Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

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Class 66
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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby Class 66 » Sun Oct 12, 2008 8:10 pm

It looks great Mark. Your baseboard looks like a puzzle in it's own right.

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lawrs1
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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby lawrs1 » Sun Oct 12, 2008 8:19 pm

I agree looking great so far, looking forward to more updates and how this develops
Life is full of should-haves

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allesclar
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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby allesclar » Mon Oct 13, 2008 10:47 am

its amazing when u have planned alot and then let it all go and get them locos out :) where did you get that kit from? im half tempted myself. Great updates here btw.
My N gauge 90's Era layout - viewtopic.php?f=22&t=18182

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SouthernBoy
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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby SouthernBoy » Mon Oct 13, 2008 8:29 pm

Class 66:
The baseboards aren't that complicated. If you think about it - with a big flat-topped baseboard, you build up from the baseboard surface to make hills etc, or cut a hole down to make a valley.
The method I've used simply cuts out the big flat-top baseboard. You just add risers directly to the frame. The risers vary in height according to how high or low the scenery will be. Then you add sections of baseboard cut to shape. The main reason I did this was because my layout is roughly divided into three scenic levels - so I've avoided the building up and cutting down (saving on unnecessary extra wood/weight). At least that's the theory :)

allesclar:
The kit is from Worsley Works.
There's also Bill Bedford Models scroll down the page and you'll see '2mm catalogue' - which is a PDF pricelist.
There may well be others...

Mark

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SouthernBoy
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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby SouthernBoy » Wed Oct 22, 2008 11:22 pm

Frankland update No. 3


Over the last few days I've laid the two main circuits of track and the start of the branch line.
Bottom right you can see where my controllers will be (eventually there will be three). They will be positioned a little lower than shown here. I plan to make a scenic panel that will sit over the top of the controllers for when I just want to set a couple of trains running and sit back and relax.

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I'm trying to work properly and thoroughly through each step of this layout construction - so my next project was to check carriage clearances on the curves.
One problem - the generic Graham Farish carriages I have are a scale 57' long - but Southern Railway EMUs are up 66' long, and I don't have any yet :(
Then I remembered something I have in a dim and dusty recess of the Frankland cupboard: some old Pennsylvania Railroad coaches which come in at around a scale 77'. So if these could clear curves then my EMUs certainly will :) I love the observation car in the last picture ...


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So a series of rigorous tests followed. As you can see, the clearances are fine - and the carriages go quite well with SR green too :shock:


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So now to the station at the rear of the layout. Here's the track placed roughly in position. The two sidings bottom left will be longer than shown here.


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I mocked up the basic shape of how the area will eventually look ... Hopefully the following pictures give an idea of what I'm aiming for.
Btw - The short bits of wood set at an angle at the far ends of the platforms represent steps from the street-level entrance.


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The station is in a cutting (higher ground at the back where the railway passes under The Broadway, falling to ground level at the bottom of the picture). The two lines to the right are Southern Railway (previously LSWR) main lines passing through. On the left is a former LBSCR terminus, which has two carriage sidings in the middle. With the advent of the 'Big Four' what were once two separate stations are now amalgamated into one facility.

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The final picture is a quick experiment I did to see how sandpaper would look as ground-level ballast. In particular I was thinking of how to ballast around the working areas of points (or more specifically - how to avoid ballasting the working areas of points). I thought if I used sandpaper consistently as ground-level ballast all around the layout (and still ballasted in the traditional way between and alongside all rails except the working areas of points - then there'd be a degree of visual consistency and the working areas of points wouldn't look too out of place where they weren't ballasted in the usual way (hope that all makes sense :shock: ) Anyway - just a thought for now - ballasting is a long way off yet.

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As always - comments and suggestions welcome :)

Mark

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Zunnan
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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby Zunnan » Wed Oct 22, 2008 11:38 pm

A slightly coarser grade of sandpaper to match up with the size of proprietary ballast and that could prove a very good idea indeed! So much so that I will have to remember it when I get the chance to rebuild/resurrect Canon Street when I can bring it out of storage. Combined with a cork sub layer, that could prove a very nice barrier for glue when ballasting to keep baseboard sound down. The only downside I can think of is the cost to cover an entire trackbed; is there a cheap enough source of sandpaper to make it viable?

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SouthernBoy
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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby SouthernBoy » Thu Oct 23, 2008 12:44 am

Hello Zunnan, My local handy store sells sandpaper from large rolls and I don't remember it being expensive. Mind you - my layout isn't so big, so total outlay wouldn't be that much anyway :shock:

Zunnan wrote:A slightly coarser grade of sandpaper to match up with the size of proprietary ballast and that could prove a very good idea indeed! ...


I've been pondering over this detail for a while - it seems that whilst ballast around sleepers is topped up and tamped down from time-to-time, the area outside/between sets of tracks sometimes becomes compacted with earth (etc), so looks like earth with just the tops of bits of ballast sticking out. So I think a finer grade may be better - but I'm still experimenting.

