CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Have any questions or tips and advice on how to build those bits that don't come ready made.
GWR_fan
Posts: 4893
Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2012 11:57 pm
Location: Antipodes

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby GWR_fan » Tue Aug 19, 2014 4:24 am

3D printing is obviously a 'new' direction in the hobby. A generation ago I remember a friendly discussion with a then quite elderly modeller. I always admired his modelling skills and thus felt the regular urge to discuss the hobby with him. When he was a child his access to modelling was basically old steel nails for axles found on his way to school or old baked beans or sardine tin cans to cut up for bodies.

At an advanced age he ventured away from 'h.o.' modelling towards 'O' gauge and made the most beautiful models from scratch, even though he had the worst case of 'DTs' I had ever seen (he used to own a country pub).

The advent of 3D technology is certainly the 'way of the future' for the small volume manufacturer or the computer skill gifted modeller who wants something unusual to model. I will watch in earnest any developments in this thread.


Tim

timbologist
Posts: 362
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:39 am
Location: Hazeldene Victoria Australia ( in the bush )

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby timbologist » Thu Aug 21, 2014 12:26 pm

Thank you GWR_fan for the implication I might be a Gifted modeller, but alas I am not gifted. Computer Skills have come from working with and playing with for 40 years, especially the Cad/Cam side of it.
And Again with the modelling been doing that for over 40 years stating in model cars and planes. I still have on my desk a very good selection of micro-strip and plastic sheet that I still regularly use.

Anyway today like to show you a bit about the software used to generate the Code the printer actually uses, this is called G code the same as used in most CNC machines.

The first image is the simulation of the part to be printed, this shows the completed job, which in this case is a new Tudor building tile.
The second image shows how I can switch to show a single layer only so I can check for areas that may have problems.

images 3 and 4 show a couple of the pages where I set up some of the printing parameters for example the nozzle dia and how wide I want the extruded noodle. and the thickness I want the noodle.
But also I can tell the printer on different layers to behave differently.
For instance for bulk filling I can set the the nozzle to 0.24 wide and layer of 0.2 mm, them when I get to the layers where fine detail stars I can set the the noodle width to 0.15 mm and a layer height of 0.05 mm.

Or I can have multiple models on the machine at the same time and print them with individual settings.
Some of the settings can be changed on the printer as the print is progressing IE temperatures of the extruded plastic, the actual flow rate of the plastic, the temperature of the bed and the actual print speed.
this allows fine tuning as the print progresses.

That's enough for today

SIMPLIFY3D.jpg
image 1 screen of the simulation of print
SIMPLIFY3D.jpg (146.21 KiB) Viewed 2601 times


SIMPLIFY3D-01.jpg
image 2 single layer
SIMPLIFY3D-01.jpg (172.87 KiB) Viewed 2601 times


SIMPLIFY3D-02.jpg
image 3 extruder page
SIMPLIFY3D-02.jpg (162.8 KiB) Viewed 2601 times


SIMPLIFY3D-03.jpg
image 4 layer page
SIMPLIFY3D-03.jpg (186.96 KiB) Viewed 2601 times

timbologist
Posts: 362
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:39 am
Location: Hazeldene Victoria Australia ( in the bush )

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby timbologist » Wed Aug 27, 2014 2:51 am

Well today shall get deep and meaningful.

Image 1 shows a generic set up of the hot end extruder for a 3D filament printer. this is the same setup I use.
starting at the top you have the entry point for the filament which is feed from a roll, usually 1 kg rolls.

The filament is drawn into the extruder drive between a fine toothed drive wheel and a bearing, the bearing is spring loaded to exert pressure on the filament to ensure it stays in contact with the drive wheel.
this particular drive has a reduction between the stepper motor and the drive wheel. this allows a finer feeding of the filament especially required when using fine nozzles as I use.
if using the direct drive setup you end up with spluttering, which looks ugly.

When it exits the extruder it feeds into the cold end of the hot end ( sounds double dutch ) the top 80 % of the hot end needs to be kept well below the melting point of the filament, or it will get to soft and won't feed to the nozzle end.
The bottom end holds the heater block, thermistor and the nozzle, just above the heater block is a narrow section called the heat break that stems the flow of heat from the bottom end to the top end.
The plastic becomes molten in the area just inside the nozzle exit hole.

As far as My Loco goes have not touched it, as I have been busily designing new tiles for building Tudor Style Buildings which will be available under the ScaleCast brand.

Below is a couple of facebook pages where you can follow what I am doing.

and the third link is where most of my items are available

https://www.facebook.com/Linkamodelsau
https://www.facebook.com/Minibuildings

http://www.linkaonline.co.uk/


Hope all this makes some sense to you, if not please ask questions.


