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The Little Big Eight

Posted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 11:14 am
by Longvallon
Hello,
I built this very small On30 /HO/OO scale layout (1.20 x 0.65 m) just for the fun. The radius of the curves is 250mm. It's 6.4% grade everywhere (I hope I use the right words). The clearance at the bridge is 80mm.
I used HO track: old Fleischmann curves (6020) and two Hornby straight sections (R601) slightly shortened. I'm very happy with the result.
Pics speak better than words. Have fun !

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Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 12:35 pm
by Dave
Nice start for an interesting little project 8)

Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 1:42 pm
by Longvallon
Thanks. By popular request, two videos:

http://youtu.be/zq3Ih9Js4Lk

http://youtu.be/gHc_TuroyFM

Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 4:57 pm
by Longvallon
As I need one "British style" train, I ordered (Hatton's) a steam loco, a wagon and a coach.
https://hattonsimages.blob.core.windows ... Qty1_1.jpg
https://hattonsimages.blob.core.windows ... Qty1_1.jpg

Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 6:01 pm
by Dave
In your second video you can certainly see the difference between up hill and down. You have seen my ‘fourways’ Micro which uses the same curves as yours, it’s amazing what can actually negotiate them.

Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 9:02 pm
by Mountain
Wow Longvallon. You're layout looks interesting. As long as your locos are heavy enough and the coaches or waggons aren't too heavy it will work fine.
The blue loco would work well with a Smallbrook Studio Ceto kit or you can scratchbuild a chimney and a larger cab onto it like this one I've made... (The chimney was made from a small ink cartridge. The cab was made with plasticard. The plasticard for the roof was curved by immersing it into boiling water to soften it. I've deepened the bufferbeams ready to use a central buffer and drop type coupling loop).

Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 10:12 pm
by Emettman
Ah, the infamous Fleischmann 6020 curve!

10" radius curves are not at all impossible given careful selection of locos, stock and couplings.
I've both used and recommended the 6020 several times, and have a couple of circle's worth tucked away against possible future need.

Well done.

Chris.

Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 7:34 am
by Longvallon
I regularly check FleaBay but I don't find a single 6020. :?
My layout looks like more a roller coaster than a real layout...but I'm very happy with it.
It's the first time that I made inclines and a bridge successfully. :D

Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 9:40 am
by Emettman
Longvallon wrote:I regularly check FleaBay but I don't find a single 6020. :?


They turn up and go on eBay: check that you'd be getting German, Dutch and Italian listings
My last were from a model shop in Holland.
I hunted via Google *images* for Fleischmann 6020, and seeing whether any of the pictures found were attached to items for sale anywhere.

Chris.

Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 9:45 am
by Longvallon
Maybe we bought all the stock ? :lol:

Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 3:15 pm
by Longvallon
I use a cheap Mehano power supply. It works fine.

MEHANO POWER SUPPLY.jpg
MEHANO POWER SUPPLY.jpg (94.13 KiB) Viewed 720 times

Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 3:27 pm
by Mountain
As cheap controllers go, that looks OK. What is it like to use? The Hornby controller sold in trainsets looks good but isn't that nice to use. How do you change direction with the Mehano controller?

Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 4:09 pm
by Longvallon
Mehano wrote this:

MEHANO.JPG


MEHANO POWER SUPPLY 02.jpg
MEHANO POWER SUPPLY 02.jpg (57.51 KiB) Viewed 709 times

Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 4:58 pm
by Mountain
Over the years budget train controllers in trainsets from Hornby (And others) have varied in how easy or difficult they are to use. I have examples of the last three designsthoughthe second design no longer works. Not sure why yet. The latest design looks excellent and your hand just sits nicely on it, but it is aweful to use. You have to bring the knob back to precisely the 0 (Zero) position before you can change direction. Usually you turn it and the train stops and you go to switch direction and it won't let you! It has to be exactly in the exact zero position. Then, apart from no overload indicator or sound so you know if the overload cut out has tripped (So you are puzzled as to why the train has stopped and go checking the leads or railjoints not realising you've had an overload), you have to then switch off the mains power and wait 25 seconds for the trip to reset itself and switch it back on which is frustrating to try to trace what caused the overload in the first place! Aweful controller to use.
The ones before that were slightly more powerful but not by much, and they didnt have the awful go back to zero switch but had a decent direction switch. You still had no way to know if the overload had tripped and still (Going by memory) had to turn it off at the mains and then back on, but you didnt have to wait long for it to reset. My bugbear with this design was that due to the way it was made I couldn't put my fingers round the knob to control the speed. Only child's fingers were small enough to do this.
The version before that again were good to use. They had a centre off dial thing that one was rotating the edge of it as only the edge protruded from its small case. Any overload didnt take long to reset. Also you didnt have to turn the mains power off. Just turn the dial to zero, and wait a second and apply the power again... (Assuming one had seen to whatever caused the short circuit). I only have two small issues. One was there is no visual or Audi able indication of the overload cutout tripping in and the other was that these controllers were not that powerful (About a third of an amp). Other then that they were good to use. I still have one and it is used for testing trains as it is easier then getting another larger controllers out.

I have had many good controllers which have had a decent amount of power behind them. My first was an AGW. It only did track power, but had a lovely toggle switch for direction and a nice knob for speed control. It pushed out over an amp. I think it was an amp and a half. It was nice to use.
The second was OK. It was a Hornby controller which pushed out half an amp. It worked but felt cheap compared to the AGW.
Then I had a H&M 3000. Overkill! Every possible adjustment all to control a single train... If you have ever seen one and then realize this is all to control a single track DC, then you realize what I mean by overkill!

Re: The Little Big Eight

Posted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 6:12 pm
by Longvallon
Thank you for your very interesting reply. The Mehano controller has an overload safety without sound or light indicator.