Railroad diesel locos

Discuss Hornby Model Railway products and related topics here. This includes (Lima, Rivarossi, Jouef, Electrotren).
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Mountain
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Re: Railroad diesel locos

Postby Mountain » Sun Sep 10, 2017 1:29 am

Was told the Airfix 31's were quite accurate models. I have at least one and they seem good. If my memory serves me correctly (As I would need to get them out to look) is the centre wheels on the power end being in a fixed position. Other then that the models are good. Not had a revamped Hornby version yet so I can't comment. I have to say that accuracy to the prototype I would only notice if it is something major. Some trains I worked in real life I noticed as models they didnt add the dents certain units had in real life due to accidents and incidents, but this is mainly due to the model being general for the class then an individual unit despite having an individual units running number on it.
I tend to look at the general shape and look rather then the tiny details, as to be honest, it is the impression of the locos character rather then rivits and small details in the wrong places. Probably the best improvement over the older models isn't the high accuracy of the tiny details but rather the flush glazed windows with wipers as the inset windows of older models do tend to be noticeably toylike. Not to say the locos and coaches I build have flush glazing. I have enough trouble to stop my fingerprints from showing in the quick setting superglue which sets quick on fingers but slower on the bit one is trying to glue!

GWR_fan
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Re: Railroad diesel locos

Postby GWR_fan » Sun Sep 10, 2017 3:23 am

Mountain wrote:......... I have enough trouble to stop my fingerprints from showing in the quick setting superglue which sets quick on fingers but slower on the bit one is trying to glue!


Given that superglue was initially developed in the Korean War (I believe) as a quick method to seal up wounds, then skin is the ideal medium to glue together.

Bigmet
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Re: Railroad diesel locos

Postby Bigmet » Sun Sep 10, 2017 9:31 am

I'm much the same in terms of model accuracy. If it has the overall character successfully, then I can forgive (or fix if they annoy) all manner of detail mishaps. But if in some way the model doesn't actually suggest the prototype, then it's 'MEEP, Nul points!' and I won't buy it, however good it might otherwise be, unless a fix is clearly and simply possible.

In the case of the main range Hornby Brush 2 (class 30/31) it's the cab side windows, and upper half of the cabs. These should be narrower than the lower half of the cab, and then 'step out' to full width behind the inside edges of the cab doors. The Hornby model has a fudged taper on the windows, and no clear step out to full width, and the model as a result looks like a BRCW machine, seen from head on or nearly so. For me it doesn't get the character of the 'Ped', which I have seen a thousand and more times as a passenger waiting for it to come plodding into the platform. Won't buy it despite much that is excellent otherwise.

With the older Airfix and Lima bodies successfully capturing the appearance - in my case I use the Airfix bodies acquired long ago and much worked on with improvements like flush glazing - and power them with cheap s/h purchases of 'mazak rotted' Hornby brush 2 chassis: the mechanism of the main range model being far and away the best thing ever for this class in OO RTR. All wheels present, centre idler pair smaller sized, heavy and very capable drive.

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Mountain
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Re: Railroad diesel locos

Postby Mountain » Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:46 am

Bigmet wrote:I'm much the same in terms of model accuracy. If it has the overall character successfully, then I can forgive (or fix if they annoy) all manner of detail mishaps. But if in some way the model doesn't actually suggest the prototype, then it's 'MEEP, Nul points!' and I won't buy it, however good it might otherwise be, unless a fix is clearly and simply possible.

In the case of the main range Hornby Brush 2 (class 30/31) it's the cab side windows, and upper half of the cabs. These should be narrower than the lower half of the cab, and then 'step out' to full width behind the inside edges of the cab doors. The Hornby model has a fudged taper on the windows, and no clear step out to full width, and the model as a result looks like a BRCW machine, seen from head on or nearly so. For me it doesn't get the character of the 'Ped', which I have seen a thousand and more times as a passenger waiting for it to come plodding into the platform. Won't buy it despite much that is excellent otherwise.

With the older Airfix and Lima bodies successfully capturing the appearance - in my case I use the Airfix bodies acquired long ago and much worked on with improvements like flush glazing - and power them with cheap s/h purchases of 'mazak rotted' Hornby brush 2 chassis: the mechanism of the main range model being far and away the best thing ever for this class in OO RTR. All wheels present, centre idler pair smaller sized, heavy and very capable drive.

Now you mention that, I never forget the Jouef class 40. Through many magazines I had seen colourful reviews of how detailed the model was and what good quality etc. I missed out on buying one as a child. Then one day about 15 years ago I came across one secondhand at an afordably price.
"Yay" I thought. "Now I can get to see how good it is for real".
When I bought it I didnt pay much notice about the body. I just saw it was a class 40 and it was Jouef. When I got it home and placed in near my other models, though I dont think I had a Lima class 40 back then, I noticed something odd about it. It seemed to have a squashed look. The roofline seemed low and the model was fat! It was quite fat when placed ready to pull some coaches. I'm sure the real things were not like that. No doubt the mechanism inside was quality with its lovely metal wheels. But as a model I just could not live with the odd squat fat look which didnt seem to relate to the loco it was supposed to be.
I began to question the sanity of the model railway press when they gave such reviews so out came the old magazines. Who could have given such crazy reviews. Magazine after magazine... Umm. Found them. Who gave the reviews? Jouef! I should have guessed! :mrgreen:

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SRman
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Re: Railroad diesel locos

Postby SRman » Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:58 pm

The Joueff mechanism was not that crash hot! The motor wasn't too bad but it only drove four wheels (i.e. two axles) and the centre gears tended to drift along the axle, thus disengaging. My fix for that was to add some electrical wire insulation, in the form of a tube slit along its length, slotted over the axle on either side of the gear to keep it rigidly in the centre.

Yes, it was fat, which made it look flat! The detailing was good but that width really was noticeable, far more so, IMHO, than the over-width of the Heljan class 47 bodies.

The Lima 40 was much better in appearance, eclipsing even Bachmann's two efforts on appearance, but not running qualities - the Bachmann one wins hands down on that score, notwithstanding the electrical pickup problems on the most recent releases (Lima locos all benefit from better pickups as well).


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