Dragonfly's Workbench

What are you up to on your workbench
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Dragonfly
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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby Dragonfly » Wed Dec 21, 2016 2:25 pm

So, the N-gauge shunting layout now has a name and a thread: Much Oakley

Bufferstop wrote:I started looking at the possibilities for easily converting existing types to twin power systems when I read the makeup of the Spanish train that was involved in that disastrous crash. It was a high speed electric train (loco each end) on the TALGO system. The loco part had been split off from the train and a specially built cabless diesel loco inserted between the original electric and the rest of the train, and configured to be driven by the controls in the original locos. I couldn't find out if it had it's own traction motors or supplied the ones in the original loco.


Hmm, that has got me thinking, for sure. For the 3rd Generation version then, a cab-ended Mk4 as above, but at the other, a standard Cl91 with the flat-cab end replaced with a corridor connection, and a diesel generator trailer between that and the coaches... A very nice idea! Will certainly have to think about that.

Mountain wrote:Regarding boxes for ones trains. Apart from their protective qualities I've been puzzled why boxed items sell more secondhand, as a boxed item can hide a damaged item. While we all expect slightly more for a boxed example, this is only due to the expectations of the model railway industry in the RTR field.
Scratch built or kit built items often don't have a box or if a kit built item has a box rarely will if fit the kit once built, so one does not expect such an item to be boxed. Therefore the value remains the same boxed or not.
In practical use, it is true that boxes get in the way when one has to get stock out or put stock away on ones layout.
However for storage use if one has a house move etc, they are protection against damage.
Do I buy a boxed example and pay more or unboxed? To be honest, I prefer unboxed to save myself some money! If both are the same price, a boxed one if I get the chance to open the box to check it over, but only because the resale market is higher for a boxed example.


Totally agree, really. Unless you're planning on selling it on, there's no real gain to keeping the boxes. I'm keeping the boxes I have, for sure, but they're in storage up in the loft, out of the way, as the bubble-wrap is plenty for my needs.

alex3410 wrote:I have been working on one in php for years :oops: :lol:

I first did php in uni and fell in love with it, I got on with it so much better then any of the other languages we tried. I now get to use it daily as a web developer and having this personal project to work on has taught me more then anything else. The reason why it's taking so long is every time I find a new better way of doing things I tend to end up starting it all again from scratch :lol: or we get busy at work and I don't touch it for months

Either way the value of a project you enjoy working on form an educational viewpoint is invaluable. I am happy with the invested time because of what I have learnt from it - even if I never finish it :lol:


I'm certainly enjoying playing with PHP, for sure. It's something I tinkered with about ten years ago, modifying phpbb forums, but that was all. It's only recently, now I've finally gotten around to going to uni (only 10.5 years late), I'm taking the opportunity to learn it properly. Part of my job is that of system developer (out of necessity, rather than my job description), so having a web-based option to the work system makes it much more sale-able.
=Doug
| Dragonfly | Current projects: Kidneston (00) / Clatter (N) / Much Oakley (N) / Workbench |

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Dragonfly
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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby Dragonfly » Sat Dec 24, 2016 10:04 am

One last test, of course, before heading West for Christmas, is of course to check that the boxes actually fit in the bookcase. I had tested with the individual boards, but knowing my luck...

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...oh! It actually worked! A tight fit, but that's perfect, no unwanted movement that way.
=Doug
| Dragonfly | Current projects: Kidneston (00) / Clatter (N) / Much Oakley (N) / Workbench |

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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby Dragonfly » Sun Jul 23, 2017 2:36 pm

Latest new project: A pair of display units to go on top of the bookcases.

Wood bought pre-cut to size from smartbabel.com.

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Zigzag supports made by just gluing the longer pieces together at right angles.

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All made just using glue. Next time I'll probably use screws too, and have it open-able so a little bit of storage space is available.

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Shelves all glued in place. Left like this for a couple of days to set.

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All painted. Woodland Scenics "Earth Undercoat" on the horizontals, plain gloss white on the verticals. Yes, there's some white on the brown bits, but the plan is to ballast the track, so it's no big deal.

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While one is awaiting being ballasted, I've set up the other in place. Not bad work, if I say so myself...
=Doug
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Dragonfly
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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby Dragonfly » Mon Apr 22, 2019 6:04 pm

After a weekend spent mainly in the garage working on baseboards, I still don't have much to show on here.

But one little project I've begun is building up a 7mm narrow gauge fleet. I have a couple of locos and coach kits, but first off is putting some wagons together. These are all 3D printed kits available very very cheaply on eBay (link). While not 100% perfect, they are certainly very nice and any imperfections are easily filled. Thankfully I have a good source of cheap wheels; couplings are proving a bit tricky to source cheaply, though!

