BR/SR Steam Loco Workbench - H,G6,0458

Have any questions or tips and advice on how to build those bits that don't come ready made.
User avatar
deeftrundle
Posts: 174
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 10:03 am
Location: Ormskirk, Lancs

BR/SR Steam Loco Workbench - H,G6,0458

Postby deeftrundle » Thu Jan 31, 2013 9:09 pm

I am a loco modeller recently returned to the sport after some decades in what is known as the "real world". I have been advised to create my own thread to describe my pathetic attempts. This is probably a ruse to keep me from filling up other people's threads with rubbish. A good move I think. This thread is aimed at the "new modeller" like myself to discuss beginners' problems which the more experienced already have "in the bag".

To begin with, last year, I decided to continue where I left off kilomoons ago, modelling BR Southern Region in the mid-fifties, ie early crest territory. "Not another Southern bigot" I hear. Well yes, although being from Liverpool the reason escapes me, but I've started so I'll finish. For those not interested they should turn off now.

Ultimately I hope to build a layout, probably loosely based on Saarf London, but at the moment I am concentrating on building up livestock. Kits, conversions and mash-ups are my current pet projects, and to kick things off I have decided to document the building of a resin model on an RTR chassis. I have done a couple of them but the H class is the only one for which I have full photo history.

I must warn you I have been away from the table for a long time, so some of my methods may seem antiquated, even idiotic. Feel free to put me right where necessary. I am no skilled artisan, but I do have enthusiasm and persistence.

So the first loco is the Wainwright H class built from a resin body from CRLBK Models on a modified Hornby/Triang M7 chassis (Ultimately I will attempt to build my own chasses, but for now this is beyond my current capability). I will be going into quite a bit of detail, mainly for my own use and records. I have worked for a long while in the software industry where we were taught to "document what you do, and do what you document". Old habits die hard.

For those of you still awake, here is the eBay promo photo of the resin body:
Image
This is not the first CRLBK resin model I have tackled, having already built an 0458 "Ironside" Saddle Tank on a converted Bachmann Percy. I must say I was disappointed in the quality of the H resin body - one of the buffer beam corners was chipped, the whole thing was slightly out of square, the cab floor (part of the resin kit) did not fit nicely onto the chassis, and so on. Maybe I was expecting too much, certainly the body on the 0458 was much better but in thicker resin. There might be a lesson in there. As I am likely to move onto Golden Arrow kits, perhaps there is someone out there who can put me straight on "resin model quality", and "limiting expectations".

Here is the H body as it arrived:
Image
It came with 2 other resin pieces: a cab roof+sides piece and a cab floor, but more on those later. It also came with various white metal pieces: boiler backhead, footsteps, sandboxes, bogie assembly, steam reverser and push'n pull equipment. I decided to build one of the minimalist H's so the push'n pull bits were redundant.

The body kit instructions come in the form of 3 A4 sheets, describing, in text and diagrammatic form, what mods are needed to the M7 chassis, how to construct the bogie, and where the white metal details go on the body. Again my experience is limited but these instructions seem to be minimalist, but by no means nihilist.

I bought my body kit "new" on eBay.

The M7 chassis is the Hornby/Triang R754 (not the later Hornby DCC Ready M7). I had one of these knocking round from back when, but I have seen them on eBay relatively cheap. Here is one:
Image
Those Triang geeks out there will recognise the motor as the X04.

Apart from the body kit and the chassis, the additional pieces required to complete the thang are: replacement driving wheels, bogie wheels, handrail and knobs, clack valves, smokebox darts, buffers, lamp irons, vacuum pipes, couplings of choice. All these will be described later. Just a note on the couplings, the body kit is promoted as having accommodation for NEM couplings - barely - like a BMW Mini has accommodation for a snow plough fitting.

I also decided to replace the safety valves, which I feel do not come out very well on the resin moulding. If I were CRLBK I would omit them from the moulding and leave them for the modeller to add.

One could also be picky and dispense with the white metal footsteps and steam reverser for nice brass ones. In retrospect I wish I had.

As for the sandboxes, they are for me as good as useless. They are too clunky, almost impossible to glue onto the body, and even if they had stuck would have clashed with the chassis when adding/removing the body. So I decided to 86 the sandboxes. One day, if I ever see any suitable slim ones, I may buy and fit them. Maybe CRLBK could include thinnish ones as part of the moulding - just a thought.

Anyway, enough of this rabbit for now, time to watch some footy with a glass of vino.
The next post will be a discussion of the chassis changes.
Don't all hold your breath.
Last edited by deeftrundle on Sat Apr 27, 2013 12:03 pm, edited 6 times in total.

User avatar
mattmay05
Posts: 1954
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 4:16 pm
Location: Isle Of Wight
Contact:

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby mattmay05 » Fri Feb 01, 2013 11:48 am

seen these on ebay, but were put off by the difference in size, plus the H-Class has been looked at by a manufacturer, and could be possibly released this year.

User avatar
deeftrundle
Posts: 174
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 10:03 am
Location: Ormskirk, Lancs

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby deeftrundle » Fri Feb 01, 2013 1:59 pm

I just wanted a resin model I could get my teeth into.
What do you mean by "difference in size" ?

