LMS Super D question

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Bufferstop
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LMS Super D question

Postby Bufferstop » Sat May 19, 2018 11:25 am

A question I've never pursued,what was behind the box like extension in front of the cab alongside the firebox? One suggestion, in the days when they were all that could be seen at Bescot, was that without it there was nowhere big enough to apply the number!
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Mountain
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Re: LMS Super D question

Postby Mountain » Sat May 19, 2018 1:48 pm

For the drivers sandwiches? :lol: When were the boxes added? From new or under B.R. ownership? The B.R. numbers were longer so there may be some truth in that. It was interesting that GWR engines were the only ones to keep their origional numbers.
There could be a few reasons for the extensions. Could be a way of blowing smoke clear of the cab? Could be anything.
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Bigmet
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Re: LMS Super D question

Postby Bigmet » Sat May 19, 2018 2:30 pm

This was a characteristic construction of the cab in Crewe's designs, and from very early times before the thought of a spectacle plate - and then sides and a roof! - ever came along. I believe from consulting Mr CJ Bowen Cooke's 'British Locomotives 1894' that this was a casing over the injectors, which fed into the boiler just above the firebox crown. (The steam and water cocks would thereby easily be 'to hand in the cab.)There was a preference for keeping the working gubbins concealed, and Crewe was very much into established tradition.

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Bufferstop
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Re: LMS Super D question

Postby Bufferstop » Sat May 19, 2018 3:47 pm

That makes sense, the cab certainly lacked depth, other locos could fit similar numbers on the side sheet so anything mounted on the side of the firebox would have been within the cab. I've seen cabs with wedge shaped boxes in a similar position, to allow the longest fire irons to be pulled completely from the tender without fouling the front of the cab. I've also seen older open cab locos where the sidesheets extended forward of the spectacle plate (which didn't make it all the way to the sides). Like this one.
Furness_Railway_No_20.jpg

Although it's much less pronounced the reversing lever is pivoted from a point ahead of the spectacle plate.

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Mountain
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Re: LMS Super D question

Postby Mountain » Sat May 19, 2018 4:25 pm

Wouldn't that loco be an ideal candidate to use with the budget Hornby 0-4-0 chassis?
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Re: LMS Super D question

Postby UrbanHermit » Sat May 19, 2018 5:03 pm

All LNWR locomotives had cabs like that, even the most modern looking engines the LNWR ever built, the Claughtons. Before the days of cabs, that forward-extending waist-high sidesheet was a common feature on British locos. Other railways gradually dropped it; the LNWR didn't. It seems to have become an unshakable Crewe tradition. I've always presumed it was just stylistic.

The 'room for the number' theory doesn't hold water because the LNWR used cast numberplates very similar in size and shape to GWR ones.
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Bufferstop
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Re: LMS Super D question

Postby Bufferstop » Sat May 19, 2018 10:33 pm

Being big enough for the number was "anorak logic". It amazes me the number of spotters who hung around Bescot junction of an evening, in the 50s. Apart from the resident allocation of Super Ds and gronks the interesting stuff all came through mid day, it is in the middle of the country after all. There was one particular train that came in around 7:30pm, another ruddy Super D coming off the line from Wednesbury, squealing like a pig round an almost 180° curve with a string of empty 16t coa l wagons. Once that was in there wasn't much else to see, until they created the hump yards, but most of it was diesel by then.
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