EXTRUDER-HOTEND-SETUP.png
image 1 extruder hot end set up
EXTRUDER-HOTEND-SETUP.png (143.97 KiB) Viewed 2560 times

timbologist
Posts: 362
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:39 am
Location: Hazeldene Victoria Australia ( in the bush )

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby timbologist » Fri Aug 29, 2014 12:18 am

Today back to model making,

In the last post mentioned about the Tudor style tiles I am working on for ScaleCast, in the attached images are 4 views of the prototype of a Tudor Shop made from these first tiles.
All the tiles have been printed on my 3D printer, the finish is as is of the printer, giving a rendered effect. To keep in context this is a model of a building that is around 500 years old.
Which means it has lost it's made yesterday look, and when you browse Tudor style buildings some of then look pretty ordinary, having gone all out of shape and the finish looks like it has been re-done may times over the years.
As far as printing goes the first 2.25 mm was printed at a layer height of 0.2mm this is the base area of the tile with a width of 0.2mm. The height from 2.25mm to 3.0mm was printed with a height of 0.1mm and a width of 0.17mm, as the timber sections are 0.5mm and 1mm wide
The timber height is 0.75mm which is 2.25 inches which is probably over scale, but I have less chance of getting the black in the wrong places, As I only painted the front of the timber not down the sides. I may back this of to 0.5 mm on the final patterns. After I get some feedback about how it all looks. so if you have any thoughts about it please share them.

The model is made up from over 40 separate parts, made from ABS plastic and glued together with a mix of Acetone and scrap ABS.


P8280021-800.jpg
image 1 the Tudor shop front view
P8280021-800.jpg (511.31 KiB) Viewed 2529 times


P8280022-800.jpg
image 2 the Tudor shop back view
P8280022-800.jpg (520.38 KiB) Viewed 2529 times


P8280023-800.jpg
image 3 the Tudor shop another front view
P8280023-800.jpg (449.24 KiB) Viewed 2529 times


P8280024-800.jpg
image 4 the Tudor shop side view
P8280024-800.jpg (686.77 KiB) Viewed 2529 times

timbologist
Posts: 362
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:39 am
Location: Hazeldene Victoria Australia ( in the bush )

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby timbologist » Tue Sep 30, 2014 2:44 am

Sorry but it's been 4 weeks since I have added anything, but life always keeps you busy.

I have been working on finishing this model to get patterns made.
And have made a new improved hot-end for the printer as I was having troubles with the 0.2mm nozzles and the higher temperature.
I am actually working on a 0.1mm nozzle, so probably create more problems to solve.

Referring back to a previous post with the diagram of the extruder setup, what is not shown on that diagram is there is a PTFE liner that is inside the hot-end
that gives a thermal barrier stopping the filament getting to hot before it gets to the nozzle and getting out of shape.
But at 250 C the PTFE gets out of shape.
So the new setup has no PTFE tube but uses Stainless Steel tube instead for the body. And has a heat break as it comes out of the heater block, and reaches the heat sink.
in my case the id at the heat break is 1.85mm and the od is 3mm so the wall thickness is about 0.5mm.
So when running the heater block is 250 C and the heat-sink which is about 2mm away you can hold you finger there all day as it is just warm.

As you can see by the results of this mucking around the effort is wort it.

The next problem to solve is to make my own nozzles as these are currently air brush nozzles, and don't have a very big area at the nozzle outlet,
which is not good for large flat areas. as you need a larger contact area to smooth out the previously laid plastic, a bit like a bulldozer.

But here is the finished Tudor shop I have been working on in its full glory.

except for the roof which is cast in plaster using Linka moulds the rest is made on the 3D printer.
Each part of the walls are made out of separate tiles glued together.

The files for the patterns to make the moulds from have been sent to Shapeways to be printed, so the moulds can be produced.

The tiles are then cast in plaster very much the same as the Linka moulds, but have no fingers at the joints just nice straight edges.
The chimneys and ridging will be available in plastic as will the window frames

cheers for now

I'll post images of the mould layouts and the patterns in the next post.

P9290032.JPG
TUDOR SHOP
P9290032.JPG (172.86 KiB) Viewed 2427 times

P9290033.JPG
TUDOR SHOP
P9290033.JPG (167.11 KiB) Viewed 2427 times

P9290034.JPG
TUDOR SHOP
P9290034.JPG (164.37 KiB) Viewed 2427 times

P9290035.JPG
TUDOR CHIMNEY POT
P9290035.JPG (158.9 KiB) Viewed 2427 times

P9290036.JPG
P9290036.JPG (158.87 KiB) Viewed 2427 times

User avatar
skyblue
Posts: 1745
Joined: Sat Aug 18, 2012 11:17 am

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby skyblue » Tue Sep 30, 2014 10:03 am

Wow - that's great - in particular the chimney pots and the ridge on the roof.