User avatar
deeftrundle
Posts: 174
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 10:03 am
Location: Ormskirk, Lancs

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby deeftrundle » Fri Feb 01, 2013 3:59 pm

H Class, Part Uno: The Chassis

Chassis modifications were pretty straightforward. They consisted of
1. hacking off part of the chassis front
2. replacing the plastic chassis extension at the rear with the new supplied resin one
3. replacing the bogie with the new supplied assembly
4. replacing the driving wheels

The tools I used for the project were as follows:
a hacksaw, a dremel with grinding and drilling bits, a set of mini/micro files, a set of MicroMesh sanding pads, various screwdrivers, various tweezers, cocktail sticks, big bowl of patience, swear box


1. Chassis Front
Modifications just entailed the hack removal of a piece of chassis block approximately 11mm from the front, leaving the two front lugs. A hacksaw was used while the chassis was anchored in a vice. The CRLBK diagram for this is as follows:
Image
The 2 lugs secure the front of the chassis to the body, so do not hack them off as well, or you will be up it without a paddle.
Here is a before/after scenario. Note that the "before" chassis (on the left) was not the one actually used in my project but another (unhacked) M7 I have. At some stage Hornby must have changed the sizes of the lugs because the ones on the hacked chassis (on the right) are slightly smaller than those on the unhacked M7.
Image
Here are the holes in the body into which these lugs fit. These are not there when the kit arrives, but have to be "punched out" of the resin with a sharp stick and then smoothed at the edges with a mini file.
Image

The distance from the driving wheels to the buffer beam on the H is considerably shorter than that on the M7. The upshot of this is that it is impossible to mount a NEM 362 coupling pocket on the front because there is just not enough room. This was one of the reasons why I decided to forget the push'n pull version and just put cosmetic couplings at the front. This loco will therefore only pull stuff!
CRLBK have added a NEM 363 mounting block on the resin body immediately below the front buffer beam. This is a bit of a failure for 2 reasons, the first being that the moulding is so coarse that a NEM fish-eye pocket just does not fit into it, the second being that the pocket (therefore the coupling) would protrude so far that it would look ridiculous. So the crux of the biscuit is that I knocked NEM on the head frontwise.

For those interested the NEM pocket/coupling standard (with dimensions) can be found here http://www.doubleogauge.com/standards/couplings.htm

2. Chassis Rear
Modifications at the back entailed removing completely the plastic chassis extension which housed the firebox glow gubbins - there is no firebox glow on the resulting H class I am afraid. The electric feed to the firebox glow must also be disconnected of course.

The M7 chassis extension is connected to the chassis by one screw. To remove the extension this screw must be undone, and retained to connect the new H cab floor to the chassis. In effect we are just replacing one chassis extension with another less complicated one.

It is best to disconnect the firebox glow wires first. This just means unsoldering the leads from the motor brushes which go to the firebox glow. There are 2 of them, one black and one red. Here is another before/after image showing the chassis with and without the chassis extension and firebox glow.
Image
Now is a good time to make sure the little chap still runs on a track. If it doesn't, you are on your own.

The next photo shows the chassis without and with the replacement cab floor (part of the resin kit). I had to do a lot of filing and grinding of this resin piece to make it fit snugly onto the chassis, and to get it level. I also had to raise it slightly on one side by inserting a snippet of thin plasticard, thereby preventing the body from leaning to the right when connected to the chassis.
We will deal with this "final" connection later.
Image

The CRLBK diagram for this cab floor fitting is as follows:
Image
CRLBK advised gluing the boiler backhead to the cab floor. I gave this advice a wide berth since the place to glue it is directly over the securing screw. Hmm. This meant that it would be impossible to unscrew the cab floor from the chassis in the future, for whatever reason - there is bound to be one. I think a better idea would be to glue it to the inside front wall of the cab.

For those eagle-eyed, you might have noticed that there is also a spring, supplied in the kit, at the very rear. This I think is intended to stabilise the bogie (not shown in the diagram). But what do I know ?

3. Bogie
CRLBK supply the bogie in white metal as part of the kit. This replaces the M7 bogie which is too long. It is connected to the chassis using the same bracket as the M7 bogie, which is nice.

Here is a top down view of the M7 bogie and the (finished and painted) shorter H bogie. It is connected to the chassis with a single brass screw. Again, do not lose this, or drop it onto a short pile carpet in a dark room.
Image

So how is this H bogie built ?
The full gamut of bogie parts can be seen here:
Image
All these parts were part of the CRLBK kit apart from the bracket which connects the bogie to the chassis (the 3rd item down), and the wheels.
These wheels were 14mm diameter 10-spoke jobs sourced from Markits, product code BR14BS. They cost me £3.84 a hit.

The white metal body parts had already been painted (Citadel Chaos Black) before this photo was taken.
The holes (1.5mm) had to be drilled to accommodate the bolt.

The spring item at the top of the photo is that mentioned in the previous section. It is fixed to the cab floor by the screw which holds the cab floor (and therefore by definition the chassis) to the loco body.