So far I have the first sixteen to get on with, with a further eighteen on order, and at least ten more planned. I don't actually have a layout for them to run on yet, it being the next project in line after Kidneston, but there is an 0-16.5 layout at the club that I'll operate it on in the meantime.

First step with these has been to paint the underframes in black, and the bodies in primer. Some will remain grey, the others painted in other colours, before the body frames are painted black and lettering applied.

IMG_20190422_155703a.jpg

IMG_20190422_143433a.jpg
=Doug
| Dragonfly | Current projects: Kidneston (00) / Clatter (N) / Much Oakley (N) / Workbench |

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PinkNosedPenguin
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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby PinkNosedPenguin » Mon Apr 22, 2019 6:27 pm

Hmmm, an interesting source of, as you say very cheap, O-16.5 wagons :D. A very economical way to build up a sizeable collection.
I'll be interested to see how these turn out, and maybe purchase some myself . . .

BTW, as I use tension lock couplers, I purchased some of these which come with little 'pockets' that can easily be mounted at the appropriate height on any vehicle: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/323484232330?ViewItem=&item=323484232330

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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby Mountain » Mon Apr 22, 2019 8:36 pm

Dragonfly wrote:After a weekend spent mainly in the garage working on baseboards, I still don't have much to show on here.

But one little project I've begun is building up a 7mm narrow gauge fleet. I have a couple of locos and coach kits, but first off is putting some wagons together. These are all 3D printed kits available very very cheaply on eBay (link). While not 100% perfect, they are certainly very nice and any imperfections are easily filled. Thankfully I have a good source of cheap wheels; couplings are proving a bit tricky to source cheaply, though!

So far I have the first sixteen to get on with, with a further eighteen on order, and at least ten more planned. I don't actually have a layout for them to run on yet, it being the next project in line after Kidneston, but there is an 0-16.5 layout at the club that I'll operate it on in the meantime.

First step with these has been to paint the underframes in black, and the bodies in primer. Some will remain grey, the others painted in other colours, before the body frames are painted black and lettering applied.

IMG_20190422_155703a.jpg
IMG_20190422_143433a.jpg


Regarding couplings, why not make your own? They are relatively easy to make. Drawing pins and paperclips.

Those wagons and vans will be ace!
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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby Dragonfly » Tue Apr 23, 2019 7:17 am

Wow. I'd considered making my own, but hadn't considered that particular arrangement (or drawing pins at all). I might have to have a play with that idea myself, thanks!
=Doug
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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby Mountain » Tue Apr 23, 2019 8:44 am

Some examples.

The coupling height was worked out (You don't need any great accuracy as you can be a mm out, prehaps two) so the lowestpart of the buffer will rest against the frame of my lowest waggon. The lowest waggon, a skip type waggon has little squashed wire loops sticking up and soldered to the frame to act like pins to accept a drop bar from an ajoining vehicle.
The loco shows the drop bar in the normal uncoupled position and thenthe raised position. The raised position is just balanced there and I can rough shunt and crash into another vehicles bufder where the drop bar falls and couples. Yes, you can hear buffers clashing!
General uncoupling or coupling is done by hand with a piece of wire and is much, much easier then trying to couple 0 gauge 3 link vehicles, as the drop loops are easy to flick over. So it feels prototypcal in use and does have the ability to lift a bar off stage and run the loco into a waggon on stage to couple with the above method if desired.
Other noticeable advantages. Vehicles can be pushed without being coupled. While coupled they can turn using very sharp curves if desired (A design criteria of mine as my curves turn 180° on a 2ft wide board), and they also offer noticeably close coupling. Coaches can couple with just a few mm gap if desired. Even witn my sharp curves they couple at least half the gap of tension locks which is still closer then kadees.
They are also easier to fit onto vehicles. Just three holes into the bufferbeam at each end. Occasionally one may need to deepen a buffer beam but it is relatively easy to do with plasticard or wood etc.
Oh. While I remember to say. The hinges used for the drop bar are the cheaply purchased little wire clothes fastners which ave been opened out and cut in half.. Ordinary bendy wire will do. I just find these fasteners ideal. A sewing or knitting shop may have these.
The buffers collar is cosmetic only and is made from cutting pieces off a plastic spray cans straw. GT85 straws I use mostly though WD40 also do sprays wit similar straws. They are an ideal size to slide over the shaft of the drawing pin.
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Bufferstop
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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby Bufferstop » Tue Apr 23, 2019 10:07 am

I like the method of balancing the coupling bar vertically, then allowing the buffing shock to drop it into the coupled position, it appeals to my ideas on how a narrow gauge railway should be operated.
Growing old, can't avoid it. Growing up, forget it!
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Mountain
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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby Mountain » Tue Apr 23, 2019 1:43 pm

That came after two and a half years of daydreaming... :lol:

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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby Dragonfly » Wed May 01, 2019 7:11 pm

I have found a very cheap source of tension locks, at last (Replica Railways do packs of 10 for £3.50), so that option is now back on the table of possibilities. I'd have to make NEM pockets though (or glue the couplings in place), so will have to have a tinker at making some, while waiting for Replica to have them in stock. I still have to experiment with the drawing pin method too though.

