Painting your own back scenes

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tornado64
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Re: Painting your own back scenes

Postby tornado64 » Wed Apr 03, 2013 10:01 am

first off we start by priming whatever surface you decide to use , i've used ply boards but equaly you could use hardboard or artists canvas priming is done by using gesso !!

here is a pretty good deal i found
http://www.artifolk.co.uk/catalog/products/acrylic_mediums_and_primers/daler_rowney_artists_white_or_black_gesso_primer.htm
but equaly it can be found localy in good art shops i got mine from "the works "

gesso has 3 functions 1 it seals the surface to be painted on , 2 it gives a bonding key for paint application , 3 it can be used to give desired texture of the painting surface

i have given my boarding 2 coats in the form of one coat applied in horizontal brush strokes , leave 24 hours to dry then sand to remove some roughness and blemmishes then one coat applied in vertical brush strokes leave to dry for 24 hours then sand to remove roughness and blemmishes

sanding depends on personal prefrence you can sand so surface is as smoothe as the proverbial babys bum but this isn't necessarily a good thing as if you are not an experienced painter a smooth surface will prove difficult to paint on this is the reason artist canvas has the weave remaining

you can of course use gesso to make your canvas smoother if that is what you desire but unless experienced in painting it is best to only do a couple of coats and leave most of the canvas weave

you can of course buy ready primed artist canvas but often it is poor quality and only applied minimaly the way to tell if artists canvas is already primed is by colour if the canvas is a beigey or creamy colour odds on it will not be primed if it is white it will be primed

if you decide to go down the route of using canvas and if ready primed and you are happy with the surface texture it is perfectly ok to start straight off but if boards are decided on priming is an unavoidable step and one worth getting right

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Pete
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Re: Painting your own back scenes

Postby Pete » Wed Apr 03, 2013 11:39 am

Hi

Have you tried painting onto MDF? any views?, would you Gesso it to provide a tooth as it's pretty smoothe?

The best quality carved rocking horses were traditionally coated with gesso prior to painting.

(By chance I have some Acrylic Gesso, bought it in one of those, 'I wonder what I can do with this...' moments.)



Pete
It's the nature of evolution
The dinosaurs went to Hell

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tornado64
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Re: Painting your own back scenes

Postby tornado64 » Wed Apr 03, 2013 11:53 am

personaly i'd avoid mdf and go for ply , basicly because i have seen mdf behave in strange ways to damp and heat in that it swells in areas , having said that i should think if you used gesso on all surfaces to seal it well it would probably prevent that problem especialy if not using in extreeme conditions as is our case !!

yes gesso will provide a better texture especialt when painting individual coats alternating between verticle and horizontal brush strokes
Last edited by tornado64 on Wed Apr 03, 2013 12:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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tornado64
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Re: Painting your own back scenes

Postby tornado64 » Wed Apr 03, 2013 12:12 pm

first off i'll be painting a basic daytime sky that is usualy what we opt for for our models usualy depicting a nice summer day with some clouds ( but equaly at home any time of day )

first thing to do is to lay down the basic bacground of the sky ( ignoring clouds for the time being ) the sky will be laid down as a graduation of colours to obtain a lifelike blue sky ( wich is anything but one colour of blue )

colours required are

Image

a basic paint set such as windsor and newton "winton " oils is more than useable and i will attempt to guide on mixing any non included colours but i'd go for ready mixed tubes for convenience

also you may wish to use acrylics and i can guide in that ( feel free to ask ) as i also paint in acrylics but go with the presumption colours will be much the same but will go under difrent names the important thing is to observe that you use a very simmilar colour and also bear in mind you have to work faster in acrylics

partly because i'll be working slow in oils

my selected colours are left to right

purple madder alizarin ( this is a very pigmented artist quality paint and is about £15 quid a tube ) any dark purple will do and will be lots cheeper i am just in the process of upgrading to more reliable artist quality pigments

french ultramarine

cobalt blue

cerulean blue

veridian

titanium white

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tornado64
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Re: Painting your own back scenes

Postby tornado64 » Wed Apr 03, 2013 12:33 pm

having mentioned i am painting in oils , and i also mentioned "artist quality " paints it is worth mentioning grades of paints at this time


artist quality ... better more expensive colour pigments in top quality carriers made to very precise consistency , drawback is expense

student quality ... most good makes have a student quality range , student quality is what you buy in sets of paints by good quality known suppliers such as daler rowney etc

all other bargain basement makes are best avoided but if a budget is a limmiting factor give them a go some can be surprisingly good for the money

a thing to observe is when buying seperate tubes is that both student quality and artist quality are sold pretty close to each other and it is easy to mistakedly buy artist quality instead of student quality resulting in a bad shock at the till !!

both acrylic and oils have thier artist / student ranges from quality suppliers

last to mention are "open " acrylics these can give more working time " up to 24 hrs " but as i'm finding out sporadic supply and unusual colour pallates can be off putting for begginers

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tornado64
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Re: Painting your own back scenes

Postby tornado64 » Wed Apr 03, 2013 1:17 pm

Pete wrote:Hi

Have you tried painting onto MDF? any views?, would you Gesso it to provide a tooth as it's pretty smoothe?

no but see my personal views above

The best quality carved rocking horses were traditionally coated with gesso prior to painting.

there's gesso and there's gesso !! the old stle gessos were a chalk based medium ( i have yet to try them ) but they are highly rated for certain jobs

(By chance I have some Acrylic Gesso, bought it in one of those, 'I wonder what I can do with this...' moments.)

same as i have used so ideal



Pete

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tornado64
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Re: Painting your own back scenes

Postby tornado64 » Fri Apr 05, 2013 6:05 pm

first off is the type of sky i'll be painting as it seems to be the most favoured!!

