Steam Locomotives. The Pioneering Years.

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b308
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Location: North Worcs

Re: Steam Locomotives. The Pioneering Years.

Postby b308 » Sun Jan 28, 2018 8:59 am

Yes they were, Mountain:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steam_whistle

(See "uses")

Sight Glasses were first used in 1829:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sight_glass

On early steam engines they'd have used the "fusible plug" to counter boiler explosions due to lack of water, invented by our old friend Trevithick, and surprisingly for those days widely publicised for free use by anyone!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fusible_plug

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Mountain
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Re: Steam Locomotives. The Pioneering Years.

Postby Mountain » Mon Jan 29, 2018 12:21 am

Thanks B308.
The early years look an ideal challenge for a scratchbuilding project or two. I already have enough to do with narrow gauge for now. Tempting though.
Enjoying 7mm narrow gauge.

Bigmet
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Re: Steam Locomotives. The Pioneering Years.

Postby Bigmet » Mon Jan 29, 2018 11:46 am

D605Eagle wrote:
Bigmet wrote:Highly recommended to get an idea of what the earliest working steam locomotives were like, Beamish open air museum. They had their working Locomotion no 1 replica operating the last time I went, and it demonstrated very nicely what some of the problems were for the crew. I'd love to see their 'steam elephant' replica going, but the engineer in charge of the operation told me they were at that time having 'difficulties' keeping it on the rails....

I saw it when it was quite new (It was the first new locomotive in the UK of the 21st century!!!!) The crew operating were really nice guys and were happy to chat about the engine. I hadn't heard about subsequent issues with it.

As I understood it, the trouble wasn't with the loco as such, but that the track had settled a little in places. These early locos didn't have suspension so little ability beyond frame flexing to take up any inequities in the track. The Locomotion replica had a good slip on one of the runs I saw as a result, and that took all the pressure, and they had to brew up for about five minutes to recover. The whole team were very friendly, and happy to talk to an enthusiast about the hows, whys and work-arounds that experience had taught them; although it should be kept in mind we were there on a very quiet day, so they were under no pressure to operate with long queues of passengers waiting for a ride...

Bigmet
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Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 2:19 pm

Re: Steam Locomotives. The Pioneering Years.

Postby Bigmet » Mon Jan 29, 2018 12:17 pm

Mountain wrote: The early years look an ideal challenge for a scratchbuilding project or two.

Back in a previous millenium at the end of my 'younger phase' of railway modelling (as major career responsibility and all the other truck of life 'kicked in'), one of the last railway events I went to was the 'Rail 150' celebration. A P4 model of the NEW! steam worked Stockton and Darlington of 1825 was shown. It had to be P4 as the wheels go outside the chaldron wagon frames so define the width of the wagon. The mechanisms were adapted from N gauge and it ran, pretty successfully too. It was a big layout, over 40 feet long, which gave it real impact.

Double century anniversary of the S&D in 2025. Better mechanism resources now for anyone thinking of another go at it...

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Bufferstop
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Re: Steam Locomotives. The Pioneering Years.

Postby Bufferstop » Mon Jan 29, 2018 6:10 pm

One of Stephenson's "improvements" that he adopted frequently gets ignored. The inclined cylinders he fitted to Rocket helped reduce the hammer blow effect on the rails and simplified the transmission of the piston stroke to the wheels. Without it he couldn't have got a small simple loco like Rocket up to 30mph. He obviously learned from the experience as Rocket was later modified to have its cylinders moved to an even more modern looking position.
Imagine something like Putting Billy with its pistons going up and down doing 30mph, it would never have stayed on the rails, not that there would be much left of them, rails fracturing was a significant problem.
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