EWS 25 Ton Queen Mary Brake Van??

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egroeg93
Posts: 484
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2009 12:39 am

EWS 25 Ton Queen Mary Brake Van??

Postby egroeg93 » Mon Feb 01, 2010 9:51 pm

Thats a mouthful.. but see it on ebay..

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/BACHMANN-33-830-2 ... 2002r31885

What sort of this is this wagon used for in realife??

RFS
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Location: Derbyshire, UK

Re: EWS 25 Ton Queen Mary Brake Van??

Postby RFS » Mon Feb 01, 2010 10:14 pm

Some historical details here. They were built by the Southern Railway so go back a long way. I have one on my layout, but it's very heavy and has a slight tendency to derail when on the end of a train of lighter wagons.

http://www.semgonline.com/vandw/brakevans04.html
Robert Smith

Northants PC
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Re: EWS 25 Ton Queen Mary Brake Van??

Postby Northants PC » Tue Feb 02, 2010 9:22 am

Up to as recently as 3-4yrs ago their was one at East Usk Yard (Newport, South Wales) EWS used it to propel steel wagons from the yard down to Orb steel works off the Uskmouth branch.

EWS still have a requirement for a few vans around the country main for propelling moves down long sidings or into terminal which dont have run round loops.

Northants PC.

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egroeg93
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Re: EWS 25 Ton Queen Mary Brake Van??

Postby egroeg93 » Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:29 pm

thanks for that link..

On the subject, can either of you/anyone tell me if my assumtion for the use of brake vans is correct?

I just thought you stick em on the back/front of trains and can help/bring them to a stop..

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stuartp
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Re: EWS 25 Ton Queen Mary Brake Van??

Postby stuartp » Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:57 pm

I just thought you stick em on the back/front of trains and can help/bring them to a stop..


Sort of. Goods trains not fitted with continuous automatic brakes (which was most of them before 1950) had to have a brake van at the back, in which the guard rode. His job was to apply a handbrake to assist the driver in stopping the train, and also to keep the couplings tight to prevent 'snatching' which led to broken couplings and runaways. Some wagons were fitted with vacuum brakes at this date, mostly fish, meat and milk vehicles intended to run in passenger trains and a limited number of vehicles for express goods services.

From about 1950 BR began a program of retro-fitting vacuum brakes (and better screw/instanter couplings) to goods wagons and by about 1960 unfitted wagons were in the minority, apart from coal which remained largely unfitted for a bit longer. Brake-fitted vehicles could be marshalled at the front of the train and braked by the driver. The last vehicle still had to be a brake van. From the early 60s air-braked vehicles began to appear, the two brake types ere not compatible with each other leading to 'dual-fitted' locos and stock.

In 1968 (I think) BR reached an agreement with the unions that on fully-fitted trains (i.e. those comprised entirely of air or vacuum brake fitted vehicles) the guard could ride in the back cab and the brake van was dispensed with. This coincided with the introduction of MGR coal trains, freightliners etc, all of which were air-braked. Unfitted and partly fitted trains became less common and were extinct by 1988 for revenue traffic, and a bit later for engineers' trains. By this time the only need for brake vans was for certain dangerous goods traffic (nuclear, HCN, certain gasses etc) where it was deemed sensible to have the guard at the back (where he didn't have to run past the potentially burning/leaking load to protect his train in the event of a mishap) or for movements which were required to reverse. On these the brake van meant the guard could have control of the brake which made propelling a lot less fraught for all concerned. The advent of NRN and other control measures meant that the dangerous goods requirement was eventually dropped (I think, can't think of any current ones) and the only remaining use is for propelling/reversing movements.

It was a bit more complicated than that but that's the jist of it.
Portwilliam - Southwest Scotland in the 1960s, in OO - http://stuart1968.wordpress.com/


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