wood for baseboard frame

Discussion of model railway baseboard design and construction
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Michaelaface
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wood for baseboard frame

Postby Michaelaface » Fri May 12, 2017 1:35 am

What wood would you all recommend to build the frame for a baseboard out of? Up to now I've used "2x1" lengths but I'm forever having problems with it being warped and twisted, tried several retailers but the issues remain no matter what

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TimberSurf
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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby TimberSurf » Fri May 12, 2017 7:22 am

First of all, the deeper the frame, the stronger the structure, so less likely to bend or warp. 2x1 is OK for a "fixed" layout, but needs very regular support from wall, legs, rafters, etc. The minimum I would use is 3 inch deep and ideally 4 inch deep with rungs every 18 -24 inches. The alternative is plywood sides, less likely to warp and stronger, so thinner width can be used but still needs to be 3-4 deep.
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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby Tinker » Fri May 12, 2017 8:07 am

The problem with PAR Timber is it will warp when taking into a house with heating you can do either clamp it together to keep it straight or screw and glue straight to the baseboard.
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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby End2end » Fri May 12, 2017 10:43 am

Excuse my naievity but what is PAR timber?
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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby roganty » Fri May 12, 2017 10:53 am

Planed All Round

TBH, not something I've ever heard of until just now when I googled it :)
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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby End2end » Fri May 12, 2017 10:57 am

AHH! We learn something new everyday. :)
Thanks for enlightening me roganty. :D
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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby TimberSurf » Fri May 12, 2017 11:56 am

Tree trunks are cut up into planks with a large diameter rotary saw, that leaves a rough surface with curved marks in it. That's fine for hidden structures or out doors work, but unpaintable and rough on the hands!
So most wood is smoothed by a "thichness" planer, that also gives it very defined dimensions as well as a "smooth to the touch", paintable surface.
Wood is cut to nominal inches, but after planing looses 1/16" on each side, so PAR 2x1 is actualy about 1 7/8" x 7/8". These days they kindly tend to quote actual PAR dimensions (20.5mm x 44mm). Just to confuse the issue, they tend to call it PSE these days (Planed Sqaure Edge), due to the fact you can now get planed timber with rounded corners! (called PRE, commonly know as CLS taken from Canadian Lumber Standard as Canadians introduced it)
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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby End2end » Fri May 12, 2017 1:13 pm

Thanks for the additional information Timbersurf. :)
Weirdly you'd think they would plane it to the proper 2x1" dimensions instead of smaller.
It must cause chippies no end of trouble. :lol:
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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby Mountain » Fri May 12, 2017 2:12 pm

One thing I found (My dad was a carpenter so I should have understood better!) is to avoid buying cheaper packs of 2x1 lengths as when you get them home and take the tightly wrapped plastic the wood springs open in every direction where it was straight in the pack, as a few straight pieces hold the warped ones straight. Some companies have an art to how to pack warped wood next to straight and pass it all off as straight wood!
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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby TimberSurf » Fri May 12, 2017 4:12 pm

As Mountain said, timber is graded and what you get in DIY stores is the very lowest (whitewood), usually fast grown softwood like pine http://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-Whitewoo ... e/p/107147. You would not choose cheap pine to build your furniture and expect it to last years! DIY stores do sell better quality redwood, but you pay for what you get! http://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-Redwood- ... 9000036456
Bone up on terminology here http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Timber_basics
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Michaelaface
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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby Michaelaface » Tue May 16, 2017 9:36 pm

ahh thank you for the detailed replies team! I've a much clearer idea of what went wrong and why now, thank you!

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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby Dad-1 » Tue May 16, 2017 10:03 pm

Not that I've bothered, but 'Kiln Dried' is supposed to be less prone to any movement,
but in reality a certain amount of movement must be expected with timber. It helps if
sealed with varnish on both sides to try and keep a constant moisture content.
I prefer ply sides at least 3" (75 mm) deep, but my individual boards are never more than
40" long ...... longer boards deserve deeper sides AND additional honeycomb reinforcing
to prevent mid board sag.

Anyway good to hear you're still getting up to mischief !!

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Michaelaface
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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby Michaelaface » Fri May 19, 2017 12:22 am

it was mostly just one length which somehow had ended up horribly warped and twisted, but it's all fine now, the baseboard is up, very level, very sturdy and awaiting the next stage of development

#spoilers

layout topic coming soon then I guess

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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby RAFHAAA96 » Fri May 19, 2017 11:22 am

My next layout planned for installation in a large shed when I return to UK will use PAR as a perimeter frame around the shed walls but longitudinal and cross beams and operating well face boards will be plywood, built eggbox fashion for simplicity and strength.
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Michaelaface
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Re: wood for baseboard frame

Postby Michaelaface » Sun May 21, 2017 1:05 am

I've made an instagram for posting my progress if any of you are interested?

https://www.instagram.com/mbhmodelrailways/


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