Here is the CRLBK diagram explaining how the bogie is assembled.
Image
The diagram explains how a gap has to be cut in the bogie white-metal sides to make them "see through". I found this a bit tricky and it was done by drilling a couple of holes into the metal and then making the holes bigger using a mini file. I reckon I was lucky not to break the bar across the top of the hole. The bogie main frame and its wheel supporter had to be filed extensively to remove flash before they formed a snug fit. Some filing was also needed to allow the wheels to run freely within their "compartments". As mentioned already, it was then painted before final assembly. No glue was involved in the making of this bogie, so it can be disassembled at any time if need be.

As far as the NEM pocket plug is concerned, excuse me while I make an embarassed cough. The "plug" is not capable of holding a NEM 363 fish-eye block. The white metal just does not have the detail. Even if it could accommodate a fish eye block, the NEM pocket would stick out too far beyond the rear buffer beam, like the situation at the front of the loco but not quite as laughable. I have yet to resolve this issue, but I am determined to have a NEM coupling at the back somehow. I will not give in.

4. Rewheeling
The driving wheels on the H have a smaller diameter to those on the M7, so re-wheeling was the order of the day.

I have to admit I cheated with this process. Graham Quinn, who does loco repairs and servicing for Southport Hobbies, told me he had some suitable drivers (22mm 16-spoke) so I was cheeky and asked if he could do the rewheel for me. He did.

I have no idea what the rewheeling process entails. I just left it with him and it got magically done. Graham said it is pretty straightforward with the right tools. This is just another thing on the "must learn" list, which grows longer by the day.
You can of course see the results of the rewheeling in the above photos.

Phew. The next post will discuss detailing the body.
Last edited by deeftrundle on Sat Feb 09, 2013 7:57 pm, edited 3 times in total.

User avatar
deeftrundle
Posts: 174
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 10:03 am
Location: Ormskirk, Lancs

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby deeftrundle » Sun Feb 03, 2013 6:43 pm

H Class, Part Deux: The Resin Body

There are 3 resin pieces in the CRLBK kit: the cab floor chassis extension, the cab and the main body.
I showed you the cab floor in the previous post.

The cab piece is not the whole cab, but just the upper part, i.e. 4 walls and a roof. When the kit arrived, the cab had 4 round windows each of which were still covered in a thin layer of resin. These had to be "punched out" and then filed for neatness.
Here is a photo of the cab piece post-punch, and with a whistle added on the top for good measure.
Image

Although the body comes pretty much complete, it has to be "tidied up", and holes drilled before it can be detailed. On my instance some of the edges were a bit ropey, not all were straight, and some of the surface was slightly bumpy. Consequently I was not totally happy with the final paint. I don't know whether this is typical of all mouldings, or just the one I bought.

The front looks like this:
Image
As you can see, there are various dimples in the resin ready to be drilled before gluing on the details.

The 2 front lug holes can also be seen where the chassis plugs in. Like the cab windows these must be "punched out" and the edges smoothed.

The rear view looks like this:
Image
After looking at historical pictures of the H class, I noticed that the middle row of lamp irons were definitely higher than the hole dimples on the resin body, so when it came to drill them I drilled them much nearer the top middle one. The bottom ones looked to be acceptable.

At both the front and rear, a dimple was there ready for some sort of link coupling. I plumped for cosmetic 3-link screw couplings to be added after the buffer beam paint. No allowance is made for other buffer beam fruit salad, e.g. vacuum pipes, steam pipes etc. Looking at photos, every H seemed to have a different combination.

Below you can see the bunker/cab area of the model.
Image
The cab flashing had to be cut away with a sharp craft knife along the dotted lines marked in brown (these lines were not on the actual resin model of course).

I had flirted with removing the cab door flashing as well (marked in blue dotted) and maybe adding doors myself, but decided to leave that flashing on, i.e. fixed doors.

The resin cab piece is designed to be glued on the bunker later. This gives the opportunity to add detail inside the cab and glaze the windows if required beforehand. In my case I decided not to add any internal detail but to glaze and to glue the boiler backhead to the front wall of the cab piece before gluing it in place. Luckily it turned out to be Mr Snugfit.

The safety valves have been marked on the photo because I decided to cut them off and replace them with brass ones. At first I experimented with 2 individual valves, and these can be seen on some of the photos, but eventually I finalised on Wainwright Ramsbottom valves, and these gave an accurate representation according to the original H photos I had.

Here is the side area of the body requiring detailing, basically forward of the tank:
Image
There are 2 dimples ready for handrail knobs and 2 dimples (one on the boiler, one on the splasher) for a clack valve. Both sides have these 4 dimples.
On the right hand side only (the side shown in the photo) there are also 2 dimples for the white metal steam reverser.
The area below the boiler just behind the splasher (marked Side Flashing in dotted blue) should strictly be cut out because on the real H there is daylight when viewed from the side. When mounted on the chassis however, the brass worm of the X04 motor would be visible. I did not particularly want to see this, so I decided to leave this flashing in place. Others may wish to remove it.

