Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Post pictures and information about your own personal model railway layout that is under construction. Keep members up-to-date with what you are doing and discuss problems that you are having.
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budmanuk
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Re: Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby budmanuk » Sun Aug 17, 2008 8:53 pm

Hi m8internet. It is infact a Digitrax DZ125, so its the same size as a DZ123. I would usually put the decoder on top of the chassis but with some models there is limited clearance, because the inside of the body is flush with the top of the chassis. So you either have to remove some of the body or some of the chassis and modifying the body is a last resort to me. You cant do anything with the class 90 body anyway. I have removed a portion of the the chassis at one end to get space for the decoder. I couldn't see any other way, but if there is I'd be happy to try it. I kept some of the white, yellow and blue wires for the functions incase I ever want to use the decoder for another loco down the line, then I can add to the the existing wires and not need to solder onto the decoder.

Image
Cheers

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budmanuk
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Farish 158 DCC conversion

Postby budmanuk » Wed Aug 20, 2008 3:08 pm

Here are a few pics of a Farish 158 I have converted.

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Last edited by budmanuk on Sat Nov 15, 2008 9:15 am, edited 1 time in total.
Cheers

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budmanuk
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Re: Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby budmanuk » Sun Sep 14, 2008 8:45 am

Can I just ask what is a good program for designing a layout? I'm going to be starting my baseboards soon and I thought it might be an idea to have a rough design for my layout. I'm actually having problems deciding the plan, which shouldn't really be a problem when you work on the real railway, but I'm having layout designers block.. so to speak :)
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budmanuk
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Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby budmanuk » Tue Feb 24, 2009 11:50 pm

wow time flies doesn't it!?! I cant believe its been five months since I posted on here!! Well good news folks, I've actually made some progress in my loft, not much mind but hey as the title says...

Here are a few pics

Starway to Heaven lol
Image

the sleeper
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i've now started to insulate between the rafters
Image

I tried a woodland scenics diorama kit too, not finished yet
Image
Cheers

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ste234
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Re: Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby ste234 » Sat Apr 04, 2009 9:52 am

Hi,
that second last photo looks good, it shows what lenght you are planning to go i assume? are you going all the way round the loft? coz if you are in n gauge it will be very interesting!!
Cheers
Ste.
'Springfield', N gauge Modern Era Layout

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briantwigley
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Re: Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby briantwigley » Sat Apr 04, 2009 1:49 pm

Looking good. I have the same Farish 158 in Scotrail Livery, I'm going to have to put a decoder in it somehow, no idea how to hard wire one in!

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m8internet
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Re: Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby m8internet » Sat Apr 04, 2009 3:16 pm

I have started construction of a secondary layout, which is Glasgow Queen Street, as per the track layout during the 1980s
Obviously there is no roof canopy, otherwise you'd never see the trains!
This allows me to use just one of my fiddle yards, which makes it ideal for transporting to exhibitions outside Scotland

Equally, most sets can be operated in push-pull, so the only locos which need uncoupling / coupling (which is fiddly and untidy) will be non Class 47/7
Sadly this means all my freight will be redundant!
Glasgow Queen Street Model Railway layout : modern image N gauge using DCC

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budmanuk
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Re: Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby budmanuk » Sun Apr 05, 2009 5:59 pm

briantwigley wrote:Looking good. I have the same Farish 158 in Scotrail Livery, I'm going to have to put a decoder in it somehow, no idea how to hard wire one in!

Cheers



I will post pics of how I did mine. It's not too difficult, but you have to be brave enought to hacksaw the chassis :? to get room for the decoder and cut grooves with a dremel for the wires :shock: . 8) :D
Cheers

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briantwigley
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Re: Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby briantwigley » Sun Apr 05, 2009 6:13 pm

Sounds fun! Thanks for that it'll be a great help

Cheers

Ryan

m8internet
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Re: Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby m8internet » Sun Apr 05, 2009 7:18 pm

budmanuk wrote:I will post pics of how I did mine. It's not too difficult, but you have to be brave enought to hacksaw the chassis :? to get room for the decoder and cut grooves with a dremel for the wires

STOP
You don't need to hacksaw or heavily modify the Class 158 chassis in order to fit a decoder
The only thing you will need to modify is the body roof, removing just enough of the clear plastic for clearance of the decoder
http://www.rmweb.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=49&t=22859
Glasgow Queen Street Model Railway layout : modern image N gauge using DCC

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budmanuk
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Re: Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby budmanuk » Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:34 pm

m8internet wrote:
budmanuk wrote:I will post pics of how I did mine. It's not too difficult, but you have to be brave enought to hacksaw the chassis :? to get room for the decoder and cut grooves with a dremel for the wires

STOP
You don't need to hacksaw or heavily modify the Class 158 chassis in order to fit a decoder
The only thing you will need to modify is the body roof, removing just enough of the clear plastic for clearance of the decoder
http://www.rmweb.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=49&t=22859


Hi Marcus. Yes I am aware of that method. Having to prise the roof off a 158 is not a nice thing to do. It is honestly (in my opinion) much easier and safer to cut away a bit of the chassis. I suppose my skills must lie more in metalwork :wink: lol. The person writing the article in your link admits the method you are suggesting is a bit of a nightmare. Honestly the way I'll describe, I find, is more reliable and better for easy chassis access. Oh and incase of a mess up, I think there is more of a chance gaining spare chassis parts than 158 Scotrail bodies since I have already enquired with Bachmann to purchase some. There are none left!! :(

Anyways, this may sound complicated, but I'll do anything to have to aviod messing around with my trains bodies. All you have to do is choose which end you want to install the decoder, both ends are the same so it doesn't really matter. You really want to make the section you cut away is as big as possible, because this helps with the wires coming off the end of the decoder and being fed in the the channels you will make with the dremel. Using my pictures and your own 158 chassis as a guide, you can see the kind of dimentions I'm talking about.

