Gaps in track

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crazypotter
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Gaps in track

Postby crazypotter » Thu Aug 15, 2019 2:48 pm

Hi All. I have noticed on some layouts (you tube etc) that there are gaps in certain places on the track where it seems a couple of sleepers have been removed. Can any of you guys enlighten me on why this is done?. Probably an obvious answer. Cheers

Bigmet
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Re: Gaps in track

Postby Bigmet » Thu Aug 15, 2019 4:06 pm

Usually because the layout has been created from flexitrack, and where the railjoiners go on the rail ends, instead of slicing the chairs off the tops of the end sleepers to provide clearance for the railjoiners, instead the sleepers are completely removed as a simpler solution. Looks ugly but functions OK.

crazypotter
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Re: Gaps in track

Postby crazypotter » Thu Aug 15, 2019 7:10 pm

Bigmet wrote:Usually because the layout has been created from flexitrack, and where the railjoiners go on the rail ends, instead of slicing the chairs off the tops of the end sleepers to provide clearance for the railjoiners, instead the sleepers are completely removed as a simpler solution. Looks ugly but functions OK.

Thanks for the explanation bignet. Have to say does look a bit odd but I suppose it's all about practicality!.

DonB
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Re: Gaps in track

Postby DonB » Thu Aug 15, 2019 8:57 pm

Seeing flexible track laid in that manner makes me cringe - It really is very simple to slice off those rail chairs with a sharp knife.
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Ironduke
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Re: Gaps in track

Postby Ironduke » Thu Aug 15, 2019 10:37 pm

DonB wrote:It really is very simple to slice off those rail chairs with a sharp knife.


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Bigmet
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Re: Gaps in track

Postby Bigmet » Fri Aug 16, 2019 10:09 am

"It's the melty way kid!" Don't think I have ever seen that technique before.

The trackbase gives off horrible acrid fumes if the soldering iron bit touches it, which happens often enough when having to revise or repair wiring after tracklaying. Think I will stick to slicing the chairs off with the scalpel.

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luckymucklebackit
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Re: Gaps in track

Postby luckymucklebackit » Fri Aug 16, 2019 10:13 am

In fairness, the only photographs I have seen of this method are on partially completed layouts, i.e track laid and being tested, no scenic work done yet. Some folk prefer to do it this way then insert one or more sleepers (with the chairs sliced flush with the sleeper top) under the rails immediately before ballasting. I have done this a couple of times.

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b308
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Re: Gaps in track

Postby b308 » Fri Aug 16, 2019 11:33 am

That's the way I do it, Jim.

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Bufferstop
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Re: Gaps in track

Postby Bufferstop » Fri Aug 16, 2019 5:05 pm

Simply slicing off the chairs sometimes isn't enough as you have to also accommodate the thickness of the rail joiner, especially if it's an insulating one. So I go for removing the sleepers then sliding in some thinned down ones once the track is laid and proved ok.
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Ironduke
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Re: Gaps in track

Postby Ironduke » Fri Aug 16, 2019 10:28 pm

Bigmet wrote:The trackbase gives off horrible acrid fumes if the soldering iron bit touches it,

Bufferstop wrote:Simply slicing off the chairs sometimes isn't enough as you have to also accommodate the thickness of the rail joiner


I have a temp controlled soldering iron so I turned it right down. I found the method quicker and easier than trying to slide the tip of a scalpel under the rail, particularly with n scale track. If your scalpel blade isn't sharp it's quite an effort to get through the plastic.
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Mountain
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Re: Gaps in track

Postby Mountain » Sat Aug 17, 2019 7:13 pm

DonB wrote:Seeing flexible track laid in that manner makes me cringe - It really is very simple to slice off those rail chairs with a sharp knife.



I tend to agree here. Does not take long to gently remove the chairs with a sharp knife and do a neat job, but as long as it works and gets the trains running!
Behind the scenes track doesn't matter so much. Almost anything goes here as long as things can run on it! In the past when I had a shortage of flexible track or straight track, but an excess of old curves, I straightened out the curves and used them in sidings with an excess of ballast mixed with coal dust and other things to hide the missaligned sleepers. They were in position for a few years like this until I could afford new track... Sidings always used older track on real railways. Worn out mainline track was ideal for sidings where wagons would be parked, where speeds were very slow...

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Bufferstop
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Re: Gaps in track

Postby Bufferstop » Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:33 pm

I used to chop and bend old set track to give non standard points and crossings. Back then it was all plated steel so the rust son set in on the cut ends and filed flats. The longest lived item was a crossing of two second radius curves, no way I could have made that from standard pieces. By the time Hornby got the message and switched to nickel silver it was too late. I'd migrated to code 75 which is much easier to form into shape.
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Bigmet
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Re: Gaps in track

Postby Bigmet » Sun Aug 18, 2019 5:26 pm

Bufferstop wrote:Simply slicing off the chairs sometimes isn't enough as you have to also accommodate the thickness of the rail joiner, especially if it's an insulating one...

I assume that it is the Peco insulating rail joiner to which you refer? The code 100 type was a poor piece from my first experience of it, and I wrote to Peco (pen, paper, stamp, post box, that being the sole method available to me at the time) and received in time a reply which told me it was a groundbreaking product unmatched in its efficiency, and had NASA had access to this magnificent technology the Apollo 13 mission would have gone smoothly.

Well, they were welcome to that opinion, the fact that the base of it would not fit in the gap between rail and sleeper base of their own Streamline points without leading to a hump in the rail top, told me different. Since when I have left the things in the shop for the useless trash they are, and used a dab of Araldite between rail ends requiring to be insulated from each other.

Consequently I have not an idea whether the code 75 equivalents are good, bad or indifferent in function, but would be happy to learn from those who have used them.


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