Triang transcontinental referb project (title change)

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alex3410
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Triang transcontinental referb project (title change)

Postby alex3410 » Sun Sep 29, 2013 6:20 pm

Hi all,

I have a double ended blue Triang transcontinental diesel I am replacing the wheels on so that i can run it on modern track.

So far I have chipped it and replaced the wheels on the powered end - i am going to order another set of wheels and replace the unpowered end with a powered unit with the motor removed so that i can add extra pick ups as there are parts on the layout it didn't like (other then those it runs brilliantly :D )

The next step is to get the coaches to play nice and the unpowered dummy car as well so I was after some thoughts / ideas on how to go about it?

for the unpowered end at the moment i have used sandpaper and a drill to reduce the flange however i would prefer a way to use metal wheels in the dummy and look at new bogie units for the coaches all together?

any help is very welcome :D
Last edited by alex3410 on Tue Oct 01, 2013 8:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Bufferstop
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Re: Triang transcontinental on modern track

Postby Bufferstop » Sun Sep 29, 2013 7:01 pm

Whose wheels are you using for the powered bogie? If the the old grey matter is still functioning the dummy power bogies and those on the rest of the rolling stock featured Triang's notorious plastic half axles on a steel pin. There are various ways to tackle these bogies, the quickest and dirtiest requiring some pinpoit wheelsets and a box of matches. You persuaded the wheelset into the bogie, cut the head of a match and cut it in two. Then you pushed the two bits of match in the axle holes until the pinpoint started to dig in. The most technical part was then to push the two parts in equally whilst rotating the wheels. The fibres of the matchwood crushed and the steel pinpoints polished the inner surface. The resultant bodge had slightly less friction than the original. Other options to follow.
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Bufferstop
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Re: Triang transcontinental on modern track

Postby Bufferstop » Sun Sep 29, 2013 11:52 pm

Well this is part two:- I broke off suddenly as my wife arrived home after what I already knew had been a pretty horrendous day of meetings. Anyhow the matchstick trick might have been ok in the sixties but I'm sure we can do better today. Instead of pushing in matchsticks use brass bearing cups (the sort without a rim). You may need to open out the axle holes to allow them to be pushed in from the inside. You'll have to push them in further than their final position to allow the wheelset to go in, then push them back from the outside until you have the wheels held in place but spinning freely. Then put a drop of glue into each axle hole and when you are sure that all is well put a dab of filler into the holes, followed once it has set by a touch of black paint. It's quite a while since I did any of these bogies and the plastic won't have improved any in that time, so proceed very carefully!
Hope this proves helpful.
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alex3410
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Re: Triang transcontinental on modern track

Postby alex3410 » Tue Oct 01, 2013 10:39 am

Thank you for taking the time to reply, the information is very useful

yes they are the half axels and i will try the brass bearing cups method and see how i get on as it should not only deal with the dummy loco but the coaches as well :D

I just need to find a few coaches that are in ok condition, source transfers and figure out the best colour match for repainting them all :shock:

but will be worth it when i get them all sorted and running on my layout!

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Re: Triang transcontinental on modern track

Postby b308 » Tue Oct 01, 2013 10:48 am

Peco still do them:

http://www.peco-uk.com/product.asp?strP ... P_ID=17298

I used to push the axles out with a small nail then push the bearings in from the inside and put the new axle in. Long while since I did one though, that makes it sound so simple, though I can't honestly remember if it was!

BTW those "half axles" were also used on the TT stuff and a fellow modeler found out that the main issue with them wasn't the tread as such but the fact that the two halves of the "axle" could move in or out thus varying the back to backs. He glued the axles in place (ensuring the back to back was correct) and didn't bother replacing the wheels... Having said that the TT wheels were a little finer than the OO ones!