In the meantime though, some painting has occured.

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A bit bright, I grant you, but as you can see from the box vans, they tone down a lot when dry, and they will all be darkened when weathered down. The range in total won't be this colourful, I just wanted a couple of each colour to start off with to see what works and what doesn't.

Paint supplied by Graff-City - "Dope Supreme" and "Clash" ranges have worked very well, due to the two-stage nozzles allowing a nice "slow" spray. Next step is to paint the metalwork black then start on the lettering.
=Doug
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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby Mountain » Wed May 01, 2019 8:55 pm

Interesting that you are using different colours.

Regarding the tension lock couplings... When I see something cheap I often think that such items may suddenly have their prices updated after one has ordered?

The drawing pin type couplings... The loops made from paperclips can be formed using a home made jig which is basically four round nails hammered into wood at the right spacings that have had their heads removed. You can do this with several spaceings for different sized loops. Make one or two freehand (I use small ling nosed pliers) at first to get the idea.

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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby PinkNosedPenguin » Thu May 02, 2019 7:14 pm

Dragonfly wrote:I have found a very cheap source of tension locks, at last (Replica Railways do packs of 10 for £3.50), so that option is now back on the table of possibilities. I'd have to make NEM pockets though (or glue the couplings in place), so will have to have a tinker at making some, while waiting for Replica to have them in stock.


If Peter Spares ones come back in stock (see link in my previous post) then they are only £4.40 for a pack of 10 INCLUDING (a kind of) NEM pockets :D - or maybe they are available elsewhere . . . ?

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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby Mountain » Thu May 02, 2019 7:37 pm

I have a spare packet or two of Bachmann small tension lock couplings... At least one packet.

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Re: Dragonfly's Workbench

Postby Dragonfly » Mon May 06, 2019 11:11 am

Mountain wrote:I have a spare packet or two of Bachmann small tension lock couplings... At least one packet.


Much appreciated, however I seem to be jumping into this with both feet, with currently 34 wagons, and a planned further 38. So I'm looking at somewhat more industrial quantities. :lol:

PinkNosedPenguin wrote:If Peter Spares ones come back in stock (see link in my previous post) then they are only £4.40 for a pack of 10 INCLUDING (a kind of) NEM pockets :D - or maybe they are available elsewhere . . . ?


Absolutely, and if that shows itself as the easier option, that's what I'll do.

Alternatively though, I've found that most of this range of wagons has a standardised height and pair of holes in the frame. I've found that I can draw up a small piece in TinkerCad that fits on to these and serves as an NEM pocket. Like this, in fact:

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And I can get nearly 200 of these (I'm only planning 72 wagons, so only need 144, but may as well have spares) printed commercially for less than £20 total, so I may follow this route. First, though, is to get the height and adjust the piece's CAD to fit.

But in the meantime, another parcel arrived from eBay, with 18 more wagons, and a few bare frames I'll be turning into tankers. So they went straight into the production line, frames painted black and bodies primed.

IMG_20190506_092333a.jpg


I'm awaiting a delivery of paints, including a darker grey for those wagons remaining in grey (almost all of this new batch, and the majority overall).
On the subject of paints, though, where am I getting them? Well, I'm not too handy with brushes, particularly on overall colours. And I don't have an airbrush at this time, also finding them rather fiddly until I'm proficient enough, so I'm sticking to spray paints. But they're quite high pressure, the ones they sell at Wilko, often pinging the model halfway across the garage. And they don't have a wide enough range of colours. So I set about searching t'Interwebs, and found Graff-City, who aim for the graffiti "artist"'s market. Particularly their Clash or Dope Surpeme ranges. Cheap, postage is as low as a flat £4.50, so one can get five cans for about £20 total, making them cheaper than WIlko's cheapest.
But the main advantage is the plungers. As mentioned before, most spray paints have two modes. Off, or high pressure on. These graffitiers' cans, however, have two-stage plungers, so you can get a nice easy low-pressure spray, not quite as precise as an airbrush but good enough for base coat purposes.
=Doug
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