Tips on using real coal required please

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Ex-Pat
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Tips on using real coal required please

Postby Ex-Pat » Sun Feb 12, 2017 5:04 pm

I’ve just broken up a lump of coal, and can’t get over how much dust there is.

I’m very interested to know how you all go about using it. For example:

Do you wash it to get the dust off?

Or do you use the dust as a “sprinkle”?

What sort of glue do you use? (PVA or what?)

Any other tips gratefully received – thanks in advance.

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flying scotsman123
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Re: Tips on using real coal required please

Postby flying scotsman123 » Sun Feb 12, 2017 5:47 pm

To glue it down I've used neat PVA in the tender, put the coal in then a watered down PVA with fairy liquid on top, as with ballasting.

Don't worry about dust, put it all in! There was a discussion about coal quality back in real days on another forum and the consensus was it was much worse than the stuff that reaches tenders of preserved locomotives today, with descriptions of a few lumps about 2 foot in size in vast quantities of dust, and little in between. I shall try and find it and return if I do....
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Bigmet
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Re: Tips on using real coal required please

Postby Bigmet » Sun Feb 12, 2017 5:54 pm

Dust levels vary enormously with coal type: hardest bituminous coal very little, soft coal an awful lot. If you can find a harder coal use it, because soft coal just sheds dust all the time. If that's not possible, gently sieve it. Regular PVA or 'white glue' works very well to secure coal. Check before use that the version you have dries clear so it 'disappears' when gone off.

My favourite trick for use in wagons and bunkers, line the space the coal is to go into with cling film well overhanging the outside faces of the space. Let it go off fully, I often allow a whole week in a warm place. Then the coal load can be lifted out, the clingfilm removed and is thereafter a removeable load.

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flying scotsman123
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Re: Tips on using real coal required please

Postby flying scotsman123 » Sun Feb 12, 2017 5:58 pm

https://www.national-preservation.com/threads/where-does-the-best-and-worst-coal-come-from.845303/page-4

The main discussion here is about coal quality, but a few posts on size on pgs 4 and 5. Hope it's helpful.
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carnehan
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Re: Tips on using real coal required please

Postby carnehan » Sun Feb 12, 2017 6:38 pm

I can't add anything further other than to say watered down PVA works a treat for me. If I'm making permanent loads in wagons, such as the Airfix mineral wagons, I use the moulded load included in the kit to reduce the depth needed for actual coal and therefore reducing drying time too.

Paul

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Re: Tips on using real coal required please

Postby Ex-Pat » Sun Feb 12, 2017 11:31 pm

Thank you gentlemen all.

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End2end
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Re: Tips on using real coal required please

Postby End2end » Mon Feb 13, 2017 12:06 am

Bigmet wrote:My favourite trick for use in wagons and bunkers, line the space the coal is to go into with cling film well overhanging the outside faces of the space. Let it go off fully, I often allow a whole week in a warm place. Then the coal load can be lifted out


I actually sink a piece of balsa wood (around 5mm thick-ish) into the cling film lined wagon, paint neat pva on the balsa top and sprinkle the load scatter on top to the amount I want.
I then use a 50/50 pva/water mix with a couple of drops of washing up liquid to break the surface tension of the mix and pipette this over the load.
Once dry this gives a thick and strong load without having to use a lot of scatter and can also be used in wagons of the same size.
I sometimes add some flat card feet to the underside of the balsa to get upto any extra need height.
I also add a piece of lead flashing under the load the size of the inside of the wagon to weigh the wagon down.

Word of warning!!!....As Bigmet says you must leave them long enough to dry. I mistakingly put my wet loaded wagons into the airing cupboard to dry for 3 days. Thinking they had dried I turned one upside down and the wet mix came pouring out and all over the wagons sides creating a complete mess. I hade to completely clean the wagon and start from scratch. :evil:
Lesson learnt the hard way! :lol:

One thing pointed out to me was to have a look at how coal etc is loaded into wagons to see the heaps the loading mechanisms would make.
Thanks
End2end
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Re: Tips on using real coal required please

Postby Ex-Pat » Mon Feb 13, 2017 10:14 pm

Thanks E2e.


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