Hornby 2-BIL question

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4472
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Joined: Fri Sep 16, 2005 2:16 pm

Hornby 2-BIL question

Postby 4472 » Mon Jan 08, 2018 11:44 pm

Got one for Christmas and in the box it a little set of transfers. 2 sets of numbers and 2 white (1 big 1 small) I am not an expert on prototypes and there are no instructions. What are they for ?? They are about a 1/4 inch in size
Great grandson of Peter Benjamin Spicer (LNWR retired)

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Bigglesof266
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Location: Australia

Re: Hornby 2-BIL question

Postby Bigglesof266 » Tue Jan 09, 2018 2:15 am

They are route codes. Stick your preference on the black code plates at the ends of each 2 BIL set.

Illustration here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Rail_Class_401#/media/File:2-bil_emu.jpg

RFS
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Re: Hornby 2-BIL question

Postby RFS » Tue Jan 09, 2018 9:01 am

Details of route codes here - http://www.semgonline.com/headcodes/eheadcodes.html

Just need to decide what route your model railway follows and choose an appropriate number. :D
Robert Smith

4472
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Re: Hornby 2-BIL question

Postby 4472 » Tue Jan 09, 2018 11:55 am

Many thanks guys
Great grandson of Peter Benjamin Spicer (LNWR retired)

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SRman
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Re: Hornby 2-BIL question

Postby SRman » Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:12 am

As the others have already said, they are the route codes for the headcode boxes between the cab windscreens.

Just expanding a bit here:

The real ones had a few incandescent light bulbs behind opal glass, and the route stencils were black-painted metal plates that clipped into the apertures. The small, horizontal band above the main panel could also display a white bar or dots that indicated non-stopping patterns or sometimes other things to the signalmen.

Route numbers could be duplicated between different Southern Railway/Region Divisions, as they could not be confused (e.g. a train with route code 4 on the Brighton Line/Central Division could not possibly be mistaken for a Portsmouth Harbour train on the Western Division - they were geographically well separated).

When the metal stencils were in use, it was rare to have routes showing double digits of the same number, such as 11. 33, 99, etc. This cut down the number of heavy metal stencils that had to be carried loose in the cabs or guard's compartments.

The tail indication was usually just the empty headcode, hence it showed the white opal glass, which is why Hornby have included that option. A red oil tail lamp would always have to be displayed. Of course, because we don't have the option of changing headcodes frequently on our models, we usually have to accept a compromise and have route number codes displayed at both ends of our model units.

These things also all apply to the Hornby 2 HAL and 5 BEL units too (before the BELs were fitted with roller blind headcodes in the late 1960s).

Once roller blind headcodes came along, double digit codes were easier to use (Hastings Line 22, for example), and from the early 1960s onwards, tail indications were two red 'blanks', hence the rules for the Hornby 4 VEP and Bachmann 4 CEP/BEP, 2 EPB/HAP, 2H, and MLV, and classes 71 (Hornby/DJM), 73 (Hornby/Dapol, and 74 (DJM??) are slightly different. Hornby do provide stick on labels to represent the roller blinds on the VEP units and blue/grey BELs.

The SEMG link provided by RFS is very useful ... in fact the whole SEMG site is a very useful resource.

I know I have taken this a bit beyond the original query, but I hope it may help others more generally with all of the SR EMUs and locos.


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