Ok to make the cut-out section for the decoder. Once you have dismantled the chassis and have it in two halves, place the first half in a vice. I like to use a cloth so the grips in the vice dont make any nasty marks on the chassis (or if you have a vice with wooden jaws etc. use that). Score across both ends of the section to be removed so you know your limits and make a cut where you have scored. When cutting down through the chassis be sure to leave enough metal at the bottom of the cuts to support the decoder or you are going to be left with just a big hole :shock: NOT GOOD!!!

Ok so now you have cut at either end of the section to be removed, make similar cuts 1mm apart across the chassis for the length of the section, once all cuts are done you should be left with thin splines of metal sticking up from the chassis, use a hacksaw at an angle to remove the splines and finish off the now recessed section with a file, still taking care not to remove too much metal. (you should be left with a fine layer of metal in the thinnest parts). Whilst the chassis is split you also have to remove the bits of metal covering the brush clips. These are easily removed by using the dremel to cut along the top and bottom of the section to be removed and then lever off with a pair of pliers.
Repeat for the other side of the chassis. (sounds easy doesn't it!) :wink:
Finaly use a dremel to make channels in the chassis for the decoder wires, as per my pics. Re-assemble the chassis, sit in your decoder and wires and trim wires to length.

Powering up. Using the chassis screw for mounting the decoder feed wires, you may have to scrape off some paint to get a decent connection under the screw head. Infact I find it useful to solder a heavier wire to the end of the decoder wire, because the fine wire used with the decoder sometimes gets pulled into the plastic insulator with the screw thread and does not actually make contact with the metal chassis.
Run the motor feed wires along the channels you made to the motor contacts and solder onto the brush clip, taking care that the solder joint is flush with the side of the chassis. The body will fit on perfectly, with no modifications! 8)

If anything is not clear, I'm sorry I will do my best to correct it, just ask.

Here are the pics...

Here you can see the kind of length and depth of the section to be removed...
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In this pic you can (just) see the channel of the motor wire and where the metal covering the brush clip has been removed and wire soldered to...
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Recess and wire channels...
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This layer of metal is realy quite thin, you have to be careful...
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The decoder power wires are run along the centre split of the chassis and then into channels to the chassis screw...
Image

This is where the thicker wire comes in, add a few mm to each wire, it's much easier to get a good connection. Repeat for both sides!
Image

Not the best pic, but here it is for good measure!
Image

I'm not intending to start a debate/argument about the best way to do this. This topic is about my layout etc. and this is the method I use for convertion. Thats all.
Cheers

m8internet
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Re: Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby m8internet » Mon Apr 06, 2009 6:19 am

I've just noticed they also mention you need to remove a section from the chassis
In the picture it looked like the well to the motor, but it is in fact the side
That had me confused, so there is no major difference you do need to remove this area of the chassis
However there is LOADS of room to thread the wires between the motor and decoder, through the gap in the chassis, removing the need to bevel in to the side of the chassis
The disadvantage is that if the motor or decoder fails then the chassis needs to be stripped again, but you'd probably need to do that anyway!
Glasgow Queen Street Model Railway layout : modern image N gauge using DCC

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budmanuk
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Re: Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby budmanuk » Mon Apr 06, 2009 9:58 pm

ste234 wrote:Hi,
that second last photo looks good, it shows what lenght you are planning to go i assume? are you going all the way round the loft? coz if you are in n gauge it will be very interesting!!
Cheers
Ste.


Hello there! Thanks for the comments. Yes I am indeed planning to go all the way round the loft. I'ts taking me some time but I want to get the loft best insulated as I can, I dont want my trains in a damp, cold loft come winter time. There is stuff all over the place up there right now, so when I take any real wide pictures, it just looks a complete mess! So once its a bit more tidy I'll post some pics, the bench all the way round should be done by then too.
Cheers

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ste234
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Re: Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby ste234 » Mon Apr 06, 2009 10:04 pm

budmanuk wrote:Yes I am indeed planning to go all the way round the loft. I'ts taking me some time but I want to get the loft best insulated as I can, I dont want my trains in a damp, cold loft come winter time. There is stuff all over the place up there right now, so when I take any real wide pictures, it just looks a complete mess! So once its a bit more tidy I'll post some pics, the bench all the way round should be done by then too.

Well going all round the loft will be realy good i am sure, you will get lots of operation on it. All else i can realy say is im very jealous :lol: our loft is full of junk from probably 20 years ago and its impossible to stand up in so its a no go!
Cheers and good luck :P
Ste.
'Springfield', N gauge Modern Era Layout

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briantwigley
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Re: Slow progress N Scotland region layout/project

Postby briantwigley » Wed Apr 08, 2009 8:12 am

Thanks for posting that guide, it will help me a lot. Just one other question, where do I solder the ends of the wires to?

Cheers

Ryan


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