Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Have any questions or tips and advice on how to build those bits that don't come ready made.
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TimberSurf
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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby TimberSurf » Wed Aug 30, 2017 11:47 pm

Finally have all the right bits in for the next project. Chain link fencing.
After much research and lots of umming and arring about what material to use for the posts, brass or plastic, I decided that plastic was too flimsy and brass too expensive and hard to work with! Why? because I need to drill little 0.8mm holes in it to attach the barbed wire along the top!
But after a lot of putting off making them, I recently accidentally found a supplier who not only produces a kit (all of which I consider too much money per meter to buy) but also sell the posts on their own. I couldn't resist purchasing 100. So now construction begins. First, a test of weathering (painting rust on) to the silver fence material I bought 12 months ago. I have plastic and steel to try. I have painted all the 100 plywood posts. Tonight, I have cut the fence and glued a few posts to it. When the glue dries, I will mount it and see how effective it is. Pics to follow. {100 posts x 8ft = 800ft = 3.2meters on the layout}
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Atso
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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby Atso » Thu Aug 31, 2017 9:35 am

Sounds like you've managed to come up with a good cost effective solution to the fencing issue. Is the chain link fencing itself metal? If so have you thought about using a blackening fluid on it? I picked up some Carr's blackening fluid for nickel silver and found it works just as well on brass, although you do need to make sure that the metal to be treated is free of any dirt and grease for it to work though - and don't leave it exposed to the fluid for too long as you can get some unexpected and unwelcome results. It does look good though and this is how I'm doing the coupling hooks and chains/screw links on my locomotives and wagons now.

Looking forward to seeing the pictures of the fencing. :)
Steve

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TimberSurf
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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby TimberSurf » Thu Aug 31, 2017 12:50 pm

The mesh is actually plastic, super fine so very realistic, and like gossamer, so you can barely see it! Just very realistic as at OO scale the real thing would be almost impossible to see. I also have some stainless steel mesh, to try, but I think it will be nuts to cut and will be very chunky compared to the plastic. I will make up both and we can decide from the pictures. I have yet to develop the best/quickest methodology for construction (and installation), glue, spacing jig, cutting method, etc, etc. The successful winner will become a Lumsdonia top tip on my website!
P.S. I have not found a source of brass mesh, fine enough for my exacting standards.
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TimberSurf
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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby TimberSurf » Thu Aug 31, 2017 10:08 pm

OK, done sooner than I thought!
Chain Link fence Posts.jpg
Chain Link fence Posts.jpg (43.58 KiB) Viewed 275 times

Mass painting


Chain Link fence Stainless steel.jpg
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Chain Link fence Stainless steel 2.jpg

Stainless steel mesh, 8in square not too bad to cut with scissors


Chain Link fence Nylon.jpg
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Chain Link fence Nylon 2.jpg
Chain Link fence Nylon 2.jpg (52.26 KiB) Viewed 275 times

Nylon mesh, 6in by 10 meter roll, has to be laid on masking tape to enable cutting

Barbed wire is 6lb fishing line
Touched up with rust (paint)

What is more realistic?
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Bufferstop
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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby Bufferstop » Thu Aug 31, 2017 11:18 pm

My vote would go to the nylon, purely on the basis of being able to see through it. If it looks right, it is. I've used something similar "Bridal Veil" cut from a roll. Before using it I dipped it in a tray of very dilute brown poster paint, then allowed it to dry. Colours it without clogging the holes.
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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby HarryR » Sat Sep 02, 2017 12:09 pm

I'd vote for the nylon too, tho I think the wire mesh could have its uses elsewhere, "security fencing" perhaps?

Atso
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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby Atso » Sun Sep 03, 2017 12:48 pm

Another vote for the nylon here!
Steve

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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby TimberSurf » Tue Sep 19, 2017 10:51 pm

And next a top Lumsdonia Tip! This one works really well.
I was scared to glue all the posts and lamps/height gauges/water cranes to the base board, for fear my clumsy elbows would inevitable smash them down with irreparable damage. So applying the same principle as my removeable buildings/platforms/bridges etc, I devised this.
Essentially, don't glue the item down, instead, drill a hole in the base board. Insert and glue some plastic tube (namely plastic cotton bud stem) into the hole, ensuring it is at right angles to baseboard (insert a cocktail stick as a temporary post). Now carefully drill a 2mm hole (true) up the post for 10mm. Cut a cocktail stick short and insert pointy end in post (glue not needed) and insert assembly into sleeve of the hole.
Tip 803 Height gauge assembly.jpg
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Tip 803 Height gauge hole.jpg
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Tip 803 Height gauge insertion.jpg
Tip 803 Height gauge insertion.jpg (47.25 KiB) Viewed 202 times
Tip 803 Water crane insertion.jpg

If you should accidentaly smash into it, just replace the cocktail stick! :)
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Mountain
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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby Mountain » Wed Sep 20, 2017 2:35 pm

Genius! Well done with the cocktail stick idea. Also I prefer the look of the nylon mesh. :D

m.levin
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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby m.levin » Thu Sep 21, 2017 2:23 am

You could also trim down some of the large base's, that are made big for stability.
What about using a strand from 2.5mm flat twin & Earth? This would give some flexibility if you don't get a perfect inline hole in item or 90' hole in base board? you could strip the cable back to the copper strand or leave the coating on?
Also if you knock it the copper would give before the plastic.

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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby TimberSurf » Fri Sep 22, 2017 8:28 pm

m.levin wrote:What about using a strand from 2.5mm flat twin & Earth?
Yes that would work, not sure about keeping the insulation, although JFYI, 2.5mm copper cable is not actually that diameter, so holes would have to be smaller (2.5mm is the CSA).
Next to be solved is telegraph poles, these are only 3mm in diameter to start with! Drilling the hole would be fun!
Maybe needs opposing principle.
Might try sharpening with a pencil sharpener, thus can be "jammed" into hole, so no need to glue, but easily knocked out of its socket, without damage?
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railwayjim
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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby railwayjim » Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:12 pm

My choice is the nylon material as well, looks spot on to me.

Iv'e done a similar thing with my telegraph poles when fitting them.

First drill a hole in the baseboard 5mm deep, slightly wider than the pole
then insert a plug of blue tack in the hole, this holds the pole in place, but
allows the pole to be knocked without it breaking, it just leans over, as the
blue tack has give in it.

Jim.

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TimberSurf
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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby TimberSurf » Sat Sep 23, 2017 11:33 pm

I tried my pointy pole (sharpened in a pencil sharpener), but although it does indeed spring out when hit, it is also a sloppy fit and won't stay upright. So I attempted to drill out a telegraph pole and surprised myself and managed to drill a hole relatively straight :o . So I have glued some copper wire in it and will try it out tomorrow.

I kept aside a lot of till paper roll cores, many years ago. They were set aside as a very useful source of plastic tube. I recently decided to utilise and used the fact that there are two diameters, one that slides inside the other. First chamfering the end of the larger size with a file, while rotating it in a cordless drill, held on a former (part of a toothbrush handle), then parted off a short length. This was then glued onto the end of the thinner size, to form 3ft diameter concrete pipes. A quick paint later and they look the part.
Concrete pipes lin tool.jpg
Concrete pipes unpainted.jpg
Concrete pipes unpainted.jpg (20.77 KiB) Viewed 118 times
Concrete pipes complete.jpg
Concrete pipes complete.jpg (32.51 KiB) Viewed 118 times
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m.levin
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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby m.levin » Sun Sep 24, 2017 10:30 am

Smart idea and good use of waste.
Do you plan to put on as a load?

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TimberSurf
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Re: Lumsdonia R&D Dept Workbench

Postby TimberSurf » Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:06 pm

This thread is for the testing bed that comes from my skill building (via experience) and my idea's. So making the pipes was essentially an experiment to see if the idea works (looks realistic/any good). So far most of the idea's work, but I am not afraid to put in the failures and blunders as a warning to others to not make the same mistake. Although the pipes are maybe a little thick and chunky (not perfectly to scale) they do look the part (the right impression is whats important ("Lumsdonia aspirations" level 6). So initially I will use as a stock pile at the maintenance depot, currently being built (see main Lumsdonia thread), but some may be fitted to wagons as loads (the first type of many more to come, as I have a great passion for making loads, inspired by a well known individual from the Liverpool MRS, who regularly shows off his work and methods at exhibitions) and in the future I definitely want a Roadworks scene with pipes below the layout surface in a trench.
I only used about 6 rolls and have dozens more, so many more production runs can be done in the future, now the technique has been perfected.
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