New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

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Daniel
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New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Daniel » Wed Dec 02, 2020 11:36 am

The framework is identical to the one used for the Valkenburg diorama so again 80cm X 120cm.

ImageP1190187 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageP1190188 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

(viewtopic.php?f=5&t=55917)

It is inspired in an old postcard from an old French village and if I manage to recall where one of both is (the postcard or at least the village) I'll let you know.

No running trains but there will be at least a truck or two carrying a portable railway across the scene.
That is all I know. The rest I will learn underway assiting my hands at doing whatever they do.

Because this will be my first thread in this forum not related to work already done, it will be, in comparison with my other threads, a slow motion one wich you may enjoy more than my usual flooding the screen.

I would have prefered to use the blue styrofoam as I used in other layouts, but I didn't want to expose myself traveling as sardines in the full ferry during covid second round peak so I am using the old expanded polystyrene.

This time I started by laying a piece of paper on the baseboard and doing a fe rough lines following what I can remember of the lost photo situation.
Then I started cutting a 2cm thick plate of the foam as to 'separate'the baseboard top that will be the water surface and the terrain around

ImageIMG_0006 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

I also use a common cheap hobby knife and also these two tools because I have them but one could do it with just the knife and the finger tips as well with no problems:

https://www.proxxon.com/en/micromot/27080.php

https://www.proxxon.com/en/micromot/27082.php

ImageIMG_0007 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0008 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0009 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

At first I only hold the different layers and pieces of foam with bits of tape so no glue yet until I like what I have done enough to stamp it's passport

ImageIMG_0010 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0011 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0012 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0013 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0014 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0015 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0016 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0017 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

It may seem I have 'modelled' the foam to sugest certain ground or rock surfaces but is not so yet. The 'serrated' surfaces and edges are simply product of my ijnpatience and not allowing the hot wire to take it's time. But I don't care because all those surfaces are going to get a plaster layer or may be even plaster bandage. The only important thing at this stage is to determine the areas and their volumes without entering in details.

At this point I decided to give what had been done a go so everything was taken from the baseboard, the original paper layer removed and all p[ieces laid again in their places, this time with glue.
I had no more silicone kit at home so I used super-fast PVA and when it run of it I continued using the super-strong version.
(A modeler is not someone that 'needs this or that' but one who model with whatever he has. :wink: )

ImageIMG_0001 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0002 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0003 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

As you can see, I sanded a bit the serrated surface of the ramp and the upgoing street but that will be modelled later with plaster. Now I focus on the general structure and volumes.

ImageIMG_0004 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0005 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0006 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0007 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0008 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0001 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0002 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0003 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0004 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0005 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0007 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0014 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

More tomorrow or next day.

Daniel

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Bufferstop
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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Bufferstop » Wed Dec 02, 2020 1:42 pm

A well designed and built baseboard there, if I may say. The extra depth that plywood for the sides and cross members adds massively to the strength and ridigity. Our local model railway club has made many "crush barriers" to protect its layouts at exhibitions, 20cm deep by two metre long pairs of 6mm ply faces joined by a top rail and vertical spacers of square section stripwood and mounted on square section tube supporting legs. Almost the identical construction they use for the long side frames of their bigger layouts. By lashing together adjacent pairs of the inverted "T" legs, to extend the old adage they are using "Belt, Bracers ANDGaffer Tape"
Growing old, can't avoid it. Growing up, forget it!
My Layout, My Workbench Blog and My Opinions

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Stainsacre
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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Stainsacre » Wed Dec 02, 2020 2:59 pm

Thanks Daniel, I have purchased a front row seat

Daniel
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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Daniel » Wed Dec 02, 2020 3:18 pm

Dave

Hmm... Are you the bald one with the big head that doesn't let me see what is this all about? :o :) :D :lol:

Daniel

Daniel
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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Daniel » Wed Dec 02, 2020 3:19 pm

Bufferstop wrote:A well designed and built baseboard there, if I may say. The extra depth that plywood for the sides and cross members adds massively to the strength and ridigity. Our local model railway club has made many "crush barriers" to protect its layouts at exhibitions, 20cm deep by two metre long pairs of 6mm ply faces joined by a top rail and vertical spacers of square section stripwood and mounted on square section tube supporting legs. Almost the identical construction they use for the long side frames of their bigger layouts. By lashing together adjacent pairs of the inverted "T" legs, to extend the old adage they are using "Belt, Bracers ANDGaffer Tape"


Oops...!!! :oops: I wanted to answer your post and touched the wrong icon so if police arrive looking for you say it was my mistake.

