axleboxes to be more common anyway. Brake levers are from the Mainly Trains etch, door bangers from Rumney models and buffers from Lanarkshire models. I did one as a test then built the other 6 as a batch.

Image
Before I move onto the sheets a bit about the weathering.  I followed my usual approach of a wash of dark grime followed by a spray of AK interactive dark mud. This was then all sealed with Klear before AK interactive white ink was used (in various levels of dilution) to give an overall effect of clay staining. You don't want a fully weathered wagon at this stage, try to think of it as you are aiming for about half the effect you ultimately want.

Previously when I have done wagon sheets I make the sheet up with the ropes attached to it and then attach it to the wagon. This is a bit of a faff and sometimes the glue holding the rope to the sheet can give an odd effect so I approached this a bit differently.  Roping of wagon sheets is a whole topic on its own and I will leave that too someone who has properly studied the subject but I just looked at pictures and coped what I saw. So the first stage is to attach the ropes (cotton) to the wagon - Tying it on at the visible ends and gluing to the wagon top with Loctite

Image
This was then tided up by first sealing the knots with Zap Pink superglue.  Theres no huge reason to trim the ropes inside the wagon but it pays to just keep things neat so they don't get in the way later.

Image
As mentioned before the sheet is made from black latex gloves (actually nitrile) and mine are a brand called Supertouch.  They are a bit awkward to cut as the material tends to snag on the scalpel blade even if the blade is brand new.  A method I found to work best is to stretch the glove over a bit of cardboard, make a template and to cut it using the handle end of the blade not the pointy end, pushing the scalpel away from you to cut. I don't know why this makes a difference but it does!   As i've mentioned in the past the material is black on the outside and a dark grey on the inside.  I use the black side as its depicting wet conditions but the grey is good for a nice sunny day layout.

The sheet is then positioned in place, not forgetting to add weight inside the wagon and bulking it up with a bit of tissue first before gluing to the wagon tops in 6 places, about where the ropes are. Use Loctite and start in the middle (it sets very quickly) and remember to pull it taught as you glue the outer sides.  This is one of those things were you probably need a bit of variation but you don't want to force it. I find if I try to be as neat as I can, I'm not all that neat really and I get the variation by default.

Image
Next stage is to glue the sides of the sheet to the ropes, again with loctite and again puling the sheet taught.  I found holding it in place for 10 seconds was all you need. It pays to glue the sheet the side of the wagon at the ends at this stage

Image
On to the ends. Another drop of super glue on the top and the sheet can be glued in place. The corners can be folded and secured in place and the last set of ropes glued into the sheet itself.

Image
The last ropes tied into place and tidied up.

Image
The final weathering, back to the white ink (sprayed this time) with some additional grease stains on the underframe.

Image
To break up the rake a bit I added a few 10ft wheelbase opens too.  These are actually way more typical of the actual wagons used in the clayliners.  The ex LMS Diagram 2150 I've featured before a few posts ago.

Image
Likewise the ex LNE diagram 210 (although not this specific model)

Image
A new wagon type for me is the ex LNE diagram 185. This was constructed from the body of the Cambrian kit C81 for the LNER 12ton 6 plank Open Wagon, With a Parkside 10ft underframe. Theres a few tweaks needed to the body as can be seen and theres an additional top support across the top of the door which is worth adding assuming you aren't going to cover it over with a sheet that is!

Image
Just need an enterprising transfer manufacturer to produce some sheet markings now.
Phred
Posts: 528
Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2023 10:53 pm
Location: Queensland Australia

Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by Phred »

Thanks for sharing that very interesting process, Jim. The finished tarps and ropes look very realistic indeed. 8)
Jaz
Posts: 271
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Re: Birmingham New Street and Brettell Road in P4

Post by Jaz »

Jim S-W wrote: Sat Feb 03, 2024 6:25 pm One working that passed through the real Brettell Lane and kind of fascinated me was the St Blazey to Etruria china clay working. This service ran for years and was somewhat erratic in the paths it took. Usually going via Worcester, Stourbridge then Dudley before heading off to Bescot. Or it could go right at Stourbridge via Old Hill and (I think) Soho Junction. These routes avoided the Lickey but I've seen pictures of it going that way too in later years. When I was at University in Stoke it would often turn up at lunch time behind a pair of class 37s although it did switch to a class 60 in the time I was there.
So to have a clay train on Brettell road makes sense as a through service. I like the classic diagram 1/051 clay opens with their sort of cute, baby open wagon look about them. A little bit of rewriting of history is needed though as they tended to stay in Cornwall and not venture out to the Midlands. Brettell Road is set before the introduction of the clayliner service so my justification is that BR was trialing things out to see how they would work and thats good enough for me.