User avatar
glencairn
Posts: 2693
Joined: Sat Aug 30, 2008 6:09 pm
Location: Both sides of the Border

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby glencairn » Tue Sep 30, 2014 1:37 pm

skyblue wrote:Wow - that's great - in particular the chimney pots and the ridge on the roof.


I second that. Excellent!!!

Glencairn
To the world you are someone. To someone you are their world.

timbologist
Posts: 362
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:39 am
Location: Hazeldene Victoria Australia ( in the bush )

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby timbologist » Sun Oct 05, 2014 12:26 am

Firstly thank you to Glencairn and skyblue for your comments good to see there are not just Lurkers out there.

A bit of topic more of a ready to run repair.

I just bought on Ebay a Hornby Coronation Class the City of Bristol which had a broken Loco to tender hook as seen in picture 1.

I tried the easy way out and put another pony truck under it ( it's the same as that under the old tender drive Scotsman )
But the tender hit the Loco on the Tight radius on my inner most track.
So I better fix the broken one and add a bit to the length about 1/8" or 3.25mm.
Picture 3 truck with the new hook ready to install.
Pictures 4 and 5 show the repaired pony truck ready to fit back to the Loco

And it works perfectly and does not hit anymore.

The printer and the cad package have over the last 10 months become an essential part of my tool box.
not only for designing and manufacturing new models for my layout, but repairing just about anything.
I don;t know what I did without it.


PA040038.JPG
picture 1
City of Bristol broken hook
PA040038.JPG (134.67 KiB) Viewed 2384 times


TENDER-HOOK.jpg
picture 2
cad drawing of new hook
TENDER-HOOK.jpg (128.16 KiB) Viewed 2384 times


PA040040.JPG
picture 3
new hook next to pony truck
PA040040.JPG (156.77 KiB) Viewed 2384 times


PA050041.JPG
picture 4
repaired truck
PA050041.JPG (138.31 KiB) Viewed 2384 times


PA050042.JPG
picture 5
repaired truck
PA050042.JPG (136.02 KiB) Viewed 2384 times

User avatar
flying scotsman123
Posts: 2048
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2012 5:29 pm
Location: err, down there round the corner... not that one!!!

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby flying scotsman123 » Sun Oct 05, 2014 1:11 am

Hi, great work, apologies if you've mentioned this, but what printer and software are you using? It all looks great anyway, I'd love to have a go at 3D printing, but the cost is still a little to prohibitive for me at the moment, I'm only 15 after all! Hopefully as I grow older prices will come down - Please!

Impressive stuff, but the fact you use it to make things like new tender hooks really does show that it can solve anything really.
"listen carefully, i shall say this only once"

Image

ParkeNd
Posts: 1395
Joined: Sat Oct 12, 2013 5:48 pm

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby ParkeNd » Sun Oct 05, 2014 9:35 am

The modeling is positively inspired - glad you are not being put off by the predominance of lurkers - I wonder what they look like?

3D printed items look fragile - are they?

timbologist
Posts: 362
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:39 am
Location: Hazeldene Victoria Australia ( in the bush )

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby timbologist » Sat Oct 11, 2014 7:43 am

ParkeNd wrote:The modeling is positively inspired - glad you are not being put off by the predominance of lurkers - I wonder what they look like?

3D printed items look fragile - are they?


Lurkers are a strange breed, I have no idea what one looks like.

The 3d printed models are fairly strong, in there own right, but compared to something that is injection moulded out of the same material there not as strong.
Because injection moulded the material is one liquid mass, where as the 3d printed is a hot layer placed on top of a colder layer, ( liquid over solid ) so you rely on
the penetration into the previous layer and the last sausage you laid.
So they are plenty strong enough for model making, and always pass the drop test with flying colours.

Also I'm glad the modelling is inspirational.


flying scotsman123 wrote:Hi, great work, apologies if you've mentioned this, but what printer and software are you using? It all looks great anyway, I'd love to have a go at 3D printing, but the cost is still a little to prohibitive for me at the moment, I'm only 15 after all! Hopefully as I grow older prices will come down - Please!

Impressive stuff, but the fact you use it to make things like new tender hooks really does show that it can solve anything really.