Thank you.

Yes, the vertical ply plates form everywhere a T with the top so the whole thing is pretty strong also if made with really very light wood.
Not as nice to see as a complex origami but same concept for stregth and very effective. I can lift it up with two fingers.

Now the whole thing must dry because has got already the full layer of plaster bandage.

Daniel

Daniel
Posts: 826
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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Daniel » Thu Dec 03, 2020 4:44 am

You...lazy people...! It's 5 in thge morning and I have been working for two and a half hours already and I hear jou still snoring!

Anyway: work in slow motion (ma non troppo) is going on.


Yesterday I couldn't wait so started applying the plaster bandage layer...


ImageIMG_0001 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

... it is a not expensive material and great to work with. It comes in several withes and lengths and one must learn the own preference. I like something from 7 to 10cm.

I start cutting enough(*) pieces in arbitrary lenghts:

ImageIMG_0003 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0004 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

(The photo shows the first cuts but before I started to apply them I jhad cut five times as much or so.)

Then I made a mix of gray latex wall paint, acrylic ocker paint (simply because I had those and wanted a bit of limestone colours even if almost nothing of this layer -if something- will remain visible.) and water:

ImageIMG_0002 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and began to submerge (one by one as I applied them) the pieces of bandage in the coloured water during a couple of seconds ensuring that it gets really totally wet and then laid it on the terrain.
In some places the bandage was extended perfectly flat, in other places folding or agglomerating the bandage to fit the situation:

ImageIMG_0005 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0006 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0007 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0008 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0010 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0011 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

If the bottom of the water areas is not going to be modeled but just painted, it would be much better to let the baseboard MDF top expossed since it ensures a perfectly glad surface. That was not my case so I cpovered everything except the areas where I already know there will be a row of houses and trhe area where a stone wall will come...

ImageIMG_0012 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0013 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0014 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0015 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Next photo show the uncovered area where the row of houses will come...

ImageIMG_0016 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and the next theplace for the stone wall...

ImageIMG_0017 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0018 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

----------------------

Well, it is easy to write 'slow motion' but when the wave comes one can't stand still on the surfboard and tell it 'Wait a few hours' or so...

ImageIMG_0001 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel



______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

*: 'Enough' is an euphemism because I couldn't know in advance how many I would need, but even if one cut too many they may be kept safely in a plastic bag for years without problem ... as long as they don't get wet.

Daniel
Posts: 826
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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Daniel » Thu Dec 03, 2020 4:55 am

(No, no: the only time I stood on a surfboiard was in my imagination but I still have my unicycle.)

Now you see a thin layer of plaster being added.
It was prepared with the same water as for the bandage.
Sometimes I add a bit ( or a lot, depending on the requierements) of PVA glue to the water so once settled the plaster will be much stronger. But now I have no idea of what am I going to do so I prefer to let it be soft enough for cutting or whatever.

ImageIMG_0002 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0003 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on

FlickrImageIMG_0007 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0008 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0009 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0010 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The colour will be a lot lighter once dry and any way most of it will be covered some way, but I want to avoid that if accidentally damaged some of the plaster white shows.

More tomorrow.

Daniel

Daniel
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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Daniel » Thu Dec 03, 2020 1:35 pm

It's dry now so work can continue...

ImageIMG_0002 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0003 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

Daniel
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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Daniel » Thu Dec 03, 2020 10:45 pm

Let's start building.
Hier de old stone wall in 6mm foam half way in the process of scribing

ImageIMG_0021 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Some points I like to care about are:

1) Hier and there some stones must have gone missing.
2) As much as possible, te contour of a stone must avoid following the contour of the other stones arround it.
3) The smooth top of the foam must be altered as much as possible making some stones protrute and other recess and in a later stage also the surface of the stones must have a bit of variations in their texture (grain)
4) there must be in such an old wall some less old repairs done with different types of stone, bricks or whatever.