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it is actualy reasonably easy to get to grips with and do reasonably well as long as colour observation is taken on and certain lighting observations are observed

clouds will come after the basic sky is painted as i work on a layers type of principle .........wich leads me to !!

fat over lean this is an oil painting term ( not important if you decide to use acrylics ) oil paints dry by means of oxidisation , so your first layers will be painted using turpentine as a medium ( I.E. paint mixing fluid or thinners ) coats afterwards use linseed oil , poppy oil etc etc so the oils have uniform drying times , because oils (even when painted thinly) take around 6 months to fully harden

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tornado64
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Re: Painting your own back scenes

Postby tornado64 » Wed Apr 10, 2013 11:03 am

for the first stage only two brushes are required

1 a normal 1.5 or 2 inch decorators brush ( find the softest bristle possible ) if feeling realy posh art shops sell exceptionaly soft ones wich are what is especialy good for this task but look to pay 20 quid upwards ( your choice but that's why i persevere with decorators brushes

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2 a soft bristle fan brush ( for fine blending of paints ) an exceptionaly useful brush for many fine on canvas paint blending techniques

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on top of these you will require a bottle of turps , (water for acrylics ) and a rag

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tornado64
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Re: Painting your own back scenes

Postby tornado64 » Sun Apr 14, 2013 3:09 pm

without further a do onwards with some painting

firstly i coated the sky area in a titanium white thined down with turpentine ( water if your working in acrylics ) then the first layer of colour was painted at the top ( french ultramarine )

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next a band of cerulean blue or cobalt blue is painted below the french ultramarine avoid edges being too straight

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next to give vibrancy to the mid sky ( cobalt blue ) i mix in a very small amount of (veridian green )

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finaly is the most tricky part of blending them together , in my blending i have not blended perfectly smoothly this is because there will be cloud cover and also because i'm working fast on a day off as i have other jobs to do , you may of course wish to have smoother blending for a cloudless sky in wich case spend a little more time with a softer brush

there are various techniques i use for blended skys although the biggest amount is horizontal strokes with the odd downwards vertical stroke to bring colours down ( the brush must be cleaned inbetween each downward vertical stroke to stop lighter colours transfering up !! )

light scumbling techniques are also used to help blend colours ( followed by horizontal strokes to blend )

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scumbling !! http://youtu.be/xJ2g5AhFmq0

it is now time to allow the first part to dry before further work commences where i will cover clouds as seen they can be done using the scumbling technique but that loses your graduated backing sky giving a very flat look i wait and paint my clouds as another layer as it gives a far better representation

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tornado64
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Re: Painting your own back scenes

Postby tornado64 » Sun Jan 12, 2014 12:37 pm

quite a break from this through one thing or another

the boards are now built into a small diorama i'll be using for photo purposes

at the point i'll be deciding on lay of the land , items to be painted in the landscape , disguising items like trees for hiding back scene join etc etc

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Pete
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Re: Painting your own back scenes

Postby Pete » Sun Jan 12, 2014 12:42 pm

Hi Tornado

Could I ask how you blended the grass between the ballast and the green, it's a nice effect.

Thanks

Pete
It's the nature of evolution
The dinosaurs went to Hell

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tornado64
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Re: Painting your own back scenes

Postby tornado64 » Sun Jan 12, 2014 3:00 pm

sure pete !! think of scatters and static grasses as you do painting to get subtle results you have to blend colours and textures into each other !! I used an earthy chocolate coloured scatter to represent a worn drainage area between ballast and grass blended into the ballast on one side and grass on the other observing photos of a similar location in the season you are representing helps too

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tornado64
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Re: Painting your own back scenes

Postby tornado64 » Sun Jan 12, 2014 3:23 pm

only doing very basic as at times it will be blurred anyway by photo techniques

after painting in some hills to blend in to the static grass I will use ( to build depth and form it is worth mentioning that grass gets paler the further away it gets ! ) I make a start on the trees , I paint trees in 3 layers first I stipple the rough shape of the foliage randomly in a dark green such as terre vert or sap green straight from the tube leaving areas of the sky showing through as though a bird could fly through
next I paint the trunk in raw umber mixed with a little white using more white on the side the daylight falls on at the same time paint a few representations of branches reaching out in the foliage it is important not to overdo it if not more than used to painting to avoid looking over done ( work on the theory less is more )
lastly build up the outside foliage using the same green but much lightened with yellow and or white stipple on again making random foliage patterns ( not forgetting to still leave visible sky showing and the darker background colour also remember every tree has highlights so mix a very pale whitey green for highlights where the light hits the top areas of the foliage

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