Under the body the only modification is the drilling of a hole to take the securing screw for the cab floor and chassis. The CRLBK instructions suggest that the existing screw (used to secure the M7 chassis extension) can be re-used, but this screw requires a receiving thread which the resin body does not have, so I decided to use a self-tapping screw instead. In this next shot you can see where I drilled the hole, there was a dimple there for it:

Image
Here is a shot of the chassis secured to the body and the screw partially tightened.
Image
In the final analysis, the bogie stabilising spring would also be held by this screw.

What remains now is to add the details, paint and line.
In the next post we will see what detail was added and where.
Last edited by deeftrundle on Sat Feb 09, 2013 8:09 pm, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
mattmay05
Posts: 1954
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 4:16 pm
Location: Isle Of Wight
Contact:

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby mattmay05 » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:47 am

looks pretty good so far... appart from what the hell is that on the roof of the Cab... if your going to say a whistle....then... yea bit large...

User avatar
OliverSR
Posts: 171
Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2010 6:23 pm
Location: Tewkesbury
Contact:

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby OliverSR » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:02 pm

Looking good, I have considered that kit myself but I am too much of a cheapskate and I have a big que of projects to work through anyway.
Despite not being a perfect model it is pretty close and to most will look like the the H Class. And I would think it is easier to make than a brass kit and is cheaper so it is good from that point of view.
What livery do you intend to do it in when it is finished?
OliverSR

User avatar
sleeper
Posts: 308
Joined: Sun Nov 13, 2011 12:00 am
Location: Exoudun, France

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby sleeper » Mon Feb 04, 2013 4:07 pm

Well done Deef, a nice informative 'how to' post. It's a pity there aren't more of them on here.
I've always been of the impression that resin bodies look a bit 'fuzzy,' no crisp detail so to speak. I will definitely be following this one to see how it turns out, it's looking mighty good so far.
well done mate

User avatar
deeftrundle
Posts: 174
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 10:03 am
Location: Ormskirk, Lancs

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby deeftrundle » Mon Feb 04, 2013 4:43 pm

Whistle, yeah, good innit ?

Matt
I ordered some "SR whistles" ages ago and this is what came. I was going to explain this in the next post.
If you could point me to a source for the correct ones for SECR I'd preciate it.
Thanks for the comments. I am afraid I am nowhere near your amazing standard.

Oliver
I model the early/mid fifties so it will be Mixed Traffic Lined black.
Luckily this period didn't go big on multi-colours and I don't think I will have to model many greens, they have all been done as rtrs.
The body is currently painted, so now it needs the buffer beams painting, then I will line it.
I use self-designed transfers for mixed traffic but will explain this in the relevant post.
Thanks for the comments. I always look out for your thread additions.

I was beginning to think I was the only reader of this thread. :D

In writing a subsequent post for cab glazing, I have just deleted the draft of my next post which described adding the detail pre-paint. Rats.
It will now be several days before the next one I think.
Last edited by deeftrundle on Mon Feb 04, 2013 7:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
mattmay05
Posts: 1954
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 4:16 pm
Location: Isle Of Wight
Contact:

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby mattmay05 » Mon Feb 04, 2013 7:25 pm

Well that isn't an SR whistle I cannot tell you where thats from as ive never seen one that big. Theres some available from Markits... but I brought some spare old hornby Brass turned ones for my locos and then reprofiled them to suit my needs. You can see these on all the Resin P-Class Ive made an the Wills H-Class.

Image
Image

User avatar
deeftrundle
Posts: 174
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 10:03 am
Location: Ormskirk, Lancs

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby deeftrundle » Mon Feb 04, 2013 10:02 pm

H Class, Part Drei: Pre-paint Body Detail

Having drilled, ground, hacked, filled, sanded and swore, I was now ready to put some meat on this bone.

It's a shame there isn't a web site where I could just plug in "4mm H Class 31500" and it spat out all the bits I would need, where I could get them, and how much it would cost.

31500 is the BR number I had chosen to model. I had a couple of photos of it, thanks to this reference site. I hope they don't mind me showing it here ...
Image
This, and other H photos, helped enormously in attempts to remain true to life.

The CRLBK instructions for detailing the body are not extensive, but then again they don't really have to be. Here is what you get ...
Image

For gluing, I use Loctite Ultra Gel Superglue (or cyano as the Yanks like to call it). I squeeze a bit out onto a bit of scrap paper then use a cocktail stick (without the cocktail) to dab it sparingly onto the target piece. I usually put glue onto the item being stuck rather than into the hole. I know many people have their own preferences in this department, but I have found gel easier to work with and it seems to give me just enough manipulation time before my fingers get permanently attached to the model.

Most items were fixed to the body before painting, since they were going to be black anyway. I decided that only the buffer shafts, handrail and other buffer beam furniture would have to wait. Brass items got dunked in "Carr's Metal Black for Brass" for 30 secs, but in all honesty I had mixed success with this.

Smokebox Darts
The first detail to add was the smokebox handles, so I invested in a set of brass smokebox darts from Eileen's Emporium (product code LF4SBD1) costing me £2.50.

They do not come assembled, are very fiddly, and the next item on my shopping list may have to be a proton microscope. Basically you have to thread the 2 handles onto a shaft and then glue the shaft into a 0.5mm hole Dremel-drilled in the smokebox.

After fixing the shaft, the handles continued to rotate, which was a bonus. Shame the door doesn't physically open, but for £2.50 what do you expect ?

Here is the item as it arrived from Eileen ...
Image

At this point I already wanted to see how it was taking shape, so here is a snap of 31500 running up and down my test track. I was painting the bogie at the time, so it is sans-bogie. Surprisingly it didn't go a-over-t. I tend to get paranoid during a project, constantly needing to make sure everything functions and checking that the glitch fairies haven't paid me a visit.

Image

Whistle
As mentioned in the last post I added a whistle to the cab roof, which would remain unattached to the body until near the end of the project. This whistle was ordered yonks ago and was advertised as a "4mm SR whistle" but definitely looks ridiculously big, as someone has already commented. Once I find where to source a proper SECR one for an H I will replace it.

Safety Valves
In the above photo you can see how I added a couple of individual safety valves. Unfortunately I was not happy with these, so immediately after I took this shot I replaced them with a single brass casting item from Branchlines (SECR Wainwright Ramsbottom safety valves, £2.80). It does look much better.
Image
To fit it I had to carefully grind off the resin safety valve base with the Dremel until I had a hole ripe for the new piece. I then blackened it with "Carr's Metal Black for Brass". It did fit very nicely but the vertical threaded bit within (good terminology eh?) protruded too far into the body and clashed with the X04 motor, so this bit had to be almost completely sawn off. It was then glued in place.

Handrail
It was decided to construct the handrail early on, but not to mount it until near the end of the topcoat paint. This was to be my first attempt at handrails.

I invested in the knobs from Eileen's Emporium: a pack of 12 long brass knobs (product code LF4HRK1), and a pack of medium knobs (product code LF4HRK2). Each pack cost £3.50.
Image
The wire was Gibson 0.45mm Handrail Wire (£3.55 for 10") from Mainly Trains and came in a straight piece, much easier to work with than a coil. Why do some manufacturers supply coils ? I reckon you always want to start with a straight.
The medium knobs (4 in all) were used around the smokebox door and on the smokebox sides. The long knobs were used near the tank. From BR photos, the handrail seemed to only be present forward of the tank. This meant less to botch.

I started with a piece of wire long enough for the whole handrail (and then added a bit for good measure). I then added some masking tape to one end and threaded the knobs on from the other end in the correct sequence: LMMMML. Another bit of masking tape on the other end meant that they acted as handles both during the bending process and the blackening/painting process, and also stopped the knobs from sliding off the wire. Threading the knobs was a real strain on the eyes.

I Dremel-drilled the 8 knob holes (0.8mm) in the body using the dimples provided.

Then I worked along the wire putting (but not gluing) each knob into the appropriate drilled hole in the body and temporarily taping them in place to prevent them from jumping out whenever you looked at them. Bending around the smokebox was a challenge to say the least but you have to get each bend fully formed and correct before moving onto the next. Once the handrail was complete and in place I just removed the tapes and the knobs popped out.

This was without doubt my least favourite task of the project, although the lamp irons ran it a close second.

I had been warned that the brass wire would not take paint (even primer) very well without being blackened first, so I had a go with "Carr's Metal Black for Brass". Here is the handrail before and after blackening.

Image
I then put it to one side and forgot about it until the paint process.

Clack Valves
After trawling the ads I finally plumped on the Markits SR Double Square clack valves as the most suitable, product code MCLACKsr, £3.67 each. I needed 2 of them for the H. Like the smokebox darts they come unassembled, in 5 brass parts plus a length of copper wire to represent the piping. They need a good smattering of patience and luck to assemble. Here is a photo of them finished:
Image
For each side of the boiler I Dremel-drilled 2 x 0.8mm holes to take the copper piping. One hole drilled horizontally is on the side of the boiler, the other is drilled vertically into the rear of the splasher. Both drill spots are well dimpled to help you. Luckily the clack valves fitted snugly into both holes without any need to bend the pipes off the straight.

Steam Reverser
The steam reverser supplied by CRLBK is a white metal item which is a bit clunky and needed a lot of filing and tarting up to look even vaguely presentable. In retrospect I wished I had used a brass one, which I have since bought and will use if ever there is an opportunity to replace the metal one in situ.

The one I have got for the future is from Branchlines: SECR Wainwright steam reverser in cast brass and cost £2.80. It still lives in its packet today. Here is a photo ...
Image

The next photo gives a good view of the white metal steam reverser and clack valve, right side. There is no steam reverser on the left side.
Image

Smokebox Number Plate
The smokebox number plate is nothing more than a sliver of the thinnest plasticard known to man. Approximately 1.75 x 7.5 mm (give or take a gnat's) it was secured temporarily to the end of a cocktail stick with bluetack, then glued onto the smokebox door, thereby hiding the upper horizontal door bracket.

After painting this will receive a smokebox number DIY decal, in the correct Gill Sans font.

Buffers
The buffer beams on the resin body were not as tall as they should be (I think). This meant that I had to source buffers whose shanks had lugs which were not too wide in diameter, otherwise the holes would have overlapped the bottom edge of the buffer beam. After hunting round I eventually found some buffers with shanks/lugs of exactly the right size as the dimples. Luckily they were also the right type for the H. The 1.5mm holes drilled into the beams accommodated them nicely.

