Peco Streamline - Code 100

Any questions about designing a model railway layout or problems with track work.
lee2017
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Peco Streamline - Code 100

Postby lee2017 » Sun Jul 02, 2017 6:00 pm

Sorry if this sounds a really silly question. After receiving much advice already from these forums, I'm experimenting in any-rail at the moment with different layout ideas and I've come across a stumbling block regards to the track.

I understand that you cannot mix Peco Streamline with either Hornby or peco set-track. Where I'm a little bamboozled is regards to the curve radius tracks. Amusing that I'm modeling with Peco Streamline turnouts, would using hornby's curve radius track pieces still cause issues? If so what is the alternative? :)

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Flashbang
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Re: Peco Streamline - Code 100

Postby Flashbang » Sun Jul 02, 2017 6:12 pm

You can mix Hornby or Peco Setrack with Streamline Code 100.
What is different is Streamline is auto set to 50mm centres while Hornby and Setrack is at 67mm. Peco Streamline turnouts are larger radius, typically around a minimum of 24 inches to 60 inches. But with care they can be mixed. But are not a drop in direct replacement for Hornby or Setrack.

So to answer your question it is possible to use Setrack curves and Streamline points. Short pieces of track would need to be inserted I any Streamline points forming a cross over set of points etc to bring the track centres back to 67mm.
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lee2017
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Re: Peco Streamline - Code 100

Postby lee2017 » Sun Jul 02, 2017 6:31 pm

Flashbang wrote:You can mix Hornby or Peco Setrack with Streamline Code 100.
What is different is Streamline is auto set to 50mm centres while Hornby and Setrack is at 67mm. Peco Streamline turnouts are larger radius, typically around a minimum of 24 inches to 60 inches. But with care they can be mixed. But are not a drop in direct replacement for Hornby or Setrack.

So to answer your question it is possible to use Setrack curves and Streamline points. Short pieces of track would need to be inserted I any Streamline points forming a cross over set of points etc to bring the track centres back to 67mm.


Sorry to sound so clueless. What is the alternative to using set track curves with peco streamline 100? Would that be flex-track?

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TimberSurf
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Re: Peco Streamline - Code 100

Postby TimberSurf » Sun Jul 02, 2017 6:56 pm

lee2017 wrote:Sorry to sound so clueless. What is the alternative to using set track curves with peco streamline 100? Would that be flex-track?


Yes, and preferably with live frog points.
Curves can be any radius, but can easily be set to nominal radii with Tracksetta Track Laying Templates
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Dad-1
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Re: Peco Streamline - Code 100

Postby Dad-1 » Sun Jul 02, 2017 8:53 pm

I fear the problem is trying to use a computer planning programme that
probably only understands set-track curves with matching points.
When you get into the range (3 different length) of streamline points
you will have to cut some lengths of track to fit as required, something
the programme probably can't cope with. If it's not a product coded set-track
piece needed to fill a certain gap the computer "Will not compute"
Certainly from a technical point of view all code 100 set-track and streamline
can be used together.
A reason why I have never used a planning programme. Nothing beats a 1:1
drawing on lengths of wallpaper. I have mixed Hornby set-track with Peco
points and Peco flexitrack in one layout.

You can download Peco turnout plans directly from them, probably get printed
pages FOC as I did when I started.

Geoff T.
Remember ... I know nothing about railways.
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Bufferstop
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Re: Peco Streamline - Code 100

Postby Bufferstop » Sun Jul 02, 2017 11:14 pm

Another vote for the roll of paper and some point templates. Cant beat laying it out full size even if you can only have about three feet unrolled at any time. You can always put the odd bit of stock on the plan to check clearances and lengths of headshunts. Unless it's a bit of heavy weight software it won't do transition curves properly and you'll end up with a plan you could have done with setrack. Yes I know about Templot, at 73 I've got better things to do with my time than learn to use it.
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lee2017
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Re: Peco Streamline - Code 100

Postby lee2017 » Mon Jul 03, 2017 1:23 am

Dad-1 wrote:A reason why I have never used a planning programme. Nothing beats a 1:1
drawing on lengths of wallpaper. I have mixed Hornby set-track with Peco
points and Peco flexitrack in one layout.

Bufferstop wrote: Another vote for the roll of paper and some point templates. Cant beat laying it out full size even if you can only have about three feet unrolled at any time. You can always put the odd bit of stock on the plan to check clearances and lengths of headshunts.

I've been messing around 'Any Rail' for days now and still haven't come up with anything like. I think you guys have hit the nail on the head! I love the idea of 1:1 drawing on paper, I'm thinking it may end up being much easier to see what's going on, it will start to give me a sense of scale and it also means that even at this early stage, I can start to feel like I'm getting some hands on with the layout rather than staring at a computer screen all the time.
Last edited by lee2017 on Mon Jul 03, 2017 1:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

Dad-1
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Re: Peco Streamline - Code 100

Postby Dad-1 » Mon Jul 03, 2017 8:17 am

It may look like we're old buffoons, but my younger friend (Bufferstop) and myself
are much more interested in working on the railway than trying to make sense of
a computer programme that really can't do the job.

Were Photobucket not playing up I'd show where I had a long paper plan and the local
club is preparing to replace a layout and we must use paper plans as we intend using
fine scale Markway points and track.

This is also where having a limited size, but realistic plan is better than a pipe-dream
scenario.

Geoff T.
Remember ... I know nothing about railways.
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Ironduke
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Re: Peco Streamline - Code 100

Postby Ironduke » Mon Jul 03, 2017 9:53 am

I've never used AnyRail but XtrkCad works equally with sectional track and streamline and set track points. Basically its designed to join set track pieces and points together using flex track. i.e. a piece of set track is treated the same as a point. So if you do use set track curves and streamline points you can join the gap between a crossover with a small piece of flex or an appropriate piece of set track.

but you can build the whole layout with sectional track of various brands and types if you really want to. Can't say it will make any sense though.

If you really only want to use paper and point templates you can just print them out from XtrkCad.
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Emettman
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Re: Peco Streamline - Code 100

Postby Emettman » Mon Jul 03, 2017 12:15 pm

I use Anyrail and have had no trouble using mixed manufacturer's track in my designs.
I tend to use the Hornby fixed curve track when the radii are down that tight
(Or start with a sketch with R4 and ease the curves later.)
Yes, the natural track separation for Hornby curves and for Streamline points is not the same: that can also be tidied up later on.

I tend to call these plans "sketches" because final verifications and adjustments (if nothing bigger) should be done full-size, with templates of pieces of track.

There is also this:
ANYRAIL: Under "Settings" Under "Behaviour" (on Rt), tick "Allow mixed rails"

Chris
"It's his madness that keeps him sane."

Bigmet
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Re: Peco Streamline - Code 100

Postby Bigmet » Tue Jul 04, 2017 11:04 am

lee2017 wrote:...Where I'm a little bamboozled is regards to the curve radius tracks. Assuming that I'm modeling with Peco Streamline turnouts, would using hornby's curve radius track pieces still cause issues? If so what is the alternative?

The alternative is to use flexitrack, and I think what you are effectively saying here is that you haven't ever formed a curve from flexitrack?

While it is possible to mix a flexitrack system like Peco's Streamline with set track pieces, frankly it is a pain that involves more work than just going with flexitrack throughout. When starting out with flexitrack a minimum radius of 24" is a good plan - it can go much smaller once the skill is developed but leave that for now - however this does require layout space, so measure up what space you have. Part of the joy of flexitrack is that the curve radii can be customised exactly to suit the space, and general experience in OO suggests real benefits in operational reliability as radius increases. (Once above 30" radius you have to work hard in operating the trains badly to make them derail!)

No software to help here: you need to purchase some flexitrack and try forming curves. The way I do it is to start from a point (or network of points) as a fixed location, and then lay the track outwards from there. A drawn line made by a trammel is used to set out curves. It is all 'fit, cut and try' work and needs tools to cut the rail and track base and thus adapt the track to the location. If you use a model shop selling flexitrack, there should be the possibility of a demonstration: arrange in advance to visit when the shop is likely to be quiet.

lee2017
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Re: Peco Streamline - Code 100

Postby lee2017 » Tue Jul 04, 2017 11:00 pm

Thanks again for the replies, I'm finding all the advice and tips from all users here invaluable getting started with modelling my railroad.