ImageIMG_0022 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0023 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0024 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0025 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0026 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The reason for using 6mm and not 10mm foam that would give more relief is that the wall must stay flexible to follow the curvature of the terrain. 10mm foam won't allow me to do that in such a small radius.

ImageIMG_0027 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

It is just pined for the photo but must undergo several stages before can be glued in place.

ImageIMG_0028 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0030 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Yes, specially the top stones look ridiculous thin but that won't be noticed once the terrain cover part of it and the greenery the rest.

ImageIMG_0031 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

This is acrulic paint applied with a hard brush so to get it at the bottom of the groves

ImageIMG_0033 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Gray added to other spots because such an old wall shows great variation from black to white depending on the weather but also the materials.

ImageIMG_0035 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

so also black, specially at the bottom line and at the top but later also where the missing stones

ImageIMG_0037 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

At this stage it is unimportant if the stone's top surfaces are coloured or not but anyway some paint cover8ing the foam will help later the pastel powders to etch.

ImageIMG_0038 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0039 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

And that was it for today.

More tomorrow.

Daniel

Daniel
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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Daniel » Fri Dec 04, 2020 10:53 am

Well, the paint on the stone wall is now dry so I am going to play a bit with colours.
I like to build up colourwork combining the properties of the material's surface with sucessive layers of acrylick paint and dry pastels en stick form and also in powder form.

Because pastels are all about tones and shades, one gets very soon to a point where a certain 'order' is needed and for that reason I've built a simple rough storage box with drawers made from old boxes:

ImageIMG_0001 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0002 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0003 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

That way I can keep most pastels separated by colour but have also a couple of empty drawers so I can keep apart the range of colours I am using for one or more ongoing projects...

ImageIMG_0004 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Now a days you can buy a whole range of nonsense stuff for every single activity but I've found that the cheapest Chines pig hair brushes are the very best for working with pastels on models. I always have a few sizes with their hairs shortenned to different lengths so I can use them to rub the pastel pigment into places where my finger tips couldn't reach...

ImageIMG_0020 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Last night I gave a layer of three colours acrylic paint and now am going to use colours and shades to fifferentiate every area and every stone.

I pick a generic 'limestone coloúr' pastel stick as in the photo...

ImageIMG_0006 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

It doesn't look so but it was a round stick and the flat sides were caused for doing what next photos show: I simply lay the side of the pastel on the wall and start to drag it around so to give the whole a base colour...

ImageIMG_0007 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Of course, it will only leave it's trace on the top surfaces...

ImageIMG_0008 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0009 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0010 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Then I rubb the whole with the tip of myt fingers and the pastel begins to work together with the base paint...

ImageIMG_0012 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0011 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

You see, it is no more the base paint colour but neither the pure pastel but a blend of both.

The rubbing, if done with a moderated pressure, colours also a bit of the the sides of the groves separating the stones and that is great: the groves look thinner and the stones show more their volume.

--------------

This morning there was a little accident here and the whole baseboard with the terrain fell from the workbench to the floor.
I though it would be plenty of damage but it was just a little bit at one corner:

ImageIMG_0047 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

--------------

We go on with the colouyr work:

ImageIMG_0014 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

More in a moment.

Daniel

Daniel
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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Daniel » Fri Dec 04, 2020 11:36 am

ImageIMG_0015 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Why pastel stick and not powder?

Because sticks contain more and stronger binder and at the edges it won't get the protected situation at the bottom of the groves.

ImageIMG_0017 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

... but just rubbing with the fingers the traces of pastel on the top of the foam won't colour apropriatelly the groves so powder is also needed...

ImageIMG_0018 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0019 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

This was the fingers rubbing...

ImageIMG_0021 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and now the powder:

ImageIMG_0022 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0023 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0024 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0025 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0026 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0027 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


----------------

ImageIMG_0028 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Darkening the holes can be done with powder...

ImageIMG_0030 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

but I like to add also some stick black at the edge for rubbing it down as water would do letting it's dark traces of mud downwards...

ImageIMG_0031 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0032 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0033 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0035 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The variations of sam approach here and there...

ImageIMG_0036 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


One must be careful because too soon on think the whole thing is covered but see what the translusence of foam can cause:

ImageIMG_0037 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Depending on what you are building that may be a problem or not.
In this case the wall is going to be glued to a solid block of styrofoam too massive to allow any light through. But if you are building a house with 6mm foam you better should choose foamboard withch has a layer of papers on both side. Removing the paper of the outer side allows you to carve stones or whatever you want but the remaining layer of paper at the inside -eventually painted dark if there will be too strong interior lighting-
will solve the translusence issue.