The cad software is called Rhinoceros 3D, the software to convert the model to the G Code for the printer to use is called Simplify 3D
And the printer is called a Hadron, which is just the bare printer frame, the electronics are the Arduino/Ramps set-up the Extruder is a modified Wades and the Hot-end is my own design.

I think you can print most things, if you can draw it you can print it.

My printer is an essential part of my modelling arsenal.

And best thing of all is you can solve the problem 24 hours a day without leaving the comfort of your house.

timbologist
Posts: 362
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:39 am
Location: Hazeldene Victoria Australia ( in the bush )

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby timbologist » Tue Oct 14, 2014 10:55 am

Hi all, well at the week end did a bit of loco bashing, which involved a little bit of 3D printing.

In Australia they have just recently released the Great British Locomotive Series, with those plastic models on a display track.

Being a gluten for punishment ended up buying 6 of number 1 and 3 of number 2, well at A$5.95 for the first and A$9.95 for the second, why not.

The attached photo's show the results of the first one I have attacked, the bodies appear to be a very good copy of the Hornby model, a few minor differences.
Only the rivet counters would worry about. I have major thing I am going to fix and that is the leading truck needs to go forward 3mm and the front axle needs to be
another 6 mm forward of the rear axle, as you can see looks a bit odd.

Before you ask the chassis is from a Hornby A3 Gordon from the Thomas range.

And before you say it's all wrong then look at the very early Hornby A3's and Coronation's they use the same loco chassis for both and the early Coronations are about 5/16" shorter.

So if its good enough for Hornby and modellers of years ago it's good enough for me!!!!!! :)

The enjoyment in this hobby is doing what you want and using your own imagination not what the so called experts say you should or should not do.

So let yourself only be limited by your own imagination and your own fulfillment and not that of others.


PA140047.JPG
CORONATION MOUNTINGS
PA140047.JPG (158.04 KiB) Viewed 2296 times


PA140045.JPG
CORONATION REAR MOUNTING
PA140045.JPG (138.91 KiB) Viewed 2296 times


PA140046.JPG
CORONATION FRONT MOUNTING
PA140046.JPG (155.13 KiB) Viewed 2296 times


PA140048.JPG
CORONATION LOCO
PA140048.JPG (170.08 KiB) Viewed 2296 times


PA140049.JPG
CORONATION TENDER
PA140049.JPG (170.27 KiB) Viewed 2296 times

timbologist
Posts: 362
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:39 am
Location: Hazeldene Victoria Australia ( in the bush )

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby timbologist » Tue Oct 21, 2014 9:51 am

Hi all

Well finally finished the second Tudor building, made from mostly 3D printed components.
The roofs are Linka R2 roof tiles cast in plaster and the chimney and the brick side walls are Linka B1 tiles cast in plaster,
The gutters are formed foil and the down pipes are copper wire, All the rest is printed in ABS plastic.

More about the availability of the moulds and other products to produce these models can be found at the below address

http://www.linkaonline.co.uk/store/c26/Tudor_Products.html

Currently working on a second motorization of one of the Magazine Loco's the first one Mallard, so will have details of that and what I needed to print to get it together

That's all for now



PA210107.JPG
Front
PA210107.JPG (163.5 KiB) Viewed 2268 times

PA210108.JPG
right
PA210108.JPG (162.5 KiB) Viewed 2268 times

PA210109.JPG
back
PA210109.JPG (168.13 KiB) Viewed 2268 times

PA210110.JPG
left
PA210110.JPG (164.33 KiB) Viewed 2268 times

PA210114.JPG
front bricks
PA210114.JPG (168.12 KiB) Viewed 2268 times

nickbrad
Posts: 829
Joined: Fri Jan 15, 2010 11:53 am
Location: Lincoln, UK

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby nickbrad » Tue Jan 13, 2015 1:16 pm

That is some amazing work, really show the potential for 3d modelling.

If you need suggestions for a commercial loco kit, I'd suggest 0-4-2 Lion, as featured in The Titfield Thunderbolt. The original kit has been out of production for many years and prices top £200 when they do become available now. :wink: (I'd love one myself)

User avatar
End2end
Posts: 3920
Joined: Sun Jan 12, 2014 9:58 pm
Location: At the end....... and sometimes at the other end

Re: CAD 3D PRINTING MODEL MAKING

Postby End2end » Tue Jan 13, 2015 1:26 pm

Lurking learner linka modeller reporting for duty. :lol:
Love the Tudor shop and house.Very elaborate, great stuff!
As for 3d printing? Way out of my league and frame of reference lol
Thanks
End2end
"St Blazey's" - The progress and predicaments.
Welcome‎
Planning
Building
St. Blazey's Works & Depot thread


Return to “Scratch and Kit building”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests