Soldering

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Tosh
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Re: Soldering

Postby Tosh » Fri Apr 02, 2010 7:49 pm

noel wrote:+

Zunnan wrote:
......... Re. lead based solder, ..... wash your hands thoroughly after
handling/working with lead based solder.


When making white metal kits the warning was always: never eat
"Lettuce and Tomato" sandwiches at the same time!

+

Good job i had cheese & onion then :lol: :lol:
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Hulldude15
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Re: Soldering

Postby Hulldude15 » Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:15 am

Thanks for everyones help. I can now solder droppers to the track quite easily. My next problem is soldering the droppers to the bus. I am using 1.5mm T&E for my bus, but solder just refuses to stick to bus wire. At the moment I am resorting to wrapping the dropper around it and then coating the dropper with solder, all the way round so it cant fall off, but I realized that this won't be a good connection. Now I think I am doing it right, I heat the area on the bus wire that I want to tin, and then offer some solder to it. It just wont stick :twisted: .

bigbob
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Re: Soldering

Postby bigbob » Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:24 am

Bus wire isn`t get hot enough, you need to heat the wire so its that that melts the solder not the iron!

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Bufferstop
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Re: Soldering

Postby Bufferstop » Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:33 am

Although the bus-wire is similar in cross section to the rail, it is made of copper which is a much better conductor (of both electricity and heat). You probably need a larger iron to get the heat into the bus-wire faster than it can conduct it away.
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Hulldude15
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Re: Soldering

Postby Hulldude15 » Tue Apr 06, 2010 2:58 pm

Bufferstop wrote:You probably need a larger iron to get the heat into the bus-wire faster than it can conduct it away.


When you say larger, do you mean bigger wattage? What sort of iron should I get for this job? At the moment, I have a really cheap iron off ebay, which I think is 30W.

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Speed Whisker
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Re: Soldering

Postby Speed Whisker » Tue Apr 06, 2010 3:09 pm

The tip needs to be large enough for a start. I would've thought 30 watts is OK. The thing to remember with soldering is that you have to heat whatever you want to join together up to the same temperature as that which melts the solder. Then those items will absorb the melted solder. Larger items will take longer than smaller items to heat up so a larger tip will be necessary and you'll have to apply the iron for longer.
Also, make sure that the surfaces you wish to solder are clean and bright as opposed to dirty and dull.
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Zunnan
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Re: Soldering

Postby Zunnan » Tue Apr 06, 2010 3:38 pm

Use IDC cable crimps for joining droppers and BUS. Car audio parts are great, solder free, you don't have to remove any insulation and they are rated to carry immense ampage at low voltage which makes them ideal. I used car audio cable throughout my DCC wiring and haven't looked back :wink: I think a lot of 'off the shelf' DCC wiring kits are based on this approach actually.

Hulldude15
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Re: Soldering

Postby Hulldude15 » Tue Apr 06, 2010 3:51 pm

I'm thinking about snap-lock connectors. I'm using 1.5mm T&E cable. Which ones would I order from here?: http://www.rapidonline.com/Cables-Connectors/Connectors-Single-Pole/Splices/Snap-on-and-mid-way-wire-connectors/72345/kw/Splice+connector

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Flashbang
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Re: Soldering

Postby Flashbang » Tue Apr 06, 2010 4:02 pm

Hi According to my conversion chart 1.5mm2 wire is approx. 15AWG
So in that case, you would use the Blue connectors. :D
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Zunnan
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Re: Soldering

Postby Zunnan » Tue Apr 06, 2010 4:07 pm

THIS PAGE is very handy in sizing up what cables need what crimps.

1.5mm T&E comes in between 14 & 15AWG, so use connectors that cover this range. Droppers may well be too small to get to bite properly however so may require stripping back and the bare conductor folding a few times before inserting into the crimp and closing.

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Bufferstop
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Re: Soldering

Postby Bufferstop » Tue Apr 06, 2010 5:00 pm

Hulldude
I'd go along with the snap-lock connectors, great if you can't turn the board over and would have to solder upside down. You said what did I mean by a bigger iron before you had said yours was 30W. Think of the iron in three parts, the element, the body and the tip. The shape of the tip determines the ability to get heat into the work piece, the body acts as a heat reservoir, and the element is the source of the heat, its wattage determines the speed with which the heat builds up when switched on, then recovers after you have made a joint. When trying to solder to a good conductor, you need a flat area on the tip to transfer the heat, and a body which stores enough heat to make the joint. You say your iron is a cheap 30W one, then in it's likely that the body is too light to hold enough heat to make the join to the bus-wire. Irons that are used all day long generally have a heavy body even if they are low wattage, it means that they loose very little temperature whilst making a joint. If you go to one of the big exhibitions get the tools catalogue from Squires, there's a whole range of irons to choose from. (Squires shift so many tools by mail/fax/phone order that they haven't had time to think about a website)
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Hulldude15
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Re: Soldering

Postby Hulldude15 » Tue Apr 06, 2010 5:39 pm

Flashbang wrote:So in that case, you would use the Blue connectors.


Any of the blue connectors? There are 3 types! :)

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Re: Soldering

Postby Flashbang » Tue Apr 06, 2010 6:24 pm

Hi
They all do the same job, but each in a slightly different way!
My choice would be to use 33-0139 but its up to you! :D

As already stated, while the Blue connector is ok for use on 1.5mm2 wire, the dropper wire running off to the rail is normally of a much smaller wire size. The snap connectors are designed to accommodative two wires (one through wire and one tapped in) of similar sizes . In the Blue connectors case between 18-14AWG. So if your droppers are say 16/0.2mm (Approx 22AWG) that on its own is too small as the take off wire, so you will need to double or even perhaps treble up the wire by folding it on itself in the area of the connector to allow the insertion cutter to grip onto the wire.
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Hulldude15
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Re: Soldering

Postby Hulldude15 » Wed Apr 14, 2010 4:24 pm

Do you have to expose the metal part of the wires or can you keep the plastic on? I bought some off ebay and I'm not sure if I am using them correctly.

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Speed Whisker
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Re: Soldering

Postby Speed Whisker » Wed Apr 14, 2010 4:45 pm

The only wires I've ever seen where you need to leave the plastic insulation in place before connecting the plug are telephone wires which are extremely thin. As you close the plug the teeth inside the plug cut through the plastic to make contact with the copper wire inside.
To answer your question: I would say yes, strip the wire first if you're crimping the connectors on.
Why are the locos I want, in the liveries I want, always either non existent, out of stock, discontinued or collectors club only/limited editions?

I used to be with it, but now what I'm with is no longer it and what's it is somehow strange and confusing.


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