ImageIMG_0039 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0040 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


It is not heretic to give adyacent stones exactly the same colour, tone and shade. Still, two stones rarelly show something like that: they are all different except when selected on purpose.
In my case, from the heart of organic architecture, walls were built with the stones closer to hand reach so no exquisite selection.
That means one must keep an eye on constant variation. But since one region or area commonly offers one or two types of rocks, a general base color is there. Conclusion: plenty of very subtle variations needed.

ImageIMG_0041 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0042 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0044 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0045 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0046 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0049 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

I always compare a piece of colur work under different lighting and also with different light fall ...

ImageIMG_0050 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0056 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

... because -just as in a group of people- every angle has something important to tell...

ImageIMG_0058 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0059 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0060 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Now will look pretty ugly for a while (as your beautiful girl friend during the early '60s receiving your with the rollers in her hair... :lol: ) but tomorrow will look better...

ImageIMG_0062 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0063 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0064 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0065 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

ImageIMG_0065 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

B.tg.w.: those plants were just for the photos so don't worry, it won't be a Disney show.

More tomorrow.

Daniel

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TimberSurf
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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby TimberSurf » Fri Dec 04, 2020 12:17 pm

I can honestly say I have never bought plaster bandages! I have used every conceivable other method, (http://www.lumsdonia.co.uk/terrain.html) from wall paper pasted paper on chicken wire mesh, through pink plaster and J-clothes with PVA! But I have to say my recent method is the one I love, using polystyrene as the structure and an equivalent to Sculpta mould (home made from plaster and liquidised tissue paper). Seen being used here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzAgMFCj3_U, I am currently doing exhaustive testing of ingredients, so that I can make an authoritative video on how to make your own! I don't consider plaster bandage or scultamould, cheap, when you end up buying it in bulk! (or am I just a cheapskate?)
Image
Lumsdonia <--- Hit link to go to my website for full story and wiring advice!

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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Ex-Pat » Fri Dec 04, 2020 1:00 pm



A basic "idiot's" question Daniel, is any liquid involved, or do the powders just manage to adhere on their own?

Daniel
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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Daniel » Fri Dec 04, 2020 4:15 pm

Ex-Pat,

How could an honest question be idiot?
Of course it is not!

Normally, artists use to spray a fixative on the pastel traces to ensure adhesion.
Art students, with their probably low-budget, use the cheapest range of hairsprays for that.
I have been using pastels for modeling for thirty years now and also if at the begining used the expensive artists quality fixatives, later jumped to cheap hairspray. (It is a rule: cheaper ones contain more adhesive and less fragance.)

What I dislike of fixatives and hairsprays -the cheapest or the most expensive of both- is that:

a) they tend to darken the colours (the expensive ones a bit less than the cheapest ones, but they all do.)

b) they 'flatten' the naturly 'airy' presence of the pigments.

Regarding the darkening the best alternative I know is to airbrush a very thin layer of acrylic matt varnish on.
But I use it nearly never.

If you use pastels for weathering your locomotives, which are going to be touched pretty often, it will affect the pigment so it would be better to airbrush the acrylic matt varnish so to seal it.

The case in what I am making in this thread is different: it is not probably that anyone will touch the foam wall once everything is done and, even if that hapens, there is no chance that the fingers will reach the bottom of the groves in the foam where the powder pigment is.

Most important for me: as you know I am not trying to builkd things for keeping them nor for selling but just for the joy of making them. Once they are done and I have shared photos I don't care much about and mostly my builds are cannibalized for getting all what can be recycled in a next project. So I have always a couple of cheap hairspray cans at home but mainly for fixing foliage in model trees.

All that said, when I use pastels (sticks or powder) if it is possible I rub on it with my fingers or with a hard shorthaired brush. That pushes the pigment into the pores of the material and that helps a lot.
Of course, with styrene or other really smooth materials that doesn't work.

Daniel

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Re: New 1/32 Diorama but this time in slow motion

Postby Ex-Pat » Fri Dec 04, 2020 4:30 pm

Thanks Daniel - most enlightening.


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