Why is Cannon Street in storage? One of my favourite layouts :)

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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby GROTLAND » Thu Oct 23, 2008 3:33 am

Hello Mark

Nice to see the first impressions of the main station. The sand paper looks like it will make a good ground base. A method I found successful for sidings areas was to fill in the gaps between tracks with card upto near sleeper level and with card and then pva jarvis scatter onto the card. When the glue dries you can sand the scatter into all kinds of textures right down to smooth and it never appears contrived. You could then ballast over it. Obviously the card should be much lower than the sleeper tops if you will ballast the sidings. I just used the scatter for ballast in oo, you may be looking at something even finer for siding ballast in n.
Not a great example of this method but it's an idea all the same
Image

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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby Dead Man's Handle » Thu Oct 23, 2008 10:15 am

The mock-up looks great :)

Zunnan wrote:The only downside I can think of is the cost to cover an entire trackbed; is there a cheap enough source of sandpaper to make it viable?


I recently bought 40 sheets (split between 60, 100, & 150 grit) from the poundshop (erm, for a pound). Each sheet is slightly shorter, but slightly wider, than A4 (The paper size, not the Gresley Pacific). I dunno how that compares to buying it from the roll, or if those grits are useful, but that might be a cheap source.

Ade
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SouthernBoy
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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby SouthernBoy » Thu Oct 23, 2008 6:19 pm

That's the sort of finished effect I was looking for Andrew:

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I think there are various ways of doing it, another is mixing combinations of plaster/paint/scatter/ballast.
For me, the sandpaper idea was about finding a clean and consistent method that could be applied to track as well as points.

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SouthernBoy
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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby SouthernBoy » Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:06 am

Frankland update No. 4

Brief update:

The last couple of weeks I've been running trains and fine-tuning track alignment - and I took delivery of my Gaugemaster model UDS twin-track controller 'with Simulation' :) Nothing's wired up properly yet, just the basics to get trains running. And I've been planning my control panels - below are a couple of pictures.

The mimic plan is just a print-out I did to see if it would fit ok (this is all about an exercise in limited space).
The controllers are on a panel which slides under the layout for when not in use.
Scenic sections will sit over the control panels when I just want to set trains running and sit back and enjoy :)

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I also tried to make a short video from my digital camera. I'm a bit disappointed with the quality - but it's a compromise with file size (the original good quality video was over 500mb :shock: )

Frankland on YouTube

Comments and suggestions always welcome

Mark

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allesclar
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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby allesclar » Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:40 am

looking good :) kinda wishing i had all my points electrofrog now :P
My N gauge 90's Era layout - viewtopic.php?f=22&t=18182

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retroman
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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby retroman » Mon Nov 17, 2008 8:37 am

This is an exciting project - real craftsmanship on show! Looking forward to the Art Deco invasion!!
1980s 50 and 37 basher. English Electric Roadie ....... Steam sniffers, move along please.

My Layout: MARSHFIELD WITH ELY BRIDGE
viewtopic.php?f=22&t=14241

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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby Sprintex » Tue Nov 18, 2008 8:45 pm

Excellent work so far - always good to see the first trains running on any layout :wink:


Paul

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SouthernBoy
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Re: Frankland: N gauge Southern Railway

Postby SouthernBoy » Mon Dec 08, 2008 12:17 am

Frankland update No. 5

Hello, in the last episode I'd just started working on my control panels: Since then I've marked out the trackplan with masking tape and drilled holes for the controls.


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Then I painted the whole panel. Later I'll peel off the masking tape and either paint/ink the track plan in, or use dark tape or similar.

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I've installed the rotary switches for cab control, but don't like them so tall, so cut them down so later I can fix nice dials to them instead :)

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Here's the wiring so far (point switches and panel lights still to be added). I'm being quite disciplined and labelling everything as I go.

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Sad but true: The sort of thing that I get excited about is this little tray I made ...

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It sits on one of the cross-braces between two legs ....

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and houses my transformers :) (Yes, I should get out more - but it's freezing out there at the moment!)

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The credit-crunch has some advantages: I got a £68.00 soldering iron set (with stand etc) for just £25.00. That's the good news, the bad news is that at first it just didn't seem to work properly - and I got really, really very annoyed with it. Then I bought a new tip - and now it works like a dream :)
I spent some while practicing soldering wire to rail until I felt sufficiently confident to tackle the track on my layout.

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I don't know if anyone else does it this way - but I decided I would solder wire-to-rail mid-section. So I'm lifting each section of track and cutting the webbing about half-way along, then dropping a blob of solder onto the underside of the rail ...

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Then I tin the wires ...

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Then place the wires onto the rails and apply the iron again so the two melt together ...

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Next I drill two holes for the wires to go through ..

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and the finished result is pretty neat and nothing you'll ever notice once ballasting is done :)

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So that's the update. At the moment it feels like everything is taking forever and I'm lost in the preparation ... but on the other hand I do want the fundamentals to be 100% rock-solid so I have no regrets later.


Thanks for looking. Comments and observations always welcome :)


Mark


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