Image
Ratio make a nice little kit for these and I was fortunate to find someone selling a box of 7 on Ebay for what basically worked out as a fiver each. The bodies go together well with a little bit of modification to make the ends fit. The kit features a somewhat crude attempt at a roller bearing and the brake levers are quite poor. It also includes cast buffers that aren't all that great. So the bearings were replaced with MJT ones although my research showed oil axleboxes to be more common anyway. Brake levers are from the Mainly Trains etch, door bangers from Rumney models and buffers from Lanarkshire models. I did one as a test then built the other 6 as a batch.

Image
Before I move onto the sheets a bit about the weathering.  I followed my usual approach of a wash of dark grime followed by a spray of AK interactive dark mud. This was then all sealed with Klear before AK interactive white ink was used (in various levels of dilution) to give an overall effect of clay staining. You don't want a fully weathered wagon at this stage, try to think of it as you are aiming for about half the effect you ultimately want.

Previously when I have done wagon sheets I make the sheet up with the ropes attached to it and then attach it to the wagon. This is a bit of a faff and sometimes the glue holding the rope to the sheet can give an odd effect so I approached this a bit differently.  Roping of wagon sheets is a whole topic on its own and I will leave that too someone who has properly studied the subject but I just looked at pictures and coped what I saw. So the first stage is to attach the ropes (cotton) to the wagon - Tying it on at the visible ends and gluing to the wagon top with Loctite

Image
This was then tided up by first sealing the knots with Zap Pink superglue.  Theres no huge reason to trim the ropes inside the wagon but it pays to just keep things neat so they don't get in the way later.

Image
As mentioned before the sheet is made from black latex gloves (actually nitrile) and mine are a brand called Supertouch.  They are a bit awkward to cut as the material tends to snag on the scalpel blade even if the blade is brand new.  A method I found to work best is to stretch the glove over a bit of cardboard, make a template and to cut it using the handle end of the blade not the pointy end, pushing the scalpel away from you to cut. I don't know why this makes a difference but it does!   As i've mentioned in the past the material is black on the outside and a dark grey on the inside.  I use the black side as its depicting wet conditions but the grey is good for a nice sunny day layout.

The sheet is then positioned in place, not forgetting to add weight inside the wagon and bulking it up with a bit of tissue first before gluing to the wagon tops in 6 places, about where the ropes are. Use Loctite and start in the middle (it sets very quickly) and remember to pull it taught as you glue the outer sides.  This is one of those things were you probably need a bit of variation but you don't want to force it. I find if I try to be as neat as I can, I'm not all that neat really and I get the variation by default.

Image
Next stage is to glue the sides of the sheet to the ropes, again with loctite and again puling the sheet taught.  I found holding it in place for 10 seconds was all you need. It pays to glue the sheet the side of the wagon at the ends at this stage

Image
On to the ends. Another drop of super glue on the top and the sheet can be glued in place. The corners can be folded and secured in place and the last set of ropes glued into the sheet itself.

Image
The last ropes tied into place and tidied up.

Image
The final weathering, back to the white ink (sprayed this time) with some additional grease stains on the underframe.

Image
To break up the rake a bit I added a few 10ft wheelbase opens too.  These are actually way more typical of the actual wagons used in the clayliners.  The ex LMS Diagram 2150 I've featured before a few posts ago.

Image
Likewise the ex LNE diagram 210 (although not this specific model)

Image
A new wagon type for me is the ex LNE diagram 185. This was constructed from the body of the Cambrian kit C81 for the LNER 12ton 6 plank Open Wagon, With a Parkside 10ft underframe. Theres a few tweaks needed to the body as can be seen and theres an additional top support across the top of the door which is worth adding assuming you aren't going to cover it over with a sheet that is!

Image
Just need an enterprising transfer manufacturer to produce some sheet markings now.
Excellent work
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