NRM Article - Tunnels

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Danny
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NRM Article - Tunnels

Postby Danny » Mon Mar 26, 2007 7:22 pm

Okay, this is my first crack at an artical for the main site.

I have chosen to do tunnels - to add to what is already there.


Artical start.
-------------------------------

Tunnels

Introduction

Trains cannot usually go up steep gradients, this meant that when the navies were building the railways they either had to go around hills following the contours or they had to dig cuttings so the railway would stay relatively flat as it went over high ground. When the ground became to steep or high for a cutting to be dug successfully tunnels were built.

On model railways tunnels are often used to hide things which may make a layout look unrealistic. You will have probably noticed that allot of layouts have tunnels to hide steep curves in the track which are unrealistic. Tunnels are often used as a divide between the layout and the fiddle yard.

Things to Consider

> In real life tunnels were/are expensive to build so often a cutting is carried on as long as possible before a tunnel is build.
> The old steam trains used to give off allot of steam and smoke so ventilation shafts were sometimes built in the tunnels to take the smoke out into the air, also for the same reasons tunnels were quite high compared to the trains going through them, again to let the smoke out into the air.

Tunnel Mouths

Where a railway (or road for that matter) enters a tunnel there is a structure holding back the soil and rock, this is the tunnel mouth.

If you want a tunnel on your model railway it is a good idea to first decide how you are going to obtain a tunnel mouth. You could decide to build one from scratch, build a kit or buy a ready to use one.

If you are going down the route of making your own from scratch here is a template sheet which you can download, print off and cut out for use for a double track tunnel mouth in either OO or N gauge. Find it here (Adobe PDF - 6Kb).

For the kit way of doing it there is scalescenes and metcalfe to name just a couple of brands which you can buy a kit of some tunnel mouths.

Ready to use tunnel mouths are available from peco and hornby, again to name a couple.

Real Examples

ImageImage Image
From railwaypictures.co.uk

OO Gauge Example

<incert existing artical on creating a tunnel>

N Gauge Example

On my layout I have decided to use a tunnel to disguise the steep corners and disguise that my layouts track is in a loop.

For my tunnel portholes I have gone down the route of buying some ready made, which I can place on my layout ready and later paint to add realism. The particular tunnels I have used are peco double track N gauge ones.

Image

Usually on a layout you can see about the first four inches into a tunnel so for this reason I chose to make the first 5 inches of the tunnel with a tube. I quickly realised that a toilet tube cut down it's length with around 7mm cut off was the perfect size to fit onto the tunnel mouth - and as a bonus it was already curved.

Image

After reading a comment on the forum about making tunnels dark came my next idea, to make some brick paper faded to black. You can download this here (JPG Image - 47Kb). I trimmed the brick paper down to size and stuck it to the inside of the tunnel with a glue stick. I glued the toilet roll with brick paper onto my tunnel mouth using super glue.

The next step was to place it on my layout, I carefully placed it and tested it with some carriages to make sure that none would scrape on the side of the tunnels inside. All was okay so I proceeded and stuck it down with a hot glue gun, but I guess almost any glue would do.

Image

The tunnel is now ready for some hard landscaping - which is covered on this site here - I look forward to doing this at a later date.

----------------------------------------------
Artical End.

Feel free to change parts of it if you decide to use it :).

Danny.
Last edited by Danny on Thu Mar 29, 2007 5:35 pm, edited 2 times in total.

mumbles
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Postby mumbles » Mon Mar 26, 2007 7:28 pm

nice one danny
i'll guess that little pic will have to do for an update on your layout :lol:
seriously though, good article, makes me think there's a carpet shop down the road from me that always has the inner cardboard tubes outside ready for the bin, like giant toilet roll tubes!
might have to investigate [although they are probably too thick]
michael

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PTmodeller
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Postby PTmodeller » Mon Mar 26, 2007 7:40 pm

Is the midde picture Blea Moor on the Settle Carlisle?

Danny
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Postby Danny » Mon Mar 26, 2007 7:48 pm

Yeh, I took them off railwaypictures.co.uk 'cause the viaducts artical has some examples off there too.

Cheers Michael.

Danny.

m8internet
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Re: Artical: Tunnels

Postby m8internet » Mon Mar 26, 2007 8:02 pm

Metheringham wrote:Image

Just me, or is that a OO gauge tunnel with N gauge track and Class 158?
Glasgow Queen Street Model Railway layout : modern image N gauge using DCC

Danny
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Postby Danny » Mon Mar 26, 2007 8:14 pm

It's an N gauge tunnel, the peco one, but now you say that it does look large. I think it is like that to allow the use of overhead wires. It migtht've looked a little smaller if I had chosen to put cork under the rails. As for the N gauge track and 158, yes you're right :).

Danny.

m8internet
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Postby m8internet » Mon Mar 26, 2007 8:23 pm

That isn't an N gauge tunnel
I've got one and the bricks are WAY TOO LARGE!
The clearance at the top of a 158 is about 30mm at the most
From that photo you could fit another 158 on top!
Glasgow Queen Street Model Railway layout : modern image N gauge using DCC

Danny
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Postby Danny » Mon Mar 26, 2007 8:39 pm

Image

It's N gauge, the OO gauge loco doesn't fit!

Danny.

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suchahampal
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Postby suchahampal » Mon Mar 26, 2007 8:40 pm

Great article. 8)

How come you've got 00 items? I thought you just did 'n' gauge!

dr5euss
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Postby dr5euss » Mon Mar 26, 2007 9:05 pm

Aww that last pic shows how cute N is :)

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Infrontcat
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Postby Infrontcat » Tue Mar 27, 2007 2:12 am

Good stuff Danny! :wink:

As for the 125, if it ever needs a new home in the future, gimme a shout...though make sure its later than sooner as I'm utterly brassic for now, lol!

Tunnel mouth looks excellent and your explaination is nice and clear and idiot proof (hell, if I can understand it... :roll: )

Good work matey

Tim
"Kashi-mashi, kashi-mashi..."

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gppsoftware
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Postby gppsoftware » Fri Jun 08, 2007 3:54 am

Here's another way to build tunnel mouths:

http://mrol.gppsoftware.com/tunnelmouth.aspx

Graham Plowman

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pete12345
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Postby pete12345 » Fri Jun 08, 2007 9:05 am

Looks great! How long does scribing the stonework take?
Once an engine attached to a train, was afraid of a few drops of rain...

gppsoftware
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Postby gppsoftware » Sat Jun 09, 2007 4:54 am

pete12345 wrote:Looks great! How long does scribing the stonework take?


A couple of evenings - it's one of those things that once you get into it and discover a technique, you can do it fairly quickly.
A third evening is necessary to do the tidying up work (filling in corners, re-scribing thereof etc).
The scribing is done with a mini counter-sink in a dremel with the 1m flexible extension shaft. Provided the plaster is not too hard (care needs to be taken in the mix and I find mixing wallpaper paste in helps), the scribing is generally quite quick, however, it is a very dusty process, best done in a well ventilated area and definately using a face mask to prevent inhalation.

My first attempt at this method of construction was:

http://mrol.gppsoftware.com/viaduct.aspx

This took about a month from start to finish - too long!

Graham Plowman

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Metrocamel
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Postby Metrocamel » Fri Jun 22, 2007 7:04 pm

Nice article. Like the interior of the tunnel mouth too.
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