loft boards

Discussion of model railway baseboard design and construction
User avatar
TK421
Posts: 962
Joined: Thu Mar 17, 2011 1:42 pm
Location: Faringdon with one R

Re: loft boards

Postby TK421 » Tue Nov 20, 2012 4:07 pm

Tell you what Jeff it's exactly as you described it, the house is warmer but the insulation is above the joists and packed into the eves. The xmas tree is to come down soon so I'll have a proper look then and see if i can rectify the situation. I didn't pay for it so I can always remove the lot :lol:
Commander tear this ship apart until you have found them track plans!

jcm@gwr
Posts: 229
Joined: Sun Sep 04, 2011 9:54 pm
Location: Stevenage

Re: loft boards

Postby jcm@gwr » Tue Nov 20, 2012 5:08 pm

Not surprised!
I recently had to do some work for a mate, which included fitting
new down-lights and a fan-light, in his bathroom.

The plasterboard had started turn brown and crumble because the
heat from the lights could not escape, also the transformers kept
cutting out.

I suggested the same to him and told him to put the surplus stuff
on the free-cycle website.

Also, I had a neighbour who had the muppets in for 'free' insulation,
couple of months later she went into the loft for something.
All the cardboard storage boxes were damp from condensation that was
dripping from the rafters!

There really should be some sort of guidelines/control for this, at the
moment they are doing more harm than good, all because some-one
thought it would be a good idea to increase the recommended thickness
of insulation, without checking possible side-effects/problems.

Cheers, Jeff

robhar
Posts: 34
Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 8:24 pm
Location: Leeds

Re: loft boards

Postby robhar » Thu Nov 22, 2012 2:04 pm

I guess the clue in the OP is the word 'free'! Ok, so these companies are attracting government funding to install insulation but seeing as you ain't a paying customer and I doubt the government is checking on the quality of their work then there isn't much of an incentive for them to do a good job! I agree with jcm - the whole scheme needs properly regulating and monitoring.

User avatar
centenary
Posts: 167
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2009 3:08 pm

Re: loft boards

Postby centenary » Sat Dec 29, 2012 1:01 pm

An older thread now maybe but still worthwhile pointing out, there's a world of difference to getting your loft boarded out for storeage compared for regular use such as a model railway, hobby area or living space. I've investigated this as I have a very large "L" shaped loft area which would be ideal for a layout and extra living space. Only trouble is, to make it worthwhile, it would cost a fortune and needs permanent fixed access otherwise it is just 'loft space' and not a conversion so, when you come to sell, you wont realise the money you have invested.

Unless your house is old ie anything pre 1960 and even then, I'd suggest getting professional advice, in the loft you are effectively walking on ceiling joists. These arent designed for taking any real load such as walking about on even if boarded (you are adding a lot of extra weight with just the boards themselves).

To be able to make your loft a proper useable area, you need additional (floor) joists capable of bearing the weight of the boards and regularly being walked on, to be fitted. If you start off just boarding the loft in a modern house you will create all sorts of issues for the ceilings underneath. This is probably the main reason why proper loft conversions are so expensive.

Some loft conversion regulations have been eased as regards planning permission etc but access and minimum headroom still apply if you want an 'official' permanent living area.

User avatar
TK421
Posts: 962
Joined: Thu Mar 17, 2011 1:42 pm
Location: Faringdon with one R

Re: loft boards

Postby TK421 » Sun Dec 30, 2012 11:52 pm

It's the same conclusion I came too mate, the loft will have to be sorted at some point regardless if a layout goes up there or not but for now I'll use the spare room.
Commander tear this ship apart until you have found them track plans!

Sam Aiuto
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Feb 06, 2014 1:01 am

Re: loft boards

Postby Sam Aiuto » Fri Feb 21, 2014 1:02 am

First off, my advice, as with every other post is seek professional advice. I would hope that you could get a few quotes for free. I can appreciate confusion with the water tanks mentioned previously. But as you can probably understand, the span of the rafters the tank was sat on can have a massive influence on the load it can take without deformation or failure. Even a stud wall below could take the load from above as long at there were 'column' members to transfer the loads to 'load bearing' walls. I have read that an adaptation of a roof could be done by simply using deeper beams between existing beams so that the original beams do not take any additional load; they purely hold up the ceiling and services from below. The deeper beams, resting on the internal skin of the house, would sit higher than the original beams and allow boards to be attached, keeping clear of the original beams. Using modern timber will provide you with the support necessary depending on the grade. All structural timber available through builders merchants should be stamped with the grade that corresponds to their strength; a C16 for example is of coniferous wood with a strength of 16kN/m^2. This is the same as 1630kg per square meter of area. Over one and a half tonnes (metric). Timber in compression (when used as a beam) is stronger still. But all of this strength is relative to the span of the beam and the spacing. This is however, a calculation for an experienced person and I would never suggest a DIY'd attempt without professional advice. I know this is a little off the OP, but just some interesting points to consider.

User avatar
Bufferstop
Posts: 12926
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2010 12:06 pm
Location: Bottom end of N. Warks line

Re: loft boards

Postby Bufferstop » Fri Feb 21, 2014 9:43 am

Might as well add my twopen'th. Right back at the beginning the available space for a layout was quoted at two feet from the floor. I managed to get two foot six and it was literally a pain in the neck. By the time I broached the subject of the spare room with my wife, I discovered she would prefer it. She loved all the "little buildings and things" and wanted to see how it all went together, but an old injury put the loft ladder out of bounds for her. Result new layout in a spare room, and when we did some serious re-modelling of the house a dedicate space for the railway was on the list of requirements.
John W
aka Bufferstop.
Growing old, can't avoid it. Growing up, forget it!
My Layout, My Workbench Blog and My Opinions

User avatar
TK421
Posts: 962
Joined: Thu Mar 17, 2011 1:42 pm
Location: Faringdon with one R

Re: loft boards

Postby TK421 » Fri Apr 04, 2014 2:37 pm

Cheers for the updated advice but alot has changed since the orginal post. the recurring crack is a result of the house moving due to the streees of being an end terrace and I have fixed that problem, the loft is alot stronger than orginaly thought. I did move into the spare Bedroom however a small person now requires a room so that layout has been dismantled. I no longer have the time or money to sort the loft out and was never very keen on all the trusses being in the way so I'm currently looking at a fold away layout that I can set up in the conservatory.
Commander tear this ship apart until you have found them track plans!


Return to “Baseboard Design and Construction”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest