The internet and its effect on online sales

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Phat Controller
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Re: The internet and its effect on online sales

Postby Phat Controller » Wed Dec 05, 2018 4:40 am

sparkhill I understand your frustration, everyone pays through the nose over here not just ex-pats!

I also had and have no sympathy for them either, as they have caused the demise of the best little model shop I have ever patroned. Chris (the owner) did his best to keep going, but could not compete with the "main street dealers" prices, and the stress of having to pay his rent, as well as keeping stock on the shelves, got to him. I do really miss him.

Now the internet has stamped its' authority on our niche market, the retailers have been reined in, to an extent - they still need to work harder, as I don't believe their prices are consumer orientated, but are more geared to their own profit margins.
research = asking a bloke who knows a bloke who said something vaguely similar to what I wanted to hear! - Tony (aka the Phat Controller)

Bigmet
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Re: The internet and its effect on online sales

Postby Bigmet » Wed Dec 05, 2018 8:44 am

Back with the models, I will be wary of new Bachmann twin bogie traction since the reports of poor pick-up on the AL5/class 85 and EE type 4/class 40. I have not bought the mk2 version of the latter, which was on the 'buy when budget permits' list, but has now been struck off after reading online comment. I have a mk1 version which is a rock solid performer thanks to proven reliable and easily user adjusted pick-up wipers bearing on wheelbacks. It has always looked good enough to me, despite the clear error in the roof and side detail: it smply doesnt bother me for some reason.

The new method of pick-up via collars on axle stubs, adjacent to the grease of the gear train, bad idea and fruitful of problems reported online. And that's when new. Dependent on materials choices I have question marks over longevity in service too, because these combined pick-ups and bearing collars are carrying a heavy loco casting. As an operator of models above all else, I wore through the split chassis models very fast as the plating essential for good conduction was worn away. I will let others discover what sort of longevity this more recently introduced construction offers.

I am not against this general pick up principle, Hornby's Brush 2/class 30&31 mechanism picks up with a brass strip riding on the axle ends and this is efficient and reliable, because it is in a good clean location. It is also not carrying the full load of the loco's weight. But taken altogether, my prefered pick-up method on driven wheels wil always be wheelback wipers, simple and easy to adjust for the user, with a well proven reliability and longevity, and readily repairable when worn by retipping.

Byegad
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Re: The internet and its effect on online sales

Postby Byegad » Wed Dec 05, 2018 11:24 am

As an avid N gauger, I won't buy a Dapol locomotive in store. Their terrible failure rate 'out of the box' means buying with a guaranteed 30 day no quibble return makes it safer to buy online, run in, or at least attempt to do so and decide whether to keep it. Out of 5 9Fs I kept 2, out of 3 Britannias all were returned as faulty.

If I were to buy in our 'local' model shops, at 15 and 20 miles from home, I would be paying parking charges to return these items.

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Bufferstop
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Re: The internet and its effect on online sales

Postby Bufferstop » Wed Dec 05, 2018 2:38 pm

Now there's something the "high street" retailer can do to set themselves apart from the box shifters, install a test track along the counter and test each one before the customer's eyes. It used to be common practice, time for them to bring it back! Keep it in the box collectors can still opt to have it in the unopened box if that's what counts for them :roll:
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D605Eagle
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Re: The internet and its effect on online sales

Postby D605Eagle » Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:38 pm

Bigmet wrote:Back with the models, I will be wary of new Bachmann twin bogie traction since the reports of poor pick-up on the AL5/class 85 and EE type 4/class 40. I have not bought the mk2 version of the latter, which was on the 'buy when budget permits' list, but has now been struck off after reading online comment. I have a mk1 version which is a rock solid performer thanks to proven reliable and easily user adjusted pick-up wipers bearing on wheelbacks. It has always looked good enough to me, despite the clear error in the roof and side detail: it smply doesnt bother me for some reason.

The new method of pick-up via collars on axle stubs, adjacent to the grease of the gear train, bad idea and fruitful of problems reported online. And that's when new. Dependent on materials choices I have question marks over longevity in service too, because these combined pick-ups and bearing collars are carrying a heavy loco casting. As an operator of models above all else, I wore through the split chassis models very fast as the plating essential for good conduction was worn away. I will let others discover what sort of longevity this more recently introduced construction offers.

I am not against this general pick up principle, Hornby's Brush 2/class 30&31 mechanism picks up with a brass strip riding on the axle ends and this is efficient and reliable, because it is in a good clean location. It is also not carrying the full load of the loco's weight. But taken altogether, my prefered pick-up method on driven wheels wil always be wheelback wipers, simple and easy to adjust for the user, with a well proven reliability and longevity, and readily repairable when worn by retipping.

A friend of mine has 5 AL5's and 6 class 40's, 3 Mk1's, and 3 Mk2's. All 11 of them are superb performers, he's never had any problems with any of them, the Mk'2 40s for example have terrific haulage capacity being a 1C-C1 instead of a 1B1-1B1 The only Bachmann non steam loco that has given him issues was a class 25 which was caused by a slipping driveshaft cup on one of the power bogies. His layout has some fearsome hills on it and locos don't last very long as a rule (he uses it an awful lot) but these particular locos are lasting very well.