These were SE/SECR Ashford brass sprung buffers from Branchlines (product code KM28) and were £5.85 for a set of 4.
Here they are glued on the front buffer beams.
Image
The actual buffer and shafts were not to be inserted into the shanks until after painting.

Lamp Irons
I checked out etched LSWR and LBSCR lamp irons from various manufacturers including ScaleLink and RT Models, but couldn't really find a good enough match for the H SECR ones visible in the photos, so I decided to spoof it with wire and/or Bambi staples.

The front footplate had dimples for 3 vertical lamp irons, and I just cut 3 equal lengths of Bambi staple and glued them into 0.8mm drilled holes. The top smokebox lamp iron is an L-shaped piece of Bambi staple glued into a similar drilled hole. The left and right smokebox irons are 2 x L-shaped pieces of nickel-silver handrail wire glued on (at the 137th attempt). Here are the results for the front ...
Image

The rear bunker lamp irons are similar to the top smokebox iron, 6 x L-shaped pieces of Bambi staple glued into 0.8mm drilled holes. When gluing, I laid a piece of thinnest plasticard across the bunker (above each hole) to prevent the staple going all the way in to the hole. This left the upper piece of each iron proud of the bunker. I felt pleased at that little scam - I am easily pleased.

Here are the results for the back ...
Image
These little varmints were annoyingly fiddly, and it would be really nice if some bright spark could come up with pre-made pre-bent lamp irons (for the various BR flavours) which just slotted into holes. Shimples.

I hear "but that would spoil all the fun". Yeah right.

Footsteps
The footsteps supplied by CRLBK are white metal. I wish I had invested in alternate brass ones, but when messing with footsteps I tend to lose the will to live, so I just used the ones supplied. They are always the first things to break or fall off. These ones needed a fair whack of filing and flash removal, but even after that they were still pretty uneven and knobbly. After this spruce up, they glued on surprisingly easily into slight recesses provided in the resin body, beneath the cab and just forward of the tank. You will see the results after painting, which highlights how grotty they are.

Here is an underview photo of the steps after gluing:
Image
In this view you can see how the body edges are far from parallel, the sides being noticeably bowed. Also you can see where I had to patch up the buffer beam in the bottom right corner where it was chipped. I used original Milliput for this - not my forte.

Sandboxes
As I ranted in my initial post, I have just not found a good and safe way of mounting the sandboxes onto the body without them falling off, either because there is just no good purchase point for them, or because they kept getting caught when a cack-handed brute like me removed the body from the chassis. So for this reason this H has no sandboxes. If anyone knows where I can get slimline ones with a hefty securing tab, let me know.

Right, so here is a view of the left hand side of 31500, with the cab in place (but not permanently), ready for painting.
Image

In the next post we will see how the painting went.
Last edited by deeftrundle on Wed Mar 13, 2013 6:18 pm, edited 8 times in total.

User avatar
Lysander
Posts: 2296
Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2007 9:53 pm

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby Lysander » Mon Feb 04, 2013 10:46 pm

An enjoyable tale - looking forward to your next installment.

Tony
Men with false teeth may yet speak the truth.......

User avatar
alex3410
Posts: 3401
Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2012 4:39 pm
Location: Essex

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby alex3410 » Tue Feb 05, 2013 11:58 am

thanks for sharing very interesting read

look forward to more updates

User avatar
deeftrundle
Posts: 174
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 10:03 am
Location: Ormskirk, Lancs

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby deeftrundle » Sun Feb 10, 2013 6:17 pm

H Class, Part Quatro: Painting

The livery of this chap was always going to be Mixed Traffic lined black. This was carried by H's throughout the 50's up to their ultimate demise. All my locos are from the 50's, thereby neatly side-stepping the Big 4 multi-coloured requirements.

I do all my paint spraying with cans (cans of paint, not painting while wearing headphones). I did invest in a cheap airbush a year ago, but have yet to take it out of its box. One day.

Before starting, I make sure the cans have sat on a radiator to warm up. Then they get a jolly good shaking for 2 mins. Then a quick burst to make sure the flow is buono. Then I am good to go.

For the undercoat I used Citadel Chaos Black. This is acrylic. All the articles I have read say use various flavours of grey, even red for undercoat, but a War Games modeller I know swears by Citadel foundation paints and his results are excellent. For my next paint job (a stripped down Finecast G6) I may just try Halfords Grey Primer. Hey, live dangerously.

I usually apply several coats of undercoat, but each of these is a single waft from left to right making sure the spray begins before it hits the model. That way I get a reasonable even covering. Here is the first coat to show what a waft is worth. I usually spray the left side, then the right side, then the top, holding the can 200mm (8" in old money) from the model.
Image
Although only the body is shown in this photo, I was applying the same coats to the cab piece at the same time.
I do the spraying in a cheap spray booth (balancing the model on a Tamiya Spray-Paint stand) and leave each waft to dry for about an hour in the booth, covered to prevent dust getting in. Many light coats are better than 1 heavy gooey one. Not shown on the photo is the fact that I did put a little bit of masking tape over the buffer shanks to stop any paint finding its way inside. Does anyone else find the Tamiya stuff a bit pricey ?

