Dead on shelf.

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Tiddles
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Joined: Sat Oct 09, 2010 6:17 pm

Dead on shelf.

Postby Tiddles » Thu Feb 15, 2018 12:47 pm

Has anyone come across this before :roll: :?:

Two locos with Hattons chips that have not been used for over an year. They have been kept boxed and safe on a shelf.

Went to run them to find out both are dead :o

Tried them on the programmed (cab side) number but nothing so tried them on address three, still nothing.

Put them on the programming track and gave them the cab side numbers as addresses. Back on to the layout and they run perfectly :lol:
The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, “Linking 13 Great States With The Nation.”

Paul-H
Posts: 244
Joined: Fri Jun 05, 2009 3:00 pm

Re: Dead on shelf.

Postby Paul-H » Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:43 pm

They obviously got the hump over being ignored for so long 8)

Bramshot
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Joined: Thu Jul 07, 2016 6:55 pm

Re: Dead on shelf.

Postby Bramshot » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:47 pm

Did you have to reset all the other CV’s, or did they remember those?

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Forfarian
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Location: Forfar, Angus

Re: Dead on shelf.

Postby Forfarian » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:59 pm

I have had this happen to a Class 37 sitting in a siding for 3 months, re programme the long number on the prog track and everything works ok. That was a Backy 21 pin decoder.
Tim
aka Forfarian

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Bufferstop
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Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2010 12:06 pm
Location: Bottom end of N. Warks line

Re: Dead on shelf.

Postby Bufferstop » Thu Feb 15, 2018 4:52 pm

Unexplained flash memory loss happens from time to time. No one has ever been able to tell me how or why. I've heard plenty of theories usually RF or electromagnetic fields, UV radiation, but then the cases that happen don't seem to be related to those causes. Just don't keep them on a shelf above the microwave. Be kinder to your stock take them out and give them a run occasionally :wink:
Growing old, can't avoid it. Growing up, forget it!
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matt1471
Posts: 333
Joined: Tue Dec 16, 2008 6:13 pm

Re: Dead on shelf.

Postby matt1471 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 5:36 pm

This is quite worrying.

My stock has been in storage for some 18months now due to personal matters.

Just in the process of rebuilding my layout to get my engines out to run them again.

I hope I don't suffer the same, especially with several of them being sound equipped!!

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Tiddles
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Re: Dead on shelf.

Postby Tiddles » Thu Feb 15, 2018 6:25 pm

Bramshot wrote:Did you have to reset all the other CV’s, or did they remember those?


I had not modified any CV's.

Other locos that had been waiting for a similar length of time work perfectly well, many of them sound fitted.
The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, “Linking 13 Great States With The Nation.”

RFS
Posts: 900
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2010 3:09 pm
Location: Derbyshire, UK

Re: Dead on shelf.

Postby RFS » Thu Feb 15, 2018 10:10 pm

Dave wrote:I have a BM Class 20 with a BM chip that looses its identity quite often.

It will just decide not to go. A quick reset of the address and away it goes, sometimes for days, sometimes for months.


And that's one of the reasons I gave up using Bachmann decoders - happened far too often. For example, I had a pair of Bachmann 2-EPBs in a consist and it was a right pain when one decoder reset but not the other. Now I have Lenz deocders everywhere and never had a problem with them.
Robert Smith

Tom@Crewe
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Location: Crewe

Re: Dead on shelf.

Postby Tom@Crewe » Sat Feb 17, 2018 7:29 am

Never enough time...........

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Bufferstop
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Re: Dead on shelf.

Postby Bufferstop » Sat Feb 17, 2018 10:29 am

If the decoder is in a socket, take it out and refit it, wouldn't hurt to do it two or three times then try again. A non conductive film can develop between the contacts of the decoder and socket, the friction of taking it out and replacing it can break down the film and restore contact. I think this may have been the cause in some of the instances where people have chopped out the socket and hardwired the decoder. This is an acknowledged problem in the IT world.
Those of us old enough to remember the BBC Micro manufactured by Acorn will probably remember that Acorn was perpetually in dire financial straits, (this was before they invented the ARM chip and retired to live of its royalties). At one stage they couldn't afford to have the motherboard contacts gold plated which caused multiple problems, but mostly "won't boot". They owned up to the problem and offered this work around to try before returning it for fixing' ---- "Switch the device off. Raise the front edge high enough to fit a matchbox stood on end, beneath the front. Turn power back on. Snatch the matchbox away as quickly as possible". ---- The resulting shock as the front feet hit the table was often sufficient to restore contact. I'm not suggesting dropping a loco three inches onto the table but perhaps tapping on the top of the decoder with the handle end of a screwdriver might have similar effect.
Growing old, can't avoid it. Growing up, forget it!
My Layout, My Workbench Blog and My Opinions


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