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Re: Triang transcontinental on modern track

Postby Bufferstop » Tue Oct 01, 2013 2:36 pm

The design of the 00 half axles was either serendipity or a bit of clever thinking. If you glued the two halves together they would jump the track when going through any points Triang's included. There were two splines on one half of the axle rod keeping the wheel from moving sideways, the other wheel was free to do whatever it and the track decided. With the one wheel left free the pair moved apart as they passed through the checkrails of a Triang point, moving back together under the effect of the over emphasised cone of the flange and tread. The exaggerated design of the oldest Triang wheels was a hangover from the original Rovex production methods which included plastic loco driving wheels, power being picked up by a pair of stud plungers mounted (on the Pacific) between the drivers and the trailing bogie. The first Triang points had no check rails as the blades were pivoted near the middle of the turnout, the end which would normally meet the frog lining up with the exit rail, avoiding any problem with check and wing rail gaps.
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alex3410
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Re: Triang transcontinental referb project (title change)

Postby alex3410 » Tue Oct 01, 2013 8:43 pm

Next question - i am sure there will be many more :lol:

I need to repaint both of my locos as they are showing their age but will need to get replacement transfers first - i have found these link however they are - or at least appear to be stickers? rather then water slide transfers

Are there alternatives? if not will these be any good?

They also mention about having to match the colour - i am not very good at colour matching :( - is there a 'off the shelf' colour that will match?

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Re: Triang transcontinental referb project (title change)

Postby Bufferstop » Tue Oct 01, 2013 9:17 pm

Yes they are stickers, I used some on my Nellie refurb. The colour matching (at least to my blue 0-4-0) is very good. However the backing is fairly thick, I don't think it would mould to the bonnets of your double ended diesel. Failing all else I might be tempted to buy a set, scan them, take out the backgrounds then print them onto w.s.transfer paper. The old transcontinental range may not have been very close to any prototype but they looked impressive. Very good on an outdoor line with some Rocky Mountain scenery. It had a good run considering it was always going to bite the dust once American imports became available.
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Re: Triang transcontinental referb project (title change)

Postby nickbrad » Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:20 pm

I know I'm dragging a really old thread back from the dead, but does anyone know how to separate the transcontinental coach roofs from the body sides? Mine appear to be glued, (not sure if they all were,) I'd like to replace the windows and fit interiors, also one is a dome car that I'd like to change into a regular coach, (if i can find a replacement roof,) however, due to the age, I don't want to be trying to force them apart if here's some hidden trick to it.

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Re: Triang transcontinental referb project (title change)

Postby Bigmet » Fri Apr 20, 2018 2:08 pm

In my limited - and now very dated - experience there are no special tricks. They are glued assemblies, often with relatively feeble 'snap in' style clips to guide the assembler to getting the parts in correct position, and the glue to do the 'hold'. Any plastic not moulded in black is pretty translucent, and this is helpful. Use a bright LED torch against the outside and you can often see the glue blob location with some squinting through windows, and by flexing the model see where the joins are if this is not obvious.

Then you have to break the glue. Force is required, sometimes the glue hold will snap nicely, sometimes it won't. If you are going to replace the bogies with new ones that are free running, dropping the coach a few feet bogies first onto a hard surface has been known to work. Similarly if the roof is definitely going to be replaced, then that's the component to put all force on, if it breaks before the glue does, nothing is lost and you will probably then have a better view of what more needs doing to release whatever is left.

The glazing mouldings in particular can be very brittle. Cut very carefully if you want to separate it in any way for re-use, very easy to cause it to craze over a large area if cut or broken.

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Re: Triang transcontinental referb project (title change)

Postby Bufferstop » Fri Apr 20, 2018 6:14 pm

Examine the undersides of the coaches. You'll often finder a finger sized hole, on UK stock sometimes covered by the clipped in truss rods. Useful when trying to push out the roof.
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Re: Triang transcontinental referb project (title change)

Postby nickbrad » Sat Apr 21, 2018 8:35 am

I have tried pushing through the hole, all I managed to do was break a pencil :lol:

I can only guess that the roof is glued around the entire rim, I'm going to have to investigate glue break/melting techniques as I cannot and do not want to replace all 4 roof pieces, only the one vista dome one. The rest are purely coming off so I can model interiors.


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