And here it is fully undercoated.
Image

For the top coats I use Halfords Satin Black (also acrylic). I have tried RailMatch Rail Black in the past, but it is more expensive, and I have yet to match my black decals to it satisfactorily.

I did mask over the buffer beams because they would of course be painted with red (I use RailMatch enamels) and I did not want to be painting enamel over acrylic top coat. This may well have not been an issue but I did not want to take the risk.
Image

I gave it 2 coats (slightly heavier than the undercoat wafts) of the Halfords Satin Black, then fixed the handrail to the body, having given that a couple of wafts of Citadel Chaos Black undercoat. Then I gave the ensemble a final top coat.

While I was in a painting frame of my mind, I gave a few coats to the boiler backhead. Then touched up a few of the controls with various weathering colours I had knocking around. It would later get glued to the cab piece.
Image

Here is the body fully overcoated, with the cab piece in place but not yet fixed.
Image
Image
I am not particularly happy about the overall finish, it was getting near the end of the Satin Black can, but it was more likely to be flaws in the resin finish which caused the disappointment. I wasn't going to start again though, I had come too far.

I drilled 1.2mm holes in the middle of the buffer beams for cosmetic link couplings before applying any final paint to the beams. Maybe these coupling types were too late chronologically for my period of the mid-fifties, but to be honest I am not that bothered. I like the look of them. The ones I use are Hornby X5069 in black, I got them from Lendons of Cardiff. Here they are ...
Image
I don't of course glue these on until after painting. Duh.

I then did some masking in preparation for doing the buffer beams. I always use RailMatch red. In previous experiments I found that Buffer Beam Red (code 305) was too orange, and Signal Red (code 400) was too red, so I decided on 2 coats of Buffer Beam red, followed by 2 of Signal Red. I find the RailMatch enamels to be pretty thin straight out of the bottle.

Here it is ready for the first red coat ...
Image

I have found that prior to use, the little pots of paint (e.g. Railmatch etc.) need to be "stirred and not shaken", otherwise any dry nasty stuff at the top of the pot gets introduced. I use a cocktail stick for this - I get through lots of these. I usually stir a pot for as long as it takes to listen to Also Sprach Zarathustra by Richard Strauss - the 2001 version not the one by Eumir DeoData, which funks along for 9 minutes.

Here is a snap of the rear buffer beam after the 2 coats of Buffer Beam Red.
To me it looks too orangey.
Image
I use the finest platypus hair paint brushes. Apparently one platypus is required to make 2 2mm brushes. They are expensive but I do think it is worth paying for the best, don't you ?

On then opening my little bottle of Signal Red I found it had solidified. Don't you just hate that?
As I use so little each time, I find this very annoying. The Buffer Beam Red is fine and I treat both bottles the same and use approximately equal amounts of both. Presumably some air must have leaked into the Signal Red. I came across these tips for painting which I have found useful, but not foolproof !!.

Two coats of Signal Red later, here it is ready for the final buffer beam details to be added ...
Image
I am not very enamelled with the masking (or in this case non-masking) along the top of the buffer beam. I might try to touch that up when I get more time.

Here is a nice sexy shot of the paints I used. I might enter this one into a competition.
Image

And finally, 31500 on the chassis (still with the mega-whistle) ...
Image
The next post will discuss adding the final detail and glazing the cab windows.
Last edited by deeftrundle on Wed Mar 13, 2013 6:22 pm, edited 3 times in total.

User avatar
deeftrundle
Posts: 174
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 10:03 am
Location: Ormskirk, Lancs

Re: BR/SR Steam Loco Noddy Workbench

Postby deeftrundle » Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:09 pm

H Class, Part Cinque: Post-paint Detail

Having survived the paint process mostly unscathed, I could now add the remaining detail.

Buffers
I decided to leave the buffers, which I am assuming are nickel silver, unpainted. So, all that remained was to assemble and mount them. Each buffer comes in 3 pieces: a shank, a head plus wire leg, and a spring. The shanks were glued to the body before painting, leaving each head and spring looking like this:
Image
Sorry about the blur, just can't get the staff.

Assembling them entailed no more than threading the spring onto the wire leg, but the springs are tiny so you may need a magnifying light. I did.
Once assembled, the wire leg (with the spring) is poked through the shank so that it protrudes behind the beam. Once you have made sure the spring mechanism works, the wire then gets bent behind the beam at the appropriate length.

Here is the front buffer beam, after fitting the buffers.
Image

Vacuum Pipes
Looking at the BR photos, the assortment of bits and bobs on the buffer beams is a bit bewildering. I decided to just put vacuum pipes on - a cop out I know.

I bought a job lot of Dapol vacuum pipes once, I think I paid £2 for 100 of them. I also have some nice brass ones but they seem to me a bit over-scaled so I plumped for the Dapol ones. Here are 2 examples:
Image
They are all slightly bent - I still haven't worked out why. I wanted straight ones so I unbent them. I fixed each of them to the appropriate buffer beam using the U piece at the end, gluing it into a very shallow slot I made on the bottom left edge. Here is the rear vacuum pipe in situ.
Image

Screw Link Couplings Pipes
These just slotted in. The fix was quite firm so I have not glued them in.
Here is the front one in situ.
Image

Glazing
I like to have my cab windows glazed. For me it just adds a little extra.
What I do is to glue perspex to a paper or card frame and then to glue that to the inside of the cab window, with the frame cabside.

