Victorian era layout

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4MT
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Re: Victorian era layout

Postby 4MT » Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:17 pm

Thanks for all the advice and comments, chaps....very much appreciated as always.

I've decided to put the Victorian layout on the back burner for the time being until I have more information, more experience, and most importantly, more room. That way I'll feel more confident of doing it justice, not just slinging it all together and making a **** of things.

Thank you agan...
.

Richard

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"my train of thought seems to be running late..."

b308
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Re: Victorian era layout

Postby b308 » Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:26 pm

The trouble with the Victorian era, other than lack of suitable RTR stock is that it was made up of many large and small companies, even the aforementioned GWR wasn't the largest company around as far as I was aware as it didn't have lines like the Cambrian, etc., included until after 1923, in those days the biggie would have been the LNWR closely followed by the Midland. It needs a lot of research, there are lots of books around, just keep your eyes open!

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flying scotsman123
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Re: Victorian era layout

Postby flying scotsman123 » Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:34 pm

b308 wrote:The trouble with the Victorian era, other than lack of suitable RTR stock is that it was made up of many large and small companies, even the aforementioned GWR wasn't the largest company around as far as I was aware as it didn't have lines like the Cambrian, etc., included until after 1923, in those days the biggie would have been the LNWR closely followed by the Midland. It needs a lot of research, there are lots of books around, just keep your eyes open!


Apparently GWR route mileage was 3000 at grouping, compared to just over 2100 for the LNWR and MR each, but yes, trying to figure out the eclectic mix of rolling stock around at the time can be hard work - wagons especially could end up all over the place.
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b308
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Re: Victorian era layout

Postby b308 » Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:41 pm

I wasn't thinking of mileage, but turnover, by 1923 the LNWR had amalgamated with the LYR and had a track mileage of over 2600 but I think they were busier commercially than the GWR. It was the largest Joint Stock Company at the amalgamation into the Big Four, the LMSR followed suit in 1948!

"As the largest joint stock company in the United Kingdom, it collected a greater revenue than any other railway company of its era." - Wikki - ref to a book published in 1975
Last edited by b308 on Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:44 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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4MT
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Re: Victorian era layout

Postby 4MT » Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:43 pm

As I said, much more research will be needed to make a decent job of it. In the meantime, I'm going to crack on with my end to end version of the Cuckoo Line...my front door is about fifty yards from the the line used to run, so I have what you'd call a 'close affinity' with it.
.

Richard

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"my train of thought seems to be running late..."

NickH
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Re: Victorian era layout

Postby NickH » Fri Jan 26, 2018 7:17 pm

One gentleman who has created a number of Victorian layouts, based on LBSC practice, is Ian White, and his website http://early-lbscr.co.uk details three in particular, two of which were exhibited widely in the South East. His work, and others of similar leanings, can also be found in the various Modellers' Digests prepared by a member of of the Brighton Circle, which are available on line, via the Circle's website http://www.lbscr.org/Models/Journal/index.html. As a consequence of the paucity of RTR stock, and the lack of kits for really old loco classes, Ian has constructed many locos from scratch. Many modellers tend to extend their period into the Edwardian era, as that greatly expands the range of available kits.
In addition to the locos mentioned by others, the Brighton Terrier is probably the oldest RTR loco available, since the similarly aged Beattie well tanks were substantially rebuilt into the form available RTR. I think the Adams LSWR O2 and Radial tank both qualify as Victorian, as does Drummond's M7.
As far as people are concerned, be aware that Preiser models are in HO, so they are roughly 85% the size of home grown OO Victorians, although it makes things confusing that Victorians tended to be shorter, on average, than currently. A relatively recent newcomer into this field is Andrew Stadden https://www.acstadden.co.uk/ whose figures are now seen as some of the best on the market. He has created genuine Victorian characters, rather than the quasi-Victorian / Edwardian ones, and properly painted will enhance any layout. 5&9 Models, a possible source of proper Victorian rolling stock kits, also has a small range of figures sometimes available, which includes some real Victorian types.

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4MT
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Re: Victorian era layout

Postby 4MT » Fri Jan 26, 2018 7:31 pm

Nick, thank you so much for taking the time to come up with a reply like that, I really appreciate that. I now have plenty of information to go study....plenty of bedtime reading.

Thank you again..
.

Richard

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"my train of thought seems to be running late..."

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Mountain
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Re: Victorian era layout

Postby Mountain » Sat Jan 27, 2018 1:16 am

The golden age of steam power was said to be the 1880's and I can see why. Some of the most beautiful locomotives ever made were around in those days and we had the largest network of lines this country has ever seen. Line closures were nothing new. We talk about the Breeching cuts, though actually in the history of the railways in Britain the decade with the highest loss of railway milages out country has ever seen was in the early 1990's with the recession and the loss of many collieries. This decade of closures didnt hit passenger services so no one noticed, but even before the Victorian era came in many whole rail systems had already been and gone as industries came and went. The earliest pioneers of the industrial revolution had already faced competition with a large railway network now providing access to compete, and many could not compete.
I read fairly recently about the origions of the railways in South Wales. Why this area? Well, because back even a decade before Stephensons Rocket was built there were already some 80 or so estimated locomotives already built in the Great Britain, and over 60 of them were owned and used in Wales, South Wales being the main place to find the new beasts. Another thing to note about these early locomotives.. The first concerns about rail adhesion had nothing much to do with thoughts about steel running on steel..(As some historians have incorrectly quoted). They knew there were no issues on flatly layed lines. It was because many of the early lines had such steep gradients. While horses (The main motive power even in use in Wales in the early 1970's (One coal board surface railway in Wales were using horses up to 1973) could pull railway waggons up a 1in 4 gradient, mechanical steam locomotives couldn't. Most lines were less severe but still contained ups and downs as they were layed up and down every other hollow and over every hump more like some of our B roads do today. Hence in these early days steam locomotives took some time in most of the country to catch on!

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Emettman
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Re: Victorian era layout

Postby Emettman » Sat Jan 27, 2018 6:16 pm

One other possibility for locos of Victorian vintage are two or three of the Hornby international Electrotren (1:87 HO) 0-6-0's

Especially for industrial use, they are very nice models of the later Victorian era, and while they could be re-cabbed or otherwise adjusted, this may not be felt necessary. As pretty nice mechanisms they could always be hacked or re-bodied at a later date.

Chris
"It's his madness that keeps him sane."


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