Emettman wrote:
I tend to call these plans "sketches" because final verifications and adjustments (if nothing bigger) should be done full-size, with templates of pieces of track.

Chris


Chris this is how I've now started to see any-rail as a tool to start drafting ideas, As most have advised, I feel the real planning will start is when I have bought the new shed and I start drawing and planning on a 1:1 scale. Using some of the techniques advised to me so far here on the forum.

Bigmet wrote:The alternative is to use flexitrack, and I think what you are effectively saying here is that you haven't ever formed a curve from flexitrack?


Yes this is exactly what I am saying. The only experience I've had with model railway was with set-track about 20 years ago when my parents bought me a train-set as a kid. I am at the beginning of a learning curve (no pun intended) which I am really, really looking forward to embarking on, and have been for many years but, just until now I haven't been in the position where I can make sufficient space for a model railway. (I have briefly spoken about my ideas in the welcome section of the forum, however my plans have progressed and I’ll start a thread in the personal setups planning to discuss those.

Bigmet wrote: When starting out with flexitrack a minimum radius of 24" is a good plan - it can go much smaller once the skill is developed but leave that for now - however this does require layout space, so measure up what space you have. Part of the joy of flexitrack is that the curve radii can be customised exactly to suit the space, and general experience in OO suggests real benefits in operational reliability as radius increases. (Once above 30" radius you have to work hard in operating the trains badly to make them derail!)


Again, thanks for these invaluable tips - It will all help me 'planning, and making decisions when drafting ideas, especially the radius figures you have given me. I've read and have been advised that peco points are really well made, and that it is best to use points that are all metal and no plastic bits. Again, I’ll post more about my plans, ideas in the correct section of the forum, but I think I am planning to go with peco streamline code 100 and definitely flexi-track (I've also managed to shuffle my back yard about and made space to increase originally planned 10ft x 8ft shed to 12ft x 10ft. I know I'm only gaining 20 square feet but it's a gain that could allow for a little bit more freedom (especially with larger curve radius).

Bigmet wrote:No software to help here: you need to purchase some flexitrack and try forming curves.

The way I do it is to start from a point (or network of points) as a fixed location, and then lay the track outwards from there. A drawn line made by a trammel is used to set out curves. It is all 'fit, cut and try' work and needs tools to cut the rail and track base and thus adapt the track to the location. If you use a model shop selling flexitrack, there should be the possibility of a demonstration: arrange in advance to visit when the shop is likely to be quiet.


I need another visit to the model railway shop, purely for inspiration and to have another look at the differences between ‘n’ guage and ‘00’ gauge, so for sure I can arrange a good time for a demonstration in cutting flexi-track if they supply it, this is sound advice.

Thank You all once again.
Last edited by lee2017 on Thu Jul 06, 2017 1:44 am, edited 2 times in total.

Bigmet
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Re: Peco Streamline - Code 100

Postby Bigmet » Wed Jul 05, 2017 9:38 am

If you are set on the flexitrack only route, then I would recommend you take a look at Peco code 75 for OO. This is the part of their OO track range that Peco are expanding. It comes with two real advantages for tracklaying, quite apart from its better appearance. It forms the curves much more easily than code 100, and the rails are easier to cut: because the rail cross section is only half that of code 100. With no prior commitments by the sounds of it, why not start from 'better'?

Some older models won't run on it unless wheels are replaced with modern types: but most of what has been produced from the 1990s on is fine, and the currently manufactured products will be trouble free on it.

The one area where Peco track is not so smart is point motors. They still persist with solenoid 'bangers' as point motors, whereas there are now better options in slow motion motors (or servos if you really fancy going 'off piste'). Time travels slowly in Beer, near Seaton, where Peco are based...

Space, we can never have enough! The railway is 'long and thin' and once the width is up to a useful figure for easy radius curves, (ten feet does very nicely in OO) length matters more. Make sure that your shed project is going to result in a good stable building. A floor that deflects as you walk on it or a building that flexes in a gale is going to move the layout around, and all your careful carpentry and tracklaying will be disrupted.


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