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flying scotsman123
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Re: The internet and its effect on online sales

Postby flying scotsman123 » Wed Dec 05, 2018 5:36 pm

Bufferstop wrote:Now there's something the "high street" retailer can do to set themselves apart from the box shifters, install a test track along the counter and test each one before the customer's eyes. It used to be common practice, time for them to bring it back! Keep it in the box collectors can still opt to have it in the unopened box if that's what counts for them :roll:


The model shop at Cheltenham still has at least one, possibly two. Useful for some of the more suspect looking second hand stock!
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Mountain
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Re: The internet and its effect on online sales

Postby Mountain » Wed Dec 05, 2018 5:52 pm

Byegad wrote:As an avid N gauger, I won't buy a Dapol locomotive in store. Their terrible failure rate 'out of the box' means buying with a guaranteed 30 day no quibble return makes it safer to buy online, run in, or at least attempt to do so and decide whether to keep it. Out of 5 9Fs I kept 2, out of 3 Britannias all were returned as faulty.

If I were to buy in our 'local' model shops, at 15 and 20 miles from home, I would be paying parking charges to return these items.


You don't seem to have had much luck there by the looks of it. I know the older 00 gauge Dapol was good stuff. Not tried N gauge. Goes to show that to manufacture a model is not always as easy as it seems.

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sparkhill
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Re: The internet and its effect on online sales

Postby sparkhill » Wed Dec 05, 2018 7:21 pm

Bufferstop wrote:Now there's something the "high street" retailer can do to set themselves apart from the box shifters, install a test track along the counter and test each one before the customer's eyes. It used to be common practice, time for them to bring it back! Keep it in the box collectors can still opt to have it in the unopened box if that's what counts for them :roll:


Bufferstop I agree 100% but could not help smiling when I read your thread, a while ago a mate and myself visited what is known as Australia's Hobby Shop in Brisbane for once they had something I actually wanted, there in a glass display case was a Farish 3F great I thought and as they had one of those roller bearing loco testing thingys on the counter I asked if they would test the loco for me, I nearly fell off me perch when the manager told me he would not test the loco because once tested it would become second hand, I asked this ding bat if he was serious sure enough he was and stuck to his guns, after telling him to shove the loco where the sun dont shine and being told never to set foot in his shop again we walked out laughing, as a sequel to this story the manager got the sack a few days later maybe the other staff thought he was oit of line as well, funny now they have a test track and are happy to test locos but have decided to cut back on model railway stock.
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Re: The internet and its effect on online sales

Postby GWR_fan » Wed Dec 05, 2018 9:09 pm

Nobby,
I had a similar situation many, many years ago in a major hobby store in Western Sydney. A friend and I were out to buy N gauge items and the store in question had plenty on offer. I gathered up a large amount of N gauge, at the time exceeding $500.00 and was waiting at the counter to be served. My then friend wanted to test a loco and asked the assistant if he could use the test track as the assistant was busy serving another customer. As my friend was behind the counter testing the loco the owner of the store walked into this section of the shop and demanded in a terse tone, abusing him in the process as to why my friend was behind the counter. I advised him that the assistant had given him permission to do so. The owner then abused my friend and told him to get out of the store. I then stated to the owner that if this is how he treats customers then I would not be purchasing anything either and placed my hoard of intended purchases on the counter and left the store. We never went back there.

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sparkhill
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Re: The internet and its effect on online sales

Postby sparkhill » Thu Dec 06, 2018 4:42 am

GWR_fan wrote:Nobby,
I had a similar situation many, many years ago in a major hobby store in Western Sydney. A friend and I were out to buy N gauge items and the store in question had plenty on offer. I gathered up a large amount of N gauge, at the time exceeding $500.00 and was waiting at the counter to be served. My then friend wanted to test a loco and asked the assistant if he could use the test track as the assistant was busy serving another customer. As my friend was behind the counter testing the loco the owner of the store walked into this section of the shop and demanded in a terse tone, abusing him in the process as to why my friend was behind the counter. I advised him that the assistant had given him permission to do so. The owner then abused my friend and told him to get out of the store. I then stated to the owner that if this is how he treats customers then I would not be purchasing anything either h placed my hoard of intended purchases on the counter and left the store. We never went back there.



Yes all the more reason to buy online, there are some arrogant so and so's out there and then they say "have a nice day" when they couldn't care less if you got run over by a bus.
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Nobby

Byegad
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Re: The internet and its effect on online sales

Postby Byegad » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:24 am

Mountain wrote:
Byegad wrote:As an avid N gauger, I won't buy a Dapol locomotive in store. Their terrible failure rate 'out of the box' means buying with a guaranteed 30 day no quibble return makes it safer to buy online, run in, or at least attempt to do so and decide whether to keep it. Out of 5 9Fs I kept 2, out of 3 Britannias all were returned as faulty.

If I were to buy in our 'local' model shops, at 15 and 20 miles from home, I would be paying parking charges to return these items.


You don't seem to have had much luck there by the looks of it. I know the older 00 gauge Dapol was good stuff. Not tried N gauge. Goes to show that to manufacture a model is not always as easy as it seems.


I now have far too many locos, at the last count over 200, not all bought new. While I've had issues with a couple of Graham Farish locos from new, Dapol Steam locos seem to have far more issues than they should. I also bought a Dapol Grange this year, which stuttered fast then slow for no apparent reason for 4 hours running in before it went back, the replacement was even worse so went back for a refund. I used to model continental outline and Fleischmann, Arnold and Minitrix locos all ran perfectly straight out of the box. They still do!


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