For the H, the windows are circular, but the method I will describe works for any shape.

First I printed off the frame. I designed the one for the H with a CAD package but you could just as well draw it.
The inside of the frame is made slightly larger than the window opening. The frame itself is made 1mm wide.
Here is the PDF I produced. Although I only needed 4 windows I printed 8 frames in case of balls-ups.
Image
As you can see, to help in cutting out the frames I also printed crosshair guidelines for each window.

The insides of the frames were then cut out, and the edges of the holes were blackened with a permanent marker pen, leaving me with the following:
Image
You can see how neat I was with the marker, but it doesn't really matter because the paper around the frames gets discarded.

Had the windows (and thereby the frames) been rectangular I could have printed onto card and cut out the holes with a craft knife. But they were circular, so I printed onto paper and removed the round holes by folding each frame along a vertical guideline then cutting out double hemispheres of paper along the inside frame edge with sharp scissors.

I like my windows to be dirty. Simple perspex does not give me this effect so I use grimey perspex.
This is produced from a "grime.pdf" from ScaleScenes. It is free and downloadable.
Use this url to get it. If that has gone stale, let me know and I can send it to you. I am sure ScaleScenes would not mind.

This PDF then gets printed onto transparency paper. Here is a photo of what gets printed.
Image
With one sheet, you can glaze many many windows.

So, for my cab windows, I cut out a strip from this transparency just big enough to cover all the window frames at once, like this:
Image
Then I glued the grime transparency to my frames with UHU. The transparency has a rough side and a smooth side, and it is the smooth side which is facing up in the photo. So basically the rough side of the transparency was glued to the side of the paper which did not have the frames printed. I was then left with the blackened frames on one side, and the smooth glazing on the other. Like this:
Image

Now each of the windows was cut out and glued into the cab (on the inside).
With a pair of sharp scissors I cut around the outside of the window frame. I then cut a narrow strip of bog-standard masking tape and attached it to the frame, in the following manner:
Image
Then the window frame was carefully placed onto the model. For this I used tweezers. I looked at it from the outside to ensure correctness. When in place I made sure it was temporarily held there by pressing the masking tape.

Once the tape gripped I used the bottom edge of the frame as a hinge and, using a cocktail stick, folded the window back over the masking tape. I then put tiny droplets of Superglue on the reverse side of the frame, being careful not to get glue on the part of the transparency which would be visible from the outside. Then I flipped it back into place using the hinge as pivot, and held it until the glue droplets set, 10 seconds or so. I then peeled off the masking tape and Robert was mon oncle.

In this photo you can see (on the left) the "hinge" being used and (on the right) the window glued in place.
Image
This operation is a bit tricky, but is easier than just using tweezers or fingers. Any glue left around the edges of the frame on the inside of the cab can be touched over with matt black paint once everything is dry.

Here is the finished glazing of the H cab. It could have been neater but I prefer it to no glazing at all.
Image

Boiler Backhead
Before the cab could be glued onto the body, I had to glue the boiler backhead to the front wall of the cab. This is my alternative to the CRLBK instruction to "glue it to the chassis", which prevents the cab floor of the chassis from ever being disassembled. In this next view you can see the screw (the nearer one) over which CRLBK suggests gluing the backhead (the farther screw is the one securing the X04 motor to the chassis).
Image

Gluing the backhead to the cab piece (instead of the cab floor) was a bit tricky
so I drew some guidelines on a bit of paper to make sure I glued the backhead to the correct spot.
Here is the guide drawing and below it the cab piece and backhead ready for gluing.
Image
You can see how the cab piece is anchored with 2 pieces of masking tape,
as is a piece of temporary plasticard used to raise the backhead to the correct height.
This stops the cab piece from moving away when you try to glue the backhead to it.

Here is a closeup after gluing.
Image

At this point the cab piece (with backhead) could have been glued to the body,
but mine was a nice tight fit, so I have left it removable. I may glue it in place when
I get round to adding the coal to the bunker.

NEM Couplings
Although unsatisfactory to me, I have added a NEM 362 pocket to the loco rear as suggested by CRLBK.
This entailed hacking away a Dapol fish-eye type pocket so that it fit (sic) into the opening at the back of the bogie.

Here is the hacked pocket (above) and an unhacked one (below). It is a difficult to see any difference but quite a lot of plastic has to be shaved off.
Image

I glued the fish-eye piece of the pocket to the bogie, making sure the pocket height was correct by using a NEM gauge (available from Symoba).
Image

When the bogie is reconnected to the chassis, you can see how far the pocket sticks out beyond the buffer beam. To me this (~3.5mm) is unacceptable, but there you go.
Image

As I mentioned in an earlier post, the sticky-out-ness at the front is even more severe, so I haven't even bothered with it.

So, here it is before being numbered and lined, which will be the subjectof the next post.
Image


Return to “